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Birth dimensions and risk of depression in adulthood: cohort study of Danish men born in 1953.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45699
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2005 May;186:400-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Merete Osler
Merete Nordentoft
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, Blegdamsvej 3, DK-2200, Copenhagen N, Denmark. m.osler@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2005 May;186:400-3
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body Height
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Two British cohort studies have reported birth weight to be associated with self-reported depression in adulthood, even after adjustment for socio-economic factors. AIMS: To examine the relationship between birth dimensions and discharge from a psychiatric ward with a depression diagnosis in adulthood. METHOD: A cohort of 10 753 male singletons born in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1953 and for whom birth certificates had been traced in 1965 were followed from 1969 until 2002, with record linkage for date of first admission to a psychiatric ward that led to a discharge diagnosis of depression. RESULTS: A total of 190 men, corresponding to 1.8% of the cohort, had a discharge diagnosis of depression. The Cox's regression analyses failed to show any association between birth dimensions (birth weight and ponderal index) and risk of psychiatric ward diagnosis of depression in adult life, before or after adjustment for social indicators at birth. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not support the existence of a relation between birth dimensions and psychiatric ward admission for depression in adult men.
PubMed ID
15863744 View in PubMed
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Birth dimensions, parental mortality, and mortality in early adult age: a cohort study of Danish men born in 1953.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58283
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Feb;33(1):92-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Merete Osler
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Feb;33(1):92-9
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Constitution - physiology
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Liver Cirrhosis - mortality
Longevity - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Parents
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Birthweight has, in several studies, been associated with mortality in adult age, even after adjustment for available socioeconomic factors. This association has been explained as a biological result of fetal undernutrition (fetal programming), by genetic predisposition, as a result of confounding by factors related to social position and lifestyle, or by a combination of these mechanisms. This study examines the relationship between birth dimensions and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in early adulthood, taking parental lifespan and social position at time of birth into account. Furthermore, the relationship between offspring birth dimensions and parental mortality is addressed. METHODS: In all 10 753 male singletons born in the metropolitan area of Copenhagen, Denmark in 1953 whose birth certificates had been traced manually in 1965 were followed from 1968 to 2002 for information on parents' and own vital status by linkage with the Civil Registration System. Causes of death for the cohort members were identified by record linkage with the Cause-of-Death Registry. Hazard ratios and 95% CI were calculated using Cox regression models. RESULTS: Low birthweight and especially short birth length were strongly associated with adult mortality risk, but no relationship between low ponderal index at birth and mortality was found. The relationship between birth size and early adult mortality was only slightly attenuated after adjustment for early-life social position and/or maternal and paternal lifespan. The associations between birthweight/birth length and mortality were stronger for the age group 35-49 years compared with the age group 15-34 years. Cause-specific mortality was inversely related to small birth dimensions for all causes of death, but strongest and graded for death from liver cirrhosis. Offspring birth dimensions showed an inverse association with parental mortality, which was most pronounced for maternal mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The strong inverse association between birth dimensions and adult mortality, but lack of association between ponderal index and mortality, indicates that more complicated mechanisms than a general long-term detrimental effect of intrauterine growth retardation explain the association between birth size and adult mortality. The heterogeneous associations between birth dimensions and mortality in young and later adulthood, the minor differences in relative risk of cause-specific mortality, and the heterogeneity in the association between birth dimensions and maternal and paternal mortality, respectively, indicate that several mechanisms (factors related to social position, common genetic factors, and specific organ programming) may account for the relation between birth measures and later mortality.
PubMed ID
15075152 View in PubMed
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Birth weight and polycystic ovary syndrome in adult life: a register-based study on 523,757 Danish women born 1973-1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118503
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Mar 1;99(3):777-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2013
Author
Hanne Mumm
Mads Kamper-Jørgensen
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Dorte Glintborg
Marianne Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. hanne.mumm@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Mar 1;99(3):777-82
Date
Mar-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the association between birth weight and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in adult life in Danish women born 1973-1991.
Register study.
Data were extracted from the Danish Medical Birth Register and the Danish National Patient Register (NPR).
All female children born of Danish mothers in Denmark between 1973 and 1991 were included (n = 523,757) and followed for a total of 4,739,547 person-years at risk.
None.
Information on birth weight was extracted from the Danish Medical Birth Register. The cohort was followed up in the NPR for PCOS diagnoses from age 15 years until the end of 2006. Furthermore, information on maternal diabetes diagnoses was extracted from the NPR.
The risk of PCOS was significantly increased in women with birth weight =4,500 g (incidence rate ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval 1.21-2.03) compared to women with birth weight 3,000-3,499 g. All women with birth weight =4,500 g were born large for gestational age and a birth weight of 4,500 g represented the 98.5th percentile of the birth weights. Women born of mothers diagnosed with diabetes were at increased risk of PCOS. In these women the risk of PCOS increased with decreasing birth weight.
The risk of PCOS was increased in women born with birth weight =4,500 g. In women of diabetic mothers we found an increased risk of PCOS, which was inversely related to birth weight.
PubMed ID
23200688 View in PubMed
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Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia antibodies and pregnancy outcome in Danish women with occupational exposure to animals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268495
Source
Int J Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;28:74-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Bjørn Kantsø
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Kåre Mølbak
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Tine Brink Henriksen
Stine Yde Nielsen
Source
Int J Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;28:74-9
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Adult
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Birth weight
Campylobacter - immunology
Denmark
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Risk factors
Salmonella - immunology
Yersinia - immunology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine antibody titres against Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia in a population-based cohort of pregnant women in Denmark in order to evaluate adverse pregnancy outcomes (miscarriage, preterm birth, and small for gestational age) in relation to occupational exposure to animals in women exposed to food producing animals.
We used data and blood samples from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Serum samples collected during the first trimester from 192 pregnant women who were occupationally exposed to domestic animals and 188 randomly selected unexposed pregnant women were analysed for IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies against Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia. Pregnancy outcomes of interest were identified through the Danish National Patient Register.
Women with occupational exposure to animals had significantly higher IgG antibody concentrations against Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia, whereas they had lower concentrations of IgM and IgA antibodies.
Serological markers were not identified as risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes, with the exception of elevated concentrations of Salmonella antibodies, which were found to be associated with an increased risk of preterm birth.
PubMed ID
25245002 View in PubMed
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Childhood intelligence in relation to adult coronary heart disease and stroke risk: evidence from a Danish birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29377
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2005 Nov;19(6):452-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
G David Batty
Erik L Mortensen
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Merete Osler
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. david-b@msoc.mrc.gla.ac.uk
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2005 Nov;19(6):452-9
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Cerebrovascular Accident - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Odds Ratio
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods
Social Class
Abstract
While recent studies have reported an inverse relation between childhood intelligence test scores and all-cause mortality in later life, the link with disease-specific outcomes has been rarely examined. Furthermore, the potential confounding effect of birthweight and childhood social circumstances is unknown. We investigated the relation of childhood intelligence with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke risk in a cohort of 6910 men born in 1953 in the Copenhagen area of Denmark. Events were ascertained from 1978 to 2000 using a cause-of-death register and hospital discharge records. There were 150 CHD (19 fatal; 131 non-fatal) and 93 stroke (4 fatal; 89 non-fatal) events during follow-up into mid-life. Childhood intelligence was inversely related to CHD with the highest rate apparent in adults with low childhood test scores (HR(lowest vs. highest quartile), 2.70; 95% confidence interval: 1.60, 4.57; P(trend) = 0.0001). After adjustment for paternal social class and birthweight, this association was attenuated only marginally. There was little evidence of a IQ-stroke relationship. The cognitive characteristics captured by IQ testing in the present study, such as communication and problem solving ability, appear to be associated with risk of CHD. Health promotion specialists and clinical practitioners may wish to consider these skills in their interactions with the general public. Replication of these results using studies which hold data on intelligence and socio-economic position across the life course is required.
PubMed ID
16269073 View in PubMed
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Is swimming during pregnancy a safe exercise?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98221
Source
Epidemiology. 2010 Mar;21(2):253-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Mette Juhl
Manolis Kogevinas
Per Kragh Andersen
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, DK-1399 Copenhagen K, Denmark. metjuhl@gmail.com
Source
Epidemiology. 2010 Mar;21(2):253-8
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bicycling - physiology
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy Trimesters - psychology
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Swimming - physiology
Swimming Pools
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Exercise in pregnancy is recommended in many countries, and swimming is considered by many to be an ideal activity for pregnant women. Disinfection by-products in swimming pool water may, however, be associated with adverse effects on various reproductive outcomes. We examined the association between swimming in pregnancy and preterm and postterm birth, fetal growth measures, small-for-gestational-age, and congenital malformations. METHODS: We used self-reported exercise data (swimming, bicycling, or no exercise) that were prospectively collected twice during pregnancy for 74,486 singleton pregnancies. Recruitment to The Danish National Birth Cohort took place 1996-2002. Using Cox, linear and logistic regression analyses, depending on the outcome, we compared swimmers with physically inactive pregnant women; to separate a possible swimming effect from an effect of exercise, bicyclists were included as an additional comparison group. RESULTS: Risk estimates were similar for swimmers and bicyclists, including those who swam throughout pregnancy and those who swam more than 1.5 hours per week. Compared with nonexercisers, women who swam in early/mid-pregnancy had a slightly reduced risk of giving birth preterm (hazard ratio = 0.80 [95% confidence interval = 0.72-0.88]) or giving birth to a child with congenital malformations (odds ratio = 0.89 [0.80-0.98]). CONCLUSIONS: These data do not indicate that swimming in pool water is associated with adverse reproductive outcomes.
PubMed ID
20110815 View in PubMed
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Mechanisms underlying the associations of maternal age with adverse perinatal outcomes: a sibling study of 264 695 Danish women and their firstborn offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132986
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Oct;40(5):1205-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Debbie A Lawlor
Laust Mortensen
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Author Affiliation
MRC Centre for Causal Analyses in Translational Research, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. d.a.lawlor@bristol.ac.uk
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Oct;40(5):1205-14
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Birth Order
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Maternal Age
Perinatal mortality
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Siblings
Young Adult
Abstract
The mechanisms underlying the association between maternal age (both young and older maternal age) and adverse perinatal outcomes are unclear.
We examined the association of maternal age at first birth with preterm birth (
PubMed ID
21752786 View in PubMed
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No excess risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes among women with serological markers of previous infection with Coxiella burnetii: evidence from the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116301
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2013;13:87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Stine Yde Nielsen
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Kåre Mølbak
Niels Henrik Hjøllund
Bjørn Kantsø
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Tine Brink Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Regional Hospital West Jutland, Gl, Landevej 61, Herning 7400, Denmark. stineyde@dadlnet.dk
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2013;13:87
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood - immunology
Birth weight
Coxiella burnetii - immunology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Q Fever - immunology
Young Adult
Abstract
Q fever caused by Coxiella burnetii is transmitted to humans by inhalation of aerosols from animal birth products. Q fever in pregnancy is suspected to be a potential cause of fetal and maternal morbidity and fetal mortality but the pathogenesis is poorly understood, and even in Q fever endemic areas, the magnitude of a potential association is not established.We aimed to examine if presence of antibodies to C. burnetii during pregnancy or seroconversion were associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.
The Danish National Birth Cohort collected blood samples and interview data from 100,418 pregnant women (1996-2002). We sampled 397 pregnant women with occupational or domestic exposure to cattle or sheep and a random sample of 459 women with no animal exposure. Outcome measures were spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, birth weight and Small for Gestational Age (SGA).Blood samples collected in pregnancy were screened for antibodies against C. burnetii by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples positive for IgG or IgM antibodies in the ELISA were confirmed by immunofluorescence antibody test (IFA).
Among the 856 women, 169 (19.7%) women were IFA positive; 147 (87%) of these had occupational or domestic contact with livestock (IFA cutoff?>?=1:128).Two abortions were IFA positive vs. 6 IFA negative (OR: 1.5; 95%CI: 0.3-7.6). Three preterm births were IFA positive vs. 38 IFA negative (OR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.1-1.1). There was a significant difference in birth weight of 168?g (95% CI: 70-267?g) with IFA positive being heavier, and the risk of being SGA was not increased in the newborns of IFA positive women (OR: 0.4; 95%CI: 0.8-1.0).Most seropositive women were IgG positive indicating previous exposure. Seroconversion during pregnancy was found in 10 women; they all delivered live babies at term, but two were SGA.
We found no increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in women with verified exposure to C. burnetii.To our knowledge, this is the first population-based seroepidemiologic study evaluating pregnancy outcome in women with serologically verified exposure to C. burnetii against a comparable reference group of seronegative women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23413787 View in PubMed
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Occupational lifting during pregnancy and child's birth size in a large cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261413
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2014 Jul;40(4):411-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Mette Juhl
Pernille Stemann Larsen
Per Kragh Andersen
Susanne Wulff Svendsen
Jens Peter Bonde
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Katrine Strandberg-Larsen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2014 Jul;40(4):411-9
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Size - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Employment
Female
Humans
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Lifting - adverse effects
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Registries
Weight-Bearing
Abstract
It has been suggested that the handling of heavy loads during pregnancy is associated with impaired fetal growth. We examined the association between quantity and frequency of maternal occupational lifting and the child's size at birth, measured by weight, length, ponderal index, small-for-gestational-age (SGA), abdominal circumference, head circumference, and placental weight.
We analyzed birth size from the Danish Medical Birth Registry of 66 693 live-born children in the Danish National Birth Cohort according to the mother's self-reported information on occupational lifting from telephone interviews around gestational week 16. Data were collected in the period 1996-2002. We used linear and logistic regression models and adjusted for confounders.
In the fully adjusted models, most of the mean differences in birth size measures had values indicating a smaller size of offspring among women with occupational lifting versus women with no lifting, but the differences were very small, and there was a statistically significant trend only for placental weight showing lighter weight with increasing number of kilos lifted per day. In jobs likely to include person-lifting, we found increased odds of SGA among children of women who lifted 501-1000 kilos per day [odds ratio (OR) 1.34, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.98-1.83] and >1000 kilos per day (OR 1.51, 95% CI 0.83-2.76) compared to no lifting. In jobs with no person-lifting, occupational lifting was not associated with SGA.
Overall, we observed no strong support for an association between maternal occupational lifting and impaired size at birth. Our data indicated a potential association between lifting and SGA among offspring of women in occupations that are likely to include person-lifting. These results should, however, be interpreted with caution due to limited statistical power, and we suggest that future studies include detailed, individual information on job functions and ergonomic routines of lifting procedures.
PubMed ID
24647563 View in PubMed
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Occupational lifting of heavy loads and preterm birth: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108805
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2013 Nov;70(11):782-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Stine Bjerrum Runge
Jacob Krabbe Pedersen
Susanne Wulff Svendsen
Mette Juhl
Jens Peter Bonde
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen K, Denmark.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2013 Nov;70(11):782-8
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lifting - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the association between occupational lifting during pregnancy and preterm birth. The risk of preterm birth was estimated for total burden lifted per day and number of medium and heavy loads lifted per day.
In a study population of 62 803 pregnant women enrolled to the Danish National Birth Cohort from 1996 to 2002, the association between self-reported occupational lifting in the first part of pregnancy and preterm birth was analysed using logistic regression models with adjustment for age, parity, cervical cone biopsy, assisted reproduction and smoking. Associations between lifting and extremely (before 28 weeks), very (28-32 weeks) and moderately (33-37 weeks) preterm birth were analysed using Cox regression models.
We found a dose-response relation between total daily burden lifted and preterm birth with an OR of 1.50 (95% CI 1.03 to 2.19) with loads over 1000 kg/day. No threshold value was found. The associations were strongest for extremely and very preterm birth with HRs (95% CIs) of 4.3 (1.4 to 13.8) and 1.7 (0.7 to 4.0), respectively. Lifting heavy loads (>20 kg) more than10 times/day was associated with preterm birth up to an OR of 2.03 (95% CI 1.14 to 3.62).
In a society with social welfare and a highly regulated working environment, occupational lifting was associated with an increased risk of preterm birth.
PubMed ID
23839660 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.