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2696 records – page 1 of 270.

A 1-year follow-up of low birth weight infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia: health, growth, clinical lung disease, cardiovascular and neurological sequelae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59584
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1992 Sep;30(2):109-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992

The 6 kHz acoustic dip in school-aged children in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216259
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J. Haapaniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University Central Hospital of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Birth weight
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, High-Frequency - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In the present study, pure-tone audiometry was used in 687 Finnish school children, aged 6-15 years, to determine the prevalence of a 6 kHz acoustic dip and related factors among three age groups. Trained audiometricians tested air conduction thresholds in a sound-proof room. A total of 57 children (8.3%) had a clear-cut dip of at least 20 dB at 6 kHz. This dip was more pronounced in older children and in boys. A thorough case history was obtained by questionnaire, with logistic regression analysis showing that low birth weight (
PubMed ID
8562032 View in PubMed
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A 12-year cohort study on adverse pregnancy outcomes in Eastern Townships of Canada: impact of endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256963
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Aziz Aris
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, Clinical Research Centre of Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre , Sherbrooke, Quebec , Canada.
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Endometriosis - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Peritoneal Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide a temporal-spatial reference of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) and examine whether endometriosis promotes APO in the same population. Among the 31?068 women who had a pregnancy between 1997 and 2008 in Eastern Townships of Canada, 6749 (21.7%) had APO. These APO increased significantly with maternal age and over time (r(2?)=?0.522, p?=?0.008); and were dominated by preterm birth (9.3%), pregnancy-induced hypertension (8.3%) including gestational hypertension (6.5%), low birth weight (6.3%), gestational diabetes (3.4%), pregnancy loss (2.2%) including spontaneous abortion (1.5%) and stillbirth (0.6%), intrauterine growth restriction (2.1%) and preeclampsia (1.8%). Among the 31?068 pregnancies, 784 (2.5%) had endometriosis and 183 (23.3%) had both endometriosis and APO. Endometriosis has been shown to increase the incidence of fetal loss (OR?=?2.03; 95% CI?=?1.42-2.90, p?
PubMed ID
24134807 View in PubMed
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A 14-year follow-up of children with normal and abnormal birth weight for their gestational age. A population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239462
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1985
Author
P. Rantakallio
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Date
Jan-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Child Development
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Mortality
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Mortality, major neurological handicaps--including mental retardation, cerebral palsy and epilepsy--educational subnormality and height at 14 years of age were studied by birth weight percentiles in a birth cohort of 12 000 children from northern Finland. Infant mortality was significantly higher below the mean -2 SD, 10th and 25th percentiles, than in the median class, from 25th to 75th percentiles, but mortality from one to 14 years only in the lowest weight class. Educational subnormality, including mental retardation +/- some other handicap, was highly significantly more frequent in all the percentile classes lower than the median class but showed no significant tendency to be less frequent in the percentiles over the median. It was also highly significantly more frequent among the preterm than the term infant. The number of children with a major neurological handicap but normal school performance did not vary significantly by birth weight percentiles or by gestational age. Height at 14 years increased significantly by birth weight percentiles. The height of the boys with birth weight mean - and +2 SD was nevertheless within the 25th-75th percentiles for height at 14 years in general, while the height of the girls came close to these percentile limits. The preterm infants were significantly shorter than the term infants at 14 years.
PubMed ID
3984729 View in PubMed
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40-year follow-up of overweight children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38058
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1989
Author
H O Mossberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Date
Aug-26-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
504 overweight children admitted to hospital between 1921 and 1947 were followed up for 40 years by questionnaires at 10 year intervals. The mean weight for height (W/H) standard deviation score (SDS) reached a maximum in puberty (+3.5). The SDS fell to about +1 in adulthood. 47% patients were still obese (SDS greater than +1) in adulthood; 84.6% of these had SDS more than +2 in childhood. The degree of obesity in the family (parents and grandparents) and the degree of overweight in puberty were the most important factors for weight level in adulthood. Even when their food intake was in accordance with recommended levels, obese children had higher than normal weight as adults. Excessive overweight in puberty (SDS greater than +3) was associated with higher than expected morbidity and mortality in adult life. Weight-reducing measures should be started early in life to improve the unfavourable long-term prognosis for very obese children.
PubMed ID
2570196 View in PubMed
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The -238 and -308 G-->A polymorphisms of the tumor necrosis factor alpha gene promoter are not associated with features of the insulin resistance syndrome or altered birth weight in Danish Caucasians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47878
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Apr;85(4):1731-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
S K Rasmussen
S A Urhammer
J N Jensen
T. Hansen
K. Borch-Johnsen
O. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center and Hagedorn Research Institute, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Apr;85(4):1731-4
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - genetics
Body constitution
Body mass index
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - genetics
Lipids - blood
Male
Obesity - genetics
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - genetics
Abstract
Recently, two G-->A polymorphisms at positions -308 and -238, in the promoter of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene, have been identified. These variants have, in different ethnic groups, been linked to estimates of insulin resistance and obesity. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether these genetic variants of TNF-alpha were associated with features of the insulin resistance syndrome or alterations in birth weight in two Danish study populations comprising 380 unrelated young healthy subjects and 249 glucose-tolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients, respectively. All study participants underwent an iv glucose tolerance test with the addition of tolbutamide after 20 min. In addition, a number of biochemical and anthropometric measures were performed on each subject. The subjects were genotyped for the polymorphisms by applying PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism. Neither of the variants was related to altered insulin sensitivity index or other features of the insulin resistance syndrome (body mass index, waist to hip ratio, fat mass, fasting serum lipids or fasting serum insulin or C-peptide). Birth weight and the ponderal index were also not associated with the polymorphisms. In conclusion, although the study was carried out on sufficiently large study samples, the study does not support a major role of the -308 or -238 substitutions of the TNF-alpha gene in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance or altered birth weight among Danish Caucasian subjects.
PubMed ID
10770222 View in PubMed
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[Acceleration of physical development of children in the 1st year of life and characteristics of development of children with birth weights of 3000-4000 g].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255659
Source
Pediatriia. 1972 Feb;51(2):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1972
Author
I I Sokolova
Source
Pediatriia. 1972 Feb;51(2):64-7
Date
Feb-1972
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Female
Growth
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Moscow
PubMed ID
5036300 View in PubMed
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Access to intensive neonatal care and neonatal survival in low birthweight infants: a population study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60131
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1987 Apr;1(1):33-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
J F Forbes
K E Larssen
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Social Paediatric and Obstetric Research Unit, University of Glasgow, Scotland.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1987 Apr;1(1):33-42
Date
Apr-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - mortality
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Norway
Prenatal Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This study evaluates the impact of regional differences in access to intensive neonatal care on neonatal survival in geographically defined populations of 4,692 low birthweight births in Norway 1979-81. For infants weighting 1,250 to 2,499 g our results are consistent with the existence of a dose-response association between neonatal survival and the level of immediate access to intensive neonatal care. Although not statistically significant, there was a clear gradient in the risk of mortality within 24 hours. A similar pattern of survival could not be consistently demonstrated for infants weighing less than 1,250 g.
PubMed ID
3506188 View in PubMed
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Accidental out-of-hospital births in Finland: incidence and geographical distribution 1963-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202145
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 May;78(5):372-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
K. Viisainen
M. Gissler
A L Hartikainen
E. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
STAKES (National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health), University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 May;78(5):372-8
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Delivery Rooms - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Hospitals - standards
Hospitals, Maternity - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Urban Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study aims to describe the incidence and geographical distribution of accidental out-of-hospital births (accidental births) in Finland in relation to the changes in the hospital network, and to compare the perinatal outcomes of accidental births and all hospital births.
Data for the incidence and distribution analyses of accidental births were obtained from the official statistics between 1962 and 1973 and from the national Medical Birth Registry (MBR) in 1992-1993. The infant outcomes were analyzed for the MBR data in 1991-1995.
Between 1963 and 1975 the central hospital network expanded and by 1975 they covered 72% of births. The number of small maternity units has decreased since 1963. The incidence of accidental births decreased between 1963 and 1973, from 1.3 to 0.4 per 1000 births, and rose by the 1990s to 1/1000. In the 1990s the parity adjusted risk of an accidental birth was higher for residents of northern than of southern Finland, OR 2.51 (CI 1.75-3.60), and for residents of rural compared to urban municipalities, OR 3.26 (CI 2.48-4.27). The birthweight adjusted risk for a perinatal death was higher in accidental births than in hospital births, OR 3.11 (CI 1.42-6.84).
A temporal correlation between closing of small hospitals and an increase in accidental birth rates was detected. Due to the poor infant outcomes of accidental births, centralization policies should include measures to their prevention.
PubMed ID
10326879 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of cadmium, zinc, and copper in maternal blood and developmental placental tissue: differences between Finland, Estonia, and St. Petersburg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198281
Source
Environ Res. 2000 May;83(1):54-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M. Kantola
R. Purkunen
P. Kröger
A. Tooming
J. Juravskaja
M. Pasanen
S. Saarikoski
T. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, University of Kuopio, Finland. marjatta.kantola@uku.fi
Source
Environ Res. 2000 May;83(1):54-66
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
7-Alkoxycoumarin O-Dealkylase - metabolism
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cadmium - analysis - blood
Copper - analysis - blood
Drug Interactions
Estonia
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Placenta - chemistry - enzymology
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
Regression Analysis
Russia
Smoking - blood - metabolism
Zinc - analysis - blood
Abstract
Cadmium, zinc, and copper from placental tissue and blood samples at the first trimester (n = 64) and at term (n = 152) were analyzed; the welfare of newborns and placental 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) activities in vitro were determined. The study material was collected from Finland, Estonia, and Russia. The results demonstrate that Cd starts to accumulate in the placenta during the first trimester and that Zn and Cu contents were significantly higher at the first trimester than at term. Among nonsmokers a negative correlation was found between placental Cu content and birth weight of neonates. Among smokers a positive correlation between placental Zn content and birth weight and ECOD activity was found. The birth weights correlated inversely with the length of time the mothers smoked. The highest Cd concentrations were detected in the samples collected from St. Petersburg. The data demonstrate an inverse accumulation of Zn and Cd throughout the pregnancy in the placenta and maternal blood samples. Zn may act as a positive marker or even an enzymatic enhancement for the human placental vital functions. Smoking, parity, age, and especially the place of residence affect the Cd, Zn, and Cu contents and ratios in placenta and mother's blood.
PubMed ID
10845782 View in PubMed
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2696 records – page 1 of 270.