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Accuracy and correlates of maternal recall of birthweight and gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85768
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jun;115(7):886-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Adegboye A R A
Heitmann Bl
Author Affiliation
University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Research in Childhood Health, Denmark. aar@ipm.regionh.dk
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jun;115(7):886-93
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth Certificates
Birth Weight - physiology
Child
Denmark
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Mothers - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of maternal recall of children birthweight (BW) and gestational age (GA), using the Danish Medical Birth Register (DBR) as reference and to examine the reliability of recalled BW and its potential correlates. DESIGN: Comparison of data from the DBR and the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS). SETTING: Schools in Odense, Denmark. POPULATION: A total of 1271 and 678 mothers of school children participated with information in the accuracy studies of BW and GA, respectively. The reliability sample of BW was composed of 359 women. METHOD: The agreement between the two sources was evaluated by mean differences (MD), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman's plots. The misclassification of the various BW and GA categories were also estimated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Differences between recalled and registered BW and GA. RESULTS: There was high agreement between recalled and registered BW (MD =-0.2 g; ICC = 0.94) and GA (MD = 0.3 weeks; ICC = 0.76). Only 1.6% of BW would have been misclassified into low, normal or high BW and 16.5% of GA would have been misclassified into preterm, term or post-term based on maternal recall. The logistic regression revealed that the most important variables in the discordance between recalled and registered BW were ethnicity and parity. Maternal recall of BW was highly reliable (MD =-5.5 g; ICC = 0.93), and reliability remained high across subgroups. CONCLUSION: Maternal recall of BW and GA seems to be sufficiently accurate for clinical and epidemiological use.
PubMed ID
18485168 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin levels measured in dried blood spot samples from neonates born small and appropriate for gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162263
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
A. Klamer
K. Skogstrand
D M Hougaard
B. Nørgaard-Petersen
A. Juul
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neonatology (section 5021), National University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. anja.klamer@rh.dk
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Cross Reactions - physiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - blood
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - blood
Male
Maternal Age
Abstract
Adiponectin levels measured in neonatal dried blood spot samples (DBSS) might be affected by both prematurity and being born small for gestational age (SGA). The aim of the study was to measure adiponectin levels in routinely collected neonatal DBSS taken on day 5 (range 3-12) postnatal from infants.
A retrospective case-control study.
One hundred and twenty-two infants: 62 very premature (34 SGA) and 60 mature infants (27 SGA). Adiponectin concentrations were determined in stored neonatal DBSS using a sandwich immunoassay based on flow metric Luminex xMap technology.
Adiponectin was measurable in all samples, and repeated measurements correlated significantly (r = 0.94). Adiponectin concentrations were negatively associated with both SGA (B = -0.283, P = 0.04) and prematurity (B = -2.194, P
PubMed ID
17656597 View in PubMed
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Adolescent body composition and associations with body size and growth from birth to late adolescence. The Tromsø study: Fit Futures-A Norwegian longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300460
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2019 05; 14(5):e12492
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2019
Author
Elin Evensen
Nina Emaus
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Ane Kokkvoll
Jonathan Wells
Tom Wilsgaard
Anne Winther
Guri Skeie
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2019 05; 14(5):e12492
Date
05-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Fat and fat-free masses and fat distribution are related to cardiometabolic risk.
to explore how birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI) and BMI gain were related to adolescent body composition and central obesity.
In a population-based longitudinal study, body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 907 Norwegian adolescents (48% girls). Associations between birth weight, BMI categories, and BMI gain were evaluated by fitting linear mixed models and conditional growth models with fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2 ), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m2 ) standard deviation scores (SDS), and central obesity at 15 to 20 years, as well as change in FMI SDS and FFMI SDS between ages 15 to 17 and 18 to 20 as outcomes.
Birth weight was associated with FFMI in adolescence. Greater BMI gain in childhood, conditioned on prior body size, was associated with higher FMI, FFMI, and central overweight/obesity with the strongest associations seen at age 6 to 16.5 years: FMI SDS: ß = 0.67, 95% CI (0.63-0.71), FFMI SDS: 0.46 (0.39, 0.52), in girls, FMI SDS: 0.80 (0.75, 0.86), FFMI SDS: 0.49 (0.43, 0.55), in boys.
Compared with birth and early childhood, high BMI and greater BMI gain at later ages are strong predictors of higher fat mass and central overweight/obesity at 15 to 20 years of age.
PubMed ID
30590874 View in PubMed
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Advanced pubertal growth spurt in subjects born preterm: the Helsinki study of very low birth weight adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138699
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Karoliina Wehkalampi
Petteri Hovi
Leo Dunkel
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, Mannerheimintie 164, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. karoliina.wehkalampi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - physiology
Male
Menarche - physiology
Parents
Pregnancy
Puberty - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Voice - physiology
Abstract
Among people born at term, low birth weight is associated with early puberty. Early maturation may be on the pathway linking low birth weight with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Subjects born preterm with very low birth weight (VLBW;
PubMed ID
21147886 View in PubMed
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Are babies born to short, primiparous, or thin mothers "normally" or "abnormally" small?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77635
Source
J Pediatr. 2007 Jun;150(6):603-7, 607.e1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Zhang Xun
Cnattingius Sven
Platt Robert W
Joseph K S
Kramer Michael S
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 2007 Jun;150(6):603-7, 607.e1-3
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Size - physiology
Female
Fetus - physiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Male
Parity
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine whether the smaller size of infants born to primiparous, short, or thin mothers is associated with increased risks of perinatal mortality. STUDY DESIGN: We compared gestational age-specific patterns of "revealed" small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth (number of SGA births expressed as a proportion of fetuses remaining in utero at each gestational age) with the patterns for perinatal mortality among singleton late fetal deaths and live births (n = 791,523) to Swedish mothers in 1992 to 2001. RESULTS: Based on a single standard for SGA, primiparae were at substantially higher risk of revealed SGA throughout gestation, paralleling the pattern for perinatal mortality. However, for short and thin women, risks of revealed SGA were much more consistent with those for perinatal mortality when SGA was based on height-specific or body mass index-specific standards, respectively, rather than on the single standard. Overweight and obese mothers had lower revealed SGA rates based on either standard but higher perinatal mortality rates. CONCLUSIONS: Slower fetal growth due to maternal short stature or low prepregnancy body mass index appears to be physiologic, whereas the slower growth of fetuses born to primiparous women is associated with higher risks of perinatal death.
PubMed ID
17517243 View in PubMed
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The association between height and birth order: evidence from 652,518 Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256596
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 Jul;67(7):571-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Mikko Myrskylä
Karri Silventoinen
Aline Jelenkovic
Per Tynelius
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Max Planck Research Group Lifecourse Dynamics and Demographic Change, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany. myrskyla@demogr.mpg.de
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 Jul;67(7):571-7
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Order
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Height - genetics - physiology
Cohort Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Military Personnel
Registries
Regression Analysis
Siblings
Social Class
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Birth order is associated with outcomes such as birth weight and adult socioeconomic position (SEP), but little is known about the association with adult height. This potential birth order-height association is important because height predicts health, and because the association may help explain population-level height trends. We studied the birth order-height association and whether it varies by family characteristics or birth cohort.
We used the Swedish Military Conscription Register to analyse adult height among 652,518 men born in 1951-1983 using fixed effects regression models that compare brothers and account for genetic and social factors shared by brothers. We stratified the analysis by family size, parental SEP and birth cohort. We compared models with and without birth weight and birth length controls.
Unadjusted analyses showed no differences between the first two birth orders but in the fixed effects regression, birth orders 2, 3 and 4 were associated with 0.4, 0.7 and 0.8 cm (p
PubMed ID
23645856 View in PubMed
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Association between size at birth, truncal fat and obesity in adult life and its contribution to blood pressure and coronary heart disease; study in a high birth weight population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53352
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 May;58(5):812-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
I. Gunnarsdottir
B E Birgisdottir
R. Benediktsson
V. Gudnason
I. Thorsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-University Hospital, Iceland. ingigun@landspitali.is
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 May;58(5):812-8
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - anatomy & histology
Adipose Tissue
Adult
Aged
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Constitution - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between size at birth and obesity as well as truncal fat, and its contribution to cardiovascular risk in a high birth weight population. DESIGN: Cohort-study with retrospectively collected data on size at birth. SETTING: Reykjavik, Iceland. SUBJECTS: A total of 1874 men and 1833 women born in Reykjavik during 1914-1935. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Size at birth. Adult weight, height and skinfold thickness measurements, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (CHD). RESULTS: Birth weight was positively related to adult body mass index (BMI) in both genders (B=0.35+/-0.14 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.015, P=0.012 and B=0.34+/-0.17 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.055, P=0.043 in men and women, respectively). However, high birth weight was not a risk factor for adult obesity (BMI>/=30 kg/m(2)). In the highest birth weight quartile, the odds ratio (95% CI) for being above the 90th percentile of truncal fat was 0.7 (0.6-1.0, P=0.021) for men and 0.4 (0.3-0.8, P=0.002) for women, compared with the lowest birth weight quartile. Truncal fat and BMI were positively related to blood pressure in both genders (P
PubMed ID
15116085 View in PubMed
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The association of birthweight and contemporary size with insulin resistance among children from Estonia and Denmark: findings from the European Youth Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29645
Source
Diabet Med. 2005 Jul;22(7):921-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
D A Lawlor
C J Riddoch
A S Page
S A Anderssen
K. Froberg
M. Harro
D. Stansbie
G Davey Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, UK. d.a.lawlor@bristol.ac.uk
Source
Diabet Med. 2005 Jul;22(7):921-30
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Birth Weight - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess the associations of birthweight, contemporary body mass index and height with insulin resistance in children. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: From Estonia (n = 1174) and Denmark (n = 1018), 2192 school children aged 9 and 15 years were randomly selected. MAIN OUTCOMES: Insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment), triglyceride levels, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and systolic blood pressure. RESULTS: There was an inverse association between birthweight and insulin resistance and a positive association between contemporary body mass index and insulin resistance. With adjustment for maternal and paternal educational level, income, smoking and body mass index, an increase of one unit of sex, age and country standardized body mass index z-score was associated with a 5% (95% CI: 2, 7%) increase in homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) score and a one-unit z-score increase in birthweight with a 2% (95% CI: 0, 5%) decrease in HOMA score. In the 9-year-old age group, height was positively associated with insulin resistance [for a one-unit increase in height z-score HOMA score increased by 30% (95% CI: 14, 50%)], but in the 15-year-old age group there was no association between height and insulin resistance (4% (95% CI: -5, 14%), P for interaction with age group = 0.001). For both ages, those in the lowest third of the birthweight distribution and highest third of the body mass index distribution were most insulin resistant and, among 9-year olds, those in the lowest third of the birthweight distribution and highest third of the height distribution were most insulin resistant. Birthweight was only inversely associated with systolic blood pressure when adjustment was made for either contemporary body mass index or height and there was no association between birthweight and high-density lipoprotein or triglyceride concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these results suggest that a slow intrauterine growth trajectory and/or a fast post-natal growth trajectory is associated with greater insulin resistance in childhood.
PubMed ID
15975109 View in PubMed
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Association of cerebral palsy with Apgar score in low and normal birthweight infants: population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140216
Source
BMJ. 2010;341:c4990
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kari Kveim Lie
Else-Karin Grøholt
Anne Eskild
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. kari.kveim.lie@fhi.no
Source
BMJ. 2010;341:c4990
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Birth weight
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - etiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Hemiplegia - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quadriplegia - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To assess the association of Apgar score 5 minutes after birth with cerebral palsy in both normal weight and low birthweight children, and also the association with the cerebral palsy subdiagnoses of quadriplegia, diplegia, and hemiplegia.
Population based cohort study.
The Medical Birth Registry of Norway was used to identify all babies born between 1986 and 1995. These data were linked to the Norwegian Registry of Cerebral Palsy in Children born 1986-95, which was established on the basis of discharge diagnoses at all paediatric departments in Norway.
All singletons without malformations born in Norway during 1986-95 and who survived the first year of life (n=543?064).
Cerebral palsy diagnosed before the age of 5 years.
988 children (1.8 in 1000) were diagnosed with cerebral palsy before the age of 5 years. In total, 11% (39/369) of the children with Apgar score of less than 3 at birth were diagnosed with cerebral palsy, compared with only 0.1% (162/179?515) of the children with Apgar score of 10 (odds ratio (OR) 53, 95% CI 35 to 80 after adjustment for birth weight). In children with a birth weight of 2500 g or more, those with an Apgar score of less than 4 were much more likely to have cerebral palsy than those who had an Apgar score of more than 8 (OR 125, 95% confidence interval 91 to 170). The corresponding OR in children weighing less than 1500 g was 5 (95% CI 2 to 9). Among children with Apgar score of less than 4, 10-17% in all birthweight groups developed cerebral palsy. Low Apgar score was strongly associated with each of the three subgroups of spastic cerebral palsy, although the association was strongest for quadriplegia (adjusted OR 137 for Apgar score 8, 95% CI 77 to 244).
Low Apgar score was strongly associated with cerebral palsy. This association was high in children with normal birth weight and modest in children with low birth weight. The strength of the association differed between subgroups of spastic cerebral palsy. Given that Apgar score is a measure of vitality shortly after birth, our findings suggest that the causes of cerebral palsy are closely linked to factors that reduce infant vitality.
Notes
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Comment In: J Pediatr. 2011 May;158(5):860-121482248
Comment In: BMJ. 2010;341:c517520929921
PubMed ID
20929920 View in PubMed
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[A woman's weight before and during pregnancy is of importance to her infant. USA guidelines would benefit public health in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30568
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Nov 27;100(48):3954-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-2003
Author
Elisabet Forsum
Karin Boström
Britt Eriksson
Sabina Olin-Skoglund
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för nutrition, institutionen för biomedicin och kirurgi, Linköpings universitet. EliFo@ibk.liu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Nov 27;100(48):3954-8
Date
Nov-27-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
English Abstract
Female
Guidelines
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal health services
Obesity - etiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Complications - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
United States
Weight Gain - physiology
Abstract
This paper describes weight gain during pregnancy in Sweden in relation to guidelines from the United States. These guidelines take into consideration the fact that optimal weight gain during pregnancy is related to the woman's prepregnant weight in relation to her height. Almost 50 per cent of women delivering babies in Sweden during the year 2000 were obese or overweight. In the three populations studied, less than 50 per cent gained weight in accordance with the US guidelines, while more than 20 per cent gained less weight than recommended. The results indicate that, in Sweden, more attention should be paid to the body weight of women who bear children.
PubMed ID
14717089 View in PubMed
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177 records – page 1 of 18.