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Accumulation of cadmium, zinc, and copper in maternal blood and developmental placental tissue: differences between Finland, Estonia, and St. Petersburg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198281
Source
Environ Res. 2000 May;83(1):54-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M. Kantola
R. Purkunen
P. Kröger
A. Tooming
J. Juravskaja
M. Pasanen
S. Saarikoski
T. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, University of Kuopio, Finland. marjatta.kantola@uku.fi
Source
Environ Res. 2000 May;83(1):54-66
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
7-Alkoxycoumarin O-Dealkylase - metabolism
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cadmium - analysis - blood
Copper - analysis - blood
Drug Interactions
Estonia
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Placenta - chemistry - enzymology
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
Regression Analysis
Russia
Smoking - blood - metabolism
Zinc - analysis - blood
Abstract
Cadmium, zinc, and copper from placental tissue and blood samples at the first trimester (n = 64) and at term (n = 152) were analyzed; the welfare of newborns and placental 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) activities in vitro were determined. The study material was collected from Finland, Estonia, and Russia. The results demonstrate that Cd starts to accumulate in the placenta during the first trimester and that Zn and Cu contents were significantly higher at the first trimester than at term. Among nonsmokers a negative correlation was found between placental Cu content and birth weight of neonates. Among smokers a positive correlation between placental Zn content and birth weight and ECOD activity was found. The birth weights correlated inversely with the length of time the mothers smoked. The highest Cd concentrations were detected in the samples collected from St. Petersburg. The data demonstrate an inverse accumulation of Zn and Cd throughout the pregnancy in the placenta and maternal blood samples. Zn may act as a positive marker or even an enzymatic enhancement for the human placental vital functions. Smoking, parity, age, and especially the place of residence affect the Cd, Zn, and Cu contents and ratios in placenta and mother's blood.
PubMed ID
10845782 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antenatal corticosteroids for preterm birth: dose-dependent reduction in birthweight, length and head circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139521
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Mar;100(3):364-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Hanna Norberg
Jannica Stålnacke
Rochellys Diaz Heijtz
Ann-Charlotte Smedler
Margareta Nyman
Hans Forssberg
Mikael Norman
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. hanna.norberg@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Mar;100(3):364-9
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Weight - drug effects
Body Height - drug effects
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Gestational Age
Glucocorticoids - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Head - growth & development
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - drug therapy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids (ACS) on foetal growth.
We studied 94 infants exposed to 2-9 courses of ACS. Mean gestational age (GA) at first exposure was 29 and at birth 34 weeks. Exposure data were retrieved from case record files. Information on potential confounders was collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Standard deviation scores (SDS) for birthweight (BW), birthlength (BL) and head circumference (HC) were calculated and considered as outcomes.
GA at start of ACS did not affect outcome. BW-SDS, BL-SDS and HC-SDS were -0.21, -0.19 and +0.25 in infants exposed to two courses, compared to -1.01, -1.04 and -0.23 in infants exposed to = 4 courses of ACS (p = 0.04-0.07). In multiple regression analyses, = 4 courses were associated with lower BW-SDS, BL-SDS and HC-SDS (p = 0.007-0.04) compared to SDS after 2-3 courses. The effects from = 4 courses on BW and BL were comparable to reduction in birth size seen in twins and on HC to that observed after maternal smoking.
Multiple courses of ACS are associated with a dose-dependent decline in foetal growth, which may affect later development and health.
PubMed ID
21054513 View in PubMed
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Antihypertensive medication use during pregnancy and the risk of major congenital malformations or small-for-gestational-age newborns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143835
Source
Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2010 Apr;89(2):147-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
H R Nakhai-Pour
E. Rey
A. Bérard
Author Affiliation
University of Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2010 Apr;89(2):147-54
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects
Birth Weight - drug effects
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology - etiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - drug therapy
Abstract
In spite of the widespread use of antihypertensives during pregnancy, data on their risks and benefits for the newborn are limited. We investigated the risk of major congenital malformations or small-for-gestational-age newborns (SGA) in relation to gestational use of antihypertensives.
Within the Quebec Pregnancy Registry, we conducted two case-control studies. First, cases were defined as major congenital malformations diagnosed during the first year of life and controls were selected from the same cohort; index date was date of delivery. Gestational exposure was defined as filling a prescription for an antihypertensive during the 1st trimester of pregnancy. Next, cases (SGA) were defined as newborns with a birth weight or =10 percentile. Gestational exposure was defined as filling a prescription for an antihypertensive during the 2nd or 3rd trimester. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).
We found that overall antihypertensives use during the 2nd or 3rd trimesters of pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of SGA (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.17-1.99). Moreover, selective beta-blocker (OR 6.00, 95% CI 1.06-33.87), alpha beta blocker (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.04-4.88), or centrally-acting adrenergic agents use (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.00-2.89) was associated with a higher risk of SGA compared to non-use.
Gestational use of antihypertensives, especially beta-blocker, alpha beta blocker, or centrally-acting adrenergic agents, may increase the risk of SGA.
PubMed ID
20437474 View in PubMed
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Association of maternal serum concentrations of 2,2', 4,4'5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE) levels with birth weight, gestational age and preterm births in Inuit and European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141020
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Bogdan J Wojtyniak
Daniel Rabczenko
Bo A G Jönsson
Valentyna Zvezday
Henning S Pedersen
Lars Rylander
Gunnar Toft
Jan K Ludwicki
Katarzyna Góralczyk
Anna Lesovaya
Lars Hagmar
Jens Peter Bonde
Author Affiliation
Department-Centre of Monitoring and Analyses of Population Health, National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland. bogdan@pzh.gov.pl
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:56
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Gestational Age
Greenland
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood - toxicity
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - growth & development
Inuits
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Poland
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Epidemiological studies on the association between maternal exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and fetal growth alteration report inconsistent findings which weights in favor of additional studies.
Blood samples were collected from interviewed pregnant women in Greenland (572), Kharkiv (611) and Warsaw (258) and were analyzed for CB-153 and p,p'-DDE by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data on birth weight, gestational age and preterm birth were obtained for 1322 singleton live births. We examined the association between natural log-transformed serum POPs concentration and birth weight and gestational age using multiple linear regression and the association with prematurity using logistic regression controlling for potential confounding factors.
The median serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE were for Inuit mothers 105.6 and 298.9, for Kharkiv mothers 27.0 and 645.4 and for Warsaw mothers 10.7 and 365.2 ng/g lipids, respectively. Increase in CB-153 concentration by one unit on the log scale in Inuit mothers serum was associated with significant decrease in infant birth weight of -59 g and gestational age by -0.2 week. Decreases observed in the cohorts in Kharkiv (-10 g and -0.1 week) and in Warsaw (-49 g and -0.2 week) were not statistically significant. Increase in p,p'-DDE concentration by one unit on the log scale was associated with a statistically significant decrease in infant birth weight of -39.4 g and -104.3 g and shortening of gestational age of -0.2 week and -0.6 week in the Inuit and Warsaw cohorts, respectively. In the Kharkiv cohort decrease in birth weight (-30.5 g) was not significant, however a shortening of gestational age of -0.2 week per increase in p,p'-DDE concentration by one unit on the log scale was of the borderline significance. There was no significant association between CB-153 and p,p'-DDE concentrations and risk of preterm birth however, in all cohorts the odds ratio was above 1.
In utero exposure to POPs may reduce birth weight and gestational age of newborns however, new insights as to why results vary across studies were not apparent.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20819217 View in PubMed
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Association of Prenatal Ibuprofen Exposure with Birth Weight and Gestational Age: A Population-Based Sibling Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284134
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(12):e0166971
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Katerina Nezvalová-Henriksen
Mollie Wood
Olav Spigset
Hedvig Nordeng
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(12):e0166971
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Birth Weight - drug effects
Child
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Ibuprofen - adverse effects
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology
Propensity Score
Prospective Studies
Siblings
Abstract
Three studies so far have investigated the effect of prenatal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) exposure on birth weight and gestational age. The aim in this study was to evaluate the association of prenatal ibuprofen with birth weight and gestational age at birth, using a sibling design in an attempt to adjust for the possibility of familial confounding.
Using data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN), we identified 28 597 siblings, of whom 1080 were prenatally exposed to ibuprofen and 26 824 were not exposed to any NSAID. Random and fixed effects models with propensity score adjustment were used to evaluate the effects of ibuprofen exposure on birth weight and gestational age.
Ibuprofen exposure during the first trimester was associated with a decrease in birth weight of 79 grams (95% confidence interval -133 to -25 grams). In contrast, second and/or third trimester exposure, and duration of exposure had no impact on the effect estimates. We found no association between ibuprofen exposure and gestational age at birth.
Our results suggest that prenatal exposure to ibuprofen during the first trimester is associated with a slight decrease in birth weight. The association does not seem to be attributable to shared genetics and family environment, and could be explained by either exposure to ibuprofen, or to non-shared confounding between pregnancies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27936000 View in PubMed
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Birth weight and sex of children and the correlation to the body burden of PCDDs/PCDFs and PCBs of the mother.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206644
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1998 Feb;106(2):61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
T. Vartiainen
J J Jaakkola
S. Saarikoski
J. Tuomisto
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Health, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1998 Feb;106(2):61-6
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Benzofurans - adverse effects - analysis
Birth Weight - drug effects
Body Burden
Diet
Education
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Milk, human - chemistry
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - adverse effects - analysis
Pregnancy
Rural Population
Seafood
Sex ratio
Socioeconomic Factors
Soil Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Urban Population
Abstract
Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were analyzed in 167 random human milk samples from urban and rural areas in Finland. Dietary habits and background information on each mother and child were gathered by questionnaire. Body mass indexes (BMI) before pregnancy and delivery in the rural area were 5-10% higher than in the urban area, but fat content of mother's milk was about 10% higher in the urban area. The mean weights of children (+/- standard deviation) were similar in the rural and urban areas among primiparae, 3,500 +/- 597 g and 3,505 +/- 454 g, respectively, although dioxin international toxic equivalents (I-TEQs) were significantly higher in the urban area. The mother's level of education did not affect the weight of the child, but concentrations of PCDDs/PCDFs (I-TEQ, 2,3,4,7,8-Cl5 dibenzofuran,1,2, 3,7,8-Cl5 dibenzodioxin) and PCBs [sum of PCBs (sumPCB), PCB-TEQ, and most PCB congeners] increased with advanced education. This is considered to be due to differences in the mother's consumption of fish. The birth weight, especially of boys, slightly decreased with increasing concentrations of I-TEQ, 2,3,4,7,8-Cl5 dibenzofuran, 1,2,3, 7,8-Cl5 dibenzodioxin, and 2,3,7,8-Cl4 dibenzodioxin; however, when the analysis was restricted to primiparae, there was no statistically significant correlation between birth weight and the concentrations of PCDDs/PCDFs. No correlation was found between the weight of the child and PCBs, PCB-TEQs, or individual PCB congeners in the whole material or among primiparae, or among boys or girls. The concentrations of PCDDs/PCDFs and PCBs inhuman milk were modeled for primiparae by weighing fish consumption, age of mother, milk fat content, and BMI before pregnancy. The linear regression resulted in values of R = 0.67 and 0.30 for the modeled dioxin I-TEQs in the urban and rural areas, respectively, and the corresponding values for sumPCBs of R = 0.60 and 0.11. The increase of PCDD/PCDF body burden was calculated to be on average 0.58 pg I-TEQ/g milk fat/year in the urban area and 0.39 pg I-TEQ/g milk fat/year in the rural area.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9432971 View in PubMed
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Body dimensions of infants exposed to antiepileptic drugs in utero: observations spanning 25 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58737
Source
Epilepsia. 2000 Jul;41(7):854-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
K. Wide
B. Winbladh
T. Tomson
B. Källén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Sachs' Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Epilepsia. 2000 Jul;41(7):854-61
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticonvulsants - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Birth Weight - drug effects
Body Height
Carbamazepine - adverse effects - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Embryonic and Fetal Development - drug effects
Epilepsy - drug therapy
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of maternal antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment on pregnancy duration, birth weight, body length, head circumference, and intrauterine growth in infants exposed in utero to antiepileptic drugs in Sweden between 1973-1997, with 963 singleton infants. METHODS: Data collected from (a) 1973-1981 (record linkage between a hospital discharge register and a medical birth register); (b) 1984-1995 (prospectively collected information in one defined catchment area with two delivery hospitals); and (c) 1995-1997 (medical birth register data). Observed numbers of infants below a defined size for body measurements compared with expected numbers calculated from all births in Sweden after stratification for year of birth, maternal age, parity, and education or smoking habits in early pregnancy. Standard deviation scores estimated with same stratification procedures. RESULTS: Fraction of monotherapy exposures increased from approximately 40% to approximately 90% from 1973 to 1997. Significantly increased numbers of infants with small body measurements found in exposed group. Negative influence on body dimensions decreased over time. More marked effects found in infants exposed to polytherapy. In monotherapy, only infants exposed to carbamazepine consistently showed reduction in body dimensions. Significant effect on gestational age in girls and on number of small for gestational age (
PubMed ID
10897157 View in PubMed
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Caffeine exposure during pregnancy, small for gestational age birth and neonatal outcome - results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301107
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Feb 26; 19(1):80
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-26-2019
Author
Dominika Modzelewska
Rino Bellocco
Anders Elfvin
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Bo Jacobsson
Verena Sengpiel
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, SE-416 85, Gothenburg, Sweden. dominika.modzelewska@gu.se.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Feb 26; 19(1):80
Date
Feb-26-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Weight - drug effects
Caffeine - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - chemically induced
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Logistic Models
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Norway
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - chemically induced
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Maternal caffeine intake has repeatedly been linked to babies being born small for gestational age (SGA). SGA babies are known to be at increased risk for adverse neonatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the associations between prenatal caffeine exposure and neonatal health.
The study is based on 67,569 full-term singleton mother-infant pairs from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Caffeine consumption from different sources was self-reported in gestational week 22. Neonatal compound outcomes, namely (1) morbidity/mortality and (2) neonatal intervention, were created based on the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Adjusted logistic regression was performed.
Caffeine exposure was associated to SGA (OR?=?1.16, 95%CI: 1.10; 1.23) and being born SGA was significantly associated with neonatal health (OR?=?3.09, 95%CI: 2.54; 3.78 for morbidity/mortality; OR?=?3.94, 95%CI: 3.50; 4.45 for intervention). However, prenatal caffeine exposure was neither associated with neonatal morbidity/mortality (OR?=?1.01, 95%CI: 0.96; 1.07) nor neonatal intervention (OR?=?1.02, 95%CI: 1.00; 1.05 for a 100?mg caffeine intake increase). Results did not change after additional adjustment for SGA status.
Moderate prenatal caffeine exposure (
PubMed ID
30808339 View in PubMed
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Decreased birthweight among infants born to women with a high dietary intake of fish contaminated with persistent organochlorine compounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35140
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1995 Oct;21(5):368-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
L. Rylander
U. Strömberg
L. Hagmar
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1995 Oct;21(5):368-75
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Benzofurans - adverse effects
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Oceans and Seas
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES--The purpose of the study was to assess reproductive outcomes, especially birthweight, and the consumption of fatty fish from the Baltic Sea, contaminated with persistent organochlorine compounds, among women from the Swedish east coast. MATERIAL AND METHODS--Cohorts of fishermen's wives from the Swedish east and west coasts were established and linked to the Swedish Medical Birth Register for 1973-1991; 1501 children were born in the eastcoast cohort and 3553 in the westcoast cohort. Comparisons were made with regional populations and between the cohorts. Dietary interviews were made with 69 randomly selected women from the cohorts and 69 referents. RESULTS--The women interviewed from the east- and westcoast cohorts ate locally caught fish more than twice as often as their referents. Compared with the regional population, the women in the eastcoast cohort gave birth to an increased number of infants with low birthweights (
PubMed ID
8571093 View in PubMed
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