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Adult health in the Russian Federation: more than just a health problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162459
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricio Marquez
Marc Suhrcke
Martin McKee
Lorenzo Rocco
Author Affiliation
World Bank. Washington, DC, USA. pmarquez@worldbank.org
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Birth Rate - trends
Chronic Disease - economics - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - trends
Female
Health Care Costs - trends
Health status
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk-Taking
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Conditions
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
In this paper we discuss the Russian adult health crisis and its implications. Although some hope that economic growth will trigger improvements in health, we argue that a scenario is more likely in which the unfavorable health status would become a barrier to economic growth. We also show that ill health is negatively affecting the economic well-being of individuals and households. We provide suggestions on interventions to improve health conditions in the Russian Federation, and we show that if health improvements are achieved, this will result in substantial economic gains in the future.
PubMed ID
17630447 View in PubMed
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Are low Danish fertility rates explained by changes in timing of births?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97766
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Jun;38(4):426-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Mette Gerster
Lisbeth B Knudsen
Niels Keiding
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. u.a.hvidtfeldt@biostat.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Jun;38(4):426-33
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Rate - trends
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Fertility
Humans
Maternal Age
Parity
Pregnancy
Reproductive Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: The most commonly used indicator of fertility, the period total fertility rate (TFR(p)), tends to underestimate actual fertility when women delay childbearing. The objective of this study was to examine to which extent fluctuations in Danish fertility rates result from changes in timing of births and, thus, whether the conventional TFR(p) is a distorted indicator of fertility quantum. In addition, we investigated whether such changes in timing explained the observed regional differences in the TFR(p) in Denmark. METHODS: The study applied age-, period-, county-, and parity-specific data from the Danish Fertility of Women and Couples Dataset, 1980-2001. We evaluated fluctuations in period fertility rates by the tempo-adjusted TFR(') - a proposed variant of the conventional TFR(p) taking period changes in timing of births into account. Tempo-effects were given by the difference between TFR(p) and TFR(') , and these period measures were compared to actual cohort fertility. RESULTS: Mean age at childbearing increased with more than 3 years over the period 1980-2001 leading to considerable differences between TFR(p) and TFR(' ) . A tempo-effect of up to 0.347 children per woman was observed. Comparisons with actual cohort fertility showed consistency with the TFR('). However, tempo-adjustment did not attenuate observed regional differences. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that the conventional TFR(p) consistently underestimates the fertility quantum in periods characterized by changes in timing of births, and that the TFR(' ) generally provides good indication of actual cohort quantum for the period in question. Considerable tempo-effects were observed within counties; however, differences between regions were not explained by changes in timing of births.
PubMed ID
20215486 View in PubMed
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Being born in Manitoba: a look at perinatal health issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186717
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93 Suppl 2:S33-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricia J Martens
Shelley Derksen
Teresa Mayer
Randy Walld
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB. Pat_Martens@cpe.umanitoba.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93 Suppl 2:S33-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Rate - trends
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Policy
Health promotion
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant Welfare - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Manitoba - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Regional Health Planning
Registries
Risk factors
Rural Health
Social Class
Urban health
Abstract
The Manitoba Centre for Health Policy was commissioned by Manitoba's provincial health department to examine the health of newborns born 1994 through 1998, using three indicators: preterm birth (
PubMed ID
12580388 View in PubMed
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Biometric analysis of the multiple maternities in Finland, 1881-1990, and in Sweden since 1751.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64820
Source
Hum Biol. 1993 Jun;65(3):463-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
J O Fellman
A W Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Population Genetics Unit, Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Hum Biol. 1993 Jun;65(3):463-79
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Rate - trends
Comparative Study
Finland
Humans
Linear Models
Maternal Age
Sweden
Triplets - statistics & numerical data
Twins - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Hellin's law states that if the twinning rate is w, then the triplet rate is w2, the quadruplet rate is w3, and so forth. The opinion of today is that Hellin's law holds only approximately. In this study the inaccuracy of Hellin's law is studied and the discrepancies are explained mathematically. In our earlier studies we built linear models for the twinning rate. Because most of the mothers are younger than 40 years of age and because in this age interval the twinning rate depends linearly on age, linear regression methods have been applied. Hellin's law suggests using the square-root transformation of the triplet rate r. Statistical arguments speak in favor of using the arcsin square root of r transformation. We discuss both transformations. Despite the fact that Hellin's law is only approximate, the arcsin transformation proves valuable. The transformed triplet rate can be modeled in a way similar to the twinning rate. We consider secular data from Finland for 1881-1990 and from Sweden since 1751. Using Hellin's law, we compare the triplet rates and the twinning rates and study the time trends of the observed twinning and triplet rates. The data are standardized. Our theoretical results are applied to multiple maternity data for Finland. Using maternal age as the regressor, we build a linear model for the twinning rate and for the arcsin-transformed triplet rate. This analysis shows a decreasing linear time trend in the triplet series for the period 1881-1950 but not in the twinning series. The triplet rate has an increasing trend after 1960, which seems to be mainly caused by artificial induction of ovulation.
PubMed ID
8319944 View in PubMed
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Birth rate among patients with epilepsy: a nationwide population-based cohort study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180008
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jun 1;159(11):1057-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2004
Author
M. Artama
J I T Isojärvi
J. Raitanen
A. Auvinen
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. miia.artama@uta.fi
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jun 1;159(11):1057-63
Date
Jun-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Rate - trends
Cohort Studies
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Abstract
Few reports on population-based studies of birth rate among epilepsy patients have been published. In most previous studies, fertility has been lower among epilepsy patients than in the rest of the population. However, conflicting results have also been reported. Because of small samples and selective material, the generalizability of these results is also limited. The authors conducted a population-based cohort study of birth rate (1985-2001) in a nationwide Finnish cohort of patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy and a population-based reference cohort. All patients (n = 14,077) approved as eligible for reimbursement for antiepileptic medication from the Social Insurance Institution of Finland (KELA) for the first time between 1985 and 1994 were identified from the KELA database. A reference cohort (n = 29,828) was identified from the Finnish Population Register Center, with frequency-matching on age. Information on follow-up status and livebirths were also obtained from the Finnish Population Register Center. The birth rate was lower in patients with epilepsy than in the reference cohort among both men (hazard ratio = 0.58, 95% confidence interval: 0.54, 0.62) and women (hazard ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval: 0.83, 0.93). There were a clear decreasing trend by age at observation in men with epilepsy and a moderate decreasing trend by age at start of follow-up in women with epilepsy.
PubMed ID
15155290 View in PubMed
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Birth rates among female cancer survivors: a population-based cohort study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116084
Source
Cancer. 2013 May 15;119(10):1892-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2013
Author
Mikael Hartman
Jenny Liu
Kamila Czene
Hui Miao
Kee Seng Chia
Agus Salim
Helena M Verkooijen
Author Affiliation
Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore. mikael_hartman@nuhs.edu.sg
Source
Cancer. 2013 May 15;119(10):1892-9
Date
May-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Birth Rate - trends
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Parity
Poisson Distribution
Pregnancy
Registries
Survivors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
More women of fertile age are long-term survivors of cancer. However, population-based data on birth rates of female cancer survivors are rare.
A total of 42,691 women = 45 years with a history of cancer were identified from the Swedish Multi-Generation Register and the Swedish Cancer Register, for whom relative birth rates were calculated as compared to the background population, ie, standardized birth ratios (SBRs). Independent factors associated with reduced birth rates among cancer survivors were estimated using Poisson modeling.
Compared to the background population, cancer survivors were 27% less likely to give birth (SBR = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.72-0.75). Large difference in SBRs existed by cancer site, with high SBRs for survivors of melanoma skin, thoracic, head and neck, and thyroid cancers, and low SBRs for reproductive, breast, brain and eye, and hematopoietic cancer survivors. Parity status at diagnosis affected fertility: women who already had a child at the time of diagnosis were less likely to give birth (SBR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.48-0.53) than were nulliparous women (SBR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.85-0.90). Multivariate analysis showed that cancer site (reproductive organs), age at onset of cancer (
PubMed ID
23436251 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Health Rep. 1990;2(1):86-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
S H Wadhera
Source
Health Rep. 1990;2(1):86-8
Date
1990
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Certificates
Birth Rate - trends
Canada
Fertility
Humans
Registries
PubMed ID
2102367 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(1):73-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
S. Wadhera
J. Strachan
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Health Information, Statistics Canada.
Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(1):73-7
Date
1992
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Birth Rate - trends
Canada
Female
Fertility
Humans
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
PubMed ID
1391656 View in PubMed
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Birth weight by gestational age for Albertan liveborn infants, 1985 through 1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188816
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Feb;24(2):138-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Charlene M T Robertson
Lawrence W Svenson
Janis M Kyle
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Feb;24(2):138-48
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Birth Rate - trends
Birth weight
Continental Population Groups
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Reference Values
Registries
Sex Characteristics
Twins - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
(1) To provide percentile tables and graphs of birth weight by gestational age and by gender, for singleton and twin liveborn neonates. (2) To determine changes in birth weight relative to gestational age over the study period.
Data on 556,775 singletons and 12,125 twins, born alive in Alberta from 1985 through 1998, were obtained from Alberta Registries - Vital Statistics. Mean birth weights for individual and grouped years were compared by independent two-tailed t-tests. Linear trends in birth weight over the 14-year period were obtained using one-way analyses of variance.
Four tables and corresponding graphs showing birth weight for gestational age by gender for 21 through 44 completed weeks gestation provide data for the 1st to 99th percentile. Changes in birth weight for the combined gestational ages included an increase for singletons (male, F 17.6, p
PubMed ID
12196879 View in PubMed
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Can increased use of ART retrieve the Czech Republic from the low fertility trap?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98496
Source
Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2009;30(6):739-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jirina Kocourkova
Tomas Fait
Author Affiliation
Department of Demography and Geodemography, Faculty of Science, Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. koc@natur.cuni.cz
Source
Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2009;30(6):739-48
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Rate - trends
Contraception - utilization
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - therapy
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - utilization
Risk factors
Triplets
Twins
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the importance of increased use of assisted reproduction technologies (ART) for the fertility trends in the Czech Republic. DATA AND METHODS: Comparative analysis based on demographic and ART data was used. Demographic data have been published by EUROSTAT and the Czech Statistical Office. ART data have collected by ESHRE. FINDINGS: In the 1990s a trend towards later childbearing contributed greatly to the decline in total fertility rate (TFR) in the Czech Republic. Recently, recuperation of delayed births has resulted in the increase of TFR to 1.5 children per woman which is considered to be a critical minimum level. The highest increase in fertility rates occurred in the age group of 35-39, in which the contribution of ART treatments usually is greatest. Moreover, a substantial increase of multiple births has been registered. In 2005 the estimated share of children born after ART in the Czech Republic (3%) was close to countries with the highest share (Nordic countries, Belgium or Slovenia). However, the Czech Republic registered only half the number of ART cycles per million inhabitants than in those countries. Contrary to Nordic countries the Czech Republic faced an extremely low TFR of 1.28 children per woman. As the estimation of average number of cycles suggests, the need for fertility treatment has not been met in the Czech Republic yet. Moreover, due to the continuous postponement of childbearing to higher women s age, demand for ART treatment will be even higher in the near future and will probably result in the need of more than 2 500 cycles per million inhabitants in the Czech Republic. CONCLUSIONS: Spreading of ART is particularly relevant in the countries caught in the low fertility trap as higher impact on fertility trends could be expected. In the Czech Republic there is a chance to get over the critical level of TFR if comprehensive population policy including the improved access to ART based on well-considered strategy with explicit aim to optimize the quality of health care was accepted. However, from the demographic perspective the risk of further delay of childbearing encouraged by ART treatment should be taken into account while making these decisions.
PubMed ID
20038934 View in PubMed
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100 records – page 1 of 10.