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Advice seeking and appropriate use of a pediatric emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220581
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Aug;147(8):863-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
T F Oberlander
I B Pless
G E Dougherty
Author Affiliation
Department of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Aug;147(8):863-7
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Algorithms
Birth Order
Child
Child, Preschool
Counseling - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Pediatric - utilization
Hospitals, Teaching - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parents - education - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
To determine whether seeking advice prior to an unscheduled visit to a pediatric emergency department (PED) influences appropriate use of this setting for minor illnesses.
Cross-sectional questionnaire survey.
The medical emergency department of the Montreal (Quebec) Children's Hospital, a major referral and urban teaching hospital.
Four hundred eighty-nine of 562 consecutive parents visiting the PED over two periods, one in February and the other in July 1989.
None.
Parents of children between 0 and 18 years of age visiting the PED were asked whether they had previously sought advice from family, friends, or a physician. Other factors possibly related to the decision to seek care were also measured. Appropriateness was rated, blind to discharge diagnosis, by two pediatricians using a structured series of questions incorporating the child's age, time of the visit, clinical state, and problem at presentation. Thirty-four percent of visits among respondents were judged appropriate. In bivariate analysis, appropriate visits occurred significantly more often when a parent spoke to both a physician and a nonphysician (47%) prior to visiting the PED than when no advice was sought (29%; P
PubMed ID
8352220 View in PubMed
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Anencephaly and spina bifida in the Province of Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110114
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1969 Apr 26;100(16):748-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-1969
Author
I. Horowitz
A D McDonald
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1969 Apr 26;100(16):748-55
Date
Apr-26-1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anencephaly - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Birth Order
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Geography
Humans
Infant mortality
Jews
Male
Maternal Age
Parity
Pregnancy
Quebec
Rural Population
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Spinal Dysraphism - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Urban Population
Notes
Cites: Br J Prev Soc Med. 1964 Jul;18:152-614198229
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Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 1964 Jun;6:231-4014155181
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1964 Feb;39:41-5714160086
PubMed ID
4888983 View in PubMed
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Antibodies to herpes simplex and Epstein-Barr viruses in Faroese children: association with sibship size, height and age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26900
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [B]. 1983 Oct;91(5):339-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1983
Author
H. Isager
J. Cohn
J. Hesse
B F Vestergaard
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [B]. 1983 Oct;91(5):339-41
Date
Oct-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Birth Order
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Family Characteristics
Female
Herpesvirus 4, Human - immunology
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotyping
Simplexvirus - immunology
Abstract
Antibody to herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) capsid antibody were determined in 333 children from the Faroe Islands, aged 4, 8 and 13 years. An analysis of multi-way frequency tables was performed, testing seropositivity for each virus against combinations of the following variables: sibship size, birth order, mother's age at birth, birth weight, actual height and weight, age and sex. HSV-seropositivity was associated to sibship size, height and age, while EBV-seropositivity was related only to age.--It is discussed how the findings fit into epidemiological patterns described for Hodgkin's disease and multiple sclerosis, which are both supposed to be of viral origin. Our results suggest that HSV, but not EBV, may be among the candidates to be considered.
PubMed ID
6318512 View in PubMed
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Are the cause(s) responsible for urban-rural differences in schizophrenia risk rooted in families or in individuals?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169423
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jun 1;163(11):971-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2006
Author
Carsten B Pedersen
Preben Bo Mortensen
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Register-based Research, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. cbp@ncrr.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jun 1;163(11):971-8
Date
Jun-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Birth Order
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Family
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Risk factors
Rural Population - trends
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Social Environment
Urban Population - trends
Abstract
Many studies have identified urban-rural differences in schizophrenia risk. Hypothetical underlying cause(s) may include toxic exposures, diet, infections, and selective migration. The authors investigated whether the underlying cause(s) responsible for the urban-rural differences were rooted in families or in individuals. Linking data from the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, a population-based cohort of 711,897 people aged 15 years or more was established. Overall, 2,720 persons developed schizophrenia during the period 1970-2001. The authors evaluated whether the nearest older sibling's place of birth had an independent effect on schizophrenia risk. If the cause(s) responsible for the urban-rural differences are rooted in individuals only, the nearest older sibling's place of birth should have no independent effect. In this analysis, the nearest older sibling's place of birth had an independent effect; among persons who lived in a rural area during their first 15 years of life, the relative risk was 1.59 (95% confidence interval: 1.10, 2.30) if their nearest older sibling had been born in the capital area as compared with a rural area. Some of the cause(s) responsible for the urban-rural differences in schizophrenia risk are rooted in families, but some might also be rooted in individuals.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jun 1;163(11):979-8116675534
PubMed ID
16675535 View in PubMed
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Association between birth order and emergency room visits and acute hospital admissions following pediatric vaccination: a self-controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105745
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e81070
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Steven Hawken
Jeffrey C Kwong
Shelley L Deeks
Natasha S Crowcroft
Robin Ducharme
Douglas G Manuel
Kumanan Wilson
Author Affiliation
ICES uOttawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada ; Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada ; Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e81070
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Order
Child
Child, Preschool
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Haemophilus Vaccines - adverse effects
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated - adverse effects
Vaccination
Vaccines, Conjugate - adverse effects
Abstract
We investigated the association between a child's birth order and emergency room (ER) visits and hospital admissions following 2-,4-,6- and 12-month pediatric vaccinations.
We included all children born in Ontario between April 1(st), 2006 and March 31(st), 2009 who received a qualifying vaccination. We identified vaccinations, ER visits and admissions using health administrative data housed at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. We used the self-controlled case series design to compare the relative incidence (RI) of events among 1(st)-born and later-born children using relative incidence ratios (RIR).
For the 2-month vaccination, the RIR for 1(st)-borns versus later-born children was 1.37 (95% CI: 1.19-1.57), which translates to 112 additional events/100,000 vaccinated. For the 4-month vaccination, the RIR for 1(st)-borns vs. later-borns was 1.70 (95% CI: 1.45-1.99), representing 157 additional events/100,000 vaccinated. At 6 months, the RIR for 1(st) vs. later-borns was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.09-1.48), or 77 excess events/100,000 vaccinated. At the 12-month vaccination, the RIR was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.02-1.21), or 249 excess events/100,000 vaccinated.
Birth order is associated with increased incidence of ER visits and hospitalizations following vaccination in infancy. 1(st)-born children had significantly higher relative incidence of events compared to later-born children.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Nov 1;156(9):882; author reply 883-412397007
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2002 Mar;56(3):209-1711854343
Cites: Vaccine. 2003 Sep 8;21(25-26):3863-612922120
Cites: J Soc Psychol. 1984 Jun;123(1ST Half):123-96482396
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Nov 18;299(6710):1259-602513902
Cites: J Pediatr Psychol. 1993 Jun;18(3):397-4088340847
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Cites: Stat Med. 2006 May 30;25(10):1768-9716220518
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Cites: Curr Med Res Opin. 2008 Jun;24(6):1719-4118474148
Cites: CJEM. 2008 May;10(3):224-4319019273
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Jan 15;171(2):177-8819965887
Cites: Vaccine. 2011 May 12;29(21):3746-5221443964
Cites: Vaccine. 2011 Oct 26;29(46):8267-7421907256
Cites: Placenta. 2011 Nov;32(11):92221641032
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(12):e2789722174753
Cites: Vaccine. 2012 Sep 21;30(43):6115-2022709951
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Dec 1;176(11):1035-4223118103
Cites: Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2013 May;9(5):1153-723328278
Cites: Pediatrics. 2000 Nov;106(5):E6211061799
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Nov 15;154(10):909-1511700245
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Nov 1;156(9):882; author reply 883-412397008
PubMed ID
24324662 View in PubMed
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The association between height and birth order: evidence from 652,518 Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256596
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 Jul;67(7):571-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Mikko Myrskylä
Karri Silventoinen
Aline Jelenkovic
Per Tynelius
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Max Planck Research Group Lifecourse Dynamics and Demographic Change, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany. myrskyla@demogr.mpg.de
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 Jul;67(7):571-7
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Order
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Height - genetics - physiology
Cohort Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Military Personnel
Registries
Regression Analysis
Siblings
Social Class
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Birth order is associated with outcomes such as birth weight and adult socioeconomic position (SEP), but little is known about the association with adult height. This potential birth order-height association is important because height predicts health, and because the association may help explain population-level height trends. We studied the birth order-height association and whether it varies by family characteristics or birth cohort.
We used the Swedish Military Conscription Register to analyse adult height among 652,518 men born in 1951-1983 using fixed effects regression models that compare brothers and account for genetic and social factors shared by brothers. We stratified the analysis by family size, parental SEP and birth cohort. We compared models with and without birth weight and birth length controls.
Unadjusted analyses showed no differences between the first two birth orders but in the fixed effects regression, birth orders 2, 3 and 4 were associated with 0.4, 0.7 and 0.8 cm (p
PubMed ID
23645856 View in PubMed
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Association of birth outcome with subsequent fertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60378
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Oct 15;147(4):399-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1983
Author
T. Bjerkedal
J D Erickson
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Oct 15;147(4):399-404
Date
Oct-15-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Order
Family Characteristics
Female
Fertility
Fetal Death
Humans
Infant mortality
Male
Maternal Age
Norway
Parents - psychology
Pregnancy
Sex Factors
Twins
Abstract
The association between birth outcome and subsequent fertility was analyzed by using linked Norwegian birth certificates. All births of order 1, 2, and 3 which occurred during 1967 through 1974 were considered index births; there were approximately 207,000 index births of order 1, 165,000 of order 2, and 87,000 of order 3. The mothers' fertility after these index births was summarized with a life-table technique. Fertility was most pronounced if there were no survivors of an index birth, intermediate if there was one survivor, and lowest if both members of a set of twins survived. Advanced maternal age was associated with markedly reduced fertility. The sex of a surviving singleton had little effect on a mother's subsequent fertility. However, there was a sex-related difference if index twins survived; fertility was lower after the birth of unlike-sex twins and higher after the birth of like-sex twins. This probably reflects reproductive limitation rather than a differential fecundity for mothers of dizygotic and monozygotic twins. A comparison of fertility after births of like-sex and unlike-sex twins with one survivor may indicate that mothers of dizygotic twins were more fertile, but the number available for study was small. Reproduction among women who had two index births during 1967 through 1974 was examined separately. Fertility was most marked if neither of the first two infants survived and lowest where three survived (i.e., where one of the index births involved twins). If there were two survivors, the sex composition of the pair influenced fertility; fertility was greater if the two survivors were of the same sex and lower if they were of unlike sex. Since a woman who has an unfavorable outcome in one pregnancy will be at a higher risk of having an unfavorable outcome in a subsequent pregnancy, the higher fertility of such women will, to some degree, inflate the frequency of unfavorable outcomes in a population of births.
PubMed ID
6684885 View in PubMed
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264 records – page 1 of 27.