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Abdominal wall defects in Denmark, 1970-89.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31708
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):73-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Bugge
N V Holm
Author Affiliation
Wilhelm Johannsen Centre for Functional Genome Research, Department of Medical Genetics, Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. MB@IMBG.ku.dk
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):73-81
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - abnormalities
Birth Certificates
Cohort Studies
Death Certificates
Denmark - epidemiology
Fetal Death - epidemiology - etiology
Gastroschisis - classification - epidemiology
Hernia, Umbilical - classification - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In the last two to three decades, increasing rates of gastroschisis but not of omphalocele have been reported from different parts of the world. The present study represents a register containing 469 children born with abdominal wall defects based on data retrieved from 20 birth cohorts (1970-89) in three nationwide registries. A tentative estimate of the completeness as regards identification of liveborn and stillborn infants is a minimum of 95% and 90% respectively. All cases were reclassified to 166 cases of gastroschisis, 258 of omphalocele and 16 of gross abdominal wall defect. The average point prevalence at birth of gastroschisis was 1.33 per 10 000 live and stillbirths. During the first decade, an increase in prevalence occurred culminating in 1976, followed by a decrease reaching its initial value in 1983 and then a new increase. Overall, no significant linear trend could be demonstrated for the entire period. The average point prevalence at birth for omphalocele was 2.07 and for gross abdominal wall defect 0.12 per 10 000 live and stillbirths with no significant change in the period. The geographical distribution of gastroschisis and omphalocele showed no difference per county.
PubMed ID
11856457 View in PubMed
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Access to information for adult adoptees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226501
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 15;144(8):958-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1991
Author
K. Kimbell
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 15;144(8):958-60
Date
Apr-15-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Adult
Birth Certificates
Canada
Confidentiality
Humans
Records as Topic
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1991 Oct 15;145(8):9231913424
PubMed ID
2009473 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and correlates of maternal recall of birthweight and gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85768
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jun;115(7):886-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Adegboye A R A
Heitmann Bl
Author Affiliation
University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Research in Childhood Health, Denmark. aar@ipm.regionh.dk
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jun;115(7):886-93
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth Certificates
Birth Weight - physiology
Child
Denmark
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Mothers - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of maternal recall of children birthweight (BW) and gestational age (GA), using the Danish Medical Birth Register (DBR) as reference and to examine the reliability of recalled BW and its potential correlates. DESIGN: Comparison of data from the DBR and the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS). SETTING: Schools in Odense, Denmark. POPULATION: A total of 1271 and 678 mothers of school children participated with information in the accuracy studies of BW and GA, respectively. The reliability sample of BW was composed of 359 women. METHOD: The agreement between the two sources was evaluated by mean differences (MD), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman's plots. The misclassification of the various BW and GA categories were also estimated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Differences between recalled and registered BW and GA. RESULTS: There was high agreement between recalled and registered BW (MD =-0.2 g; ICC = 0.94) and GA (MD = 0.3 weeks; ICC = 0.76). Only 1.6% of BW would have been misclassified into low, normal or high BW and 16.5% of GA would have been misclassified into preterm, term or post-term based on maternal recall. The logistic regression revealed that the most important variables in the discordance between recalled and registered BW were ethnicity and parity. Maternal recall of BW was highly reliable (MD =-5.5 g; ICC = 0.93), and reliability remained high across subgroups. CONCLUSION: Maternal recall of BW and GA seems to be sufficiently accurate for clinical and epidemiological use.
PubMed ID
18485168 View in PubMed
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Adult body height of twins compared with that of singletons: a register-based birth cohort study of Norwegian males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115100
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 1;177(9):1015-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2013
Author
Willy Eriksen
Jon M Sundet
Kristian Tambs
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 1;177(9):1015-9
Date
May-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth Certificates
Body Height - genetics
Cohort Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Regression Analysis
Siblings
Twins
Young Adult
Abstract
In the present study, we evaluated whether childhood differences in body height between singletons and twins persist into adulthood. Data from the Medical Birth Register of Norway were linked with data from the Norwegian National Conscript Service. This study used data on the 457,999 males who were born alive and without physical anomalies in single or twin births in Norway during 1967-1984 and who were examined at the mandatory military conscription (age 18-20 years; 1985-2003). For sibling comparisons, the authors selected the 1,721 sibships of full brothers that included at least 1 male born in a single birth and at least 1 male born in a twin birth (4,520 persons, including 2,493 twins and 2,027 singletons). An analysis of the total study population using generalized estimating equations showed that the twins were 0.6 cm (95% confidence interval: 0.4, 0.7) shorter than were the singletons after adjustment for a series of background factors. The fixed-effects regression analysis of the sibships that included both twins and singletons showed that the twins were 0.9 cm (95% confidence interval: 0.6, 1.2) shorter than were their singleton brothers. The study suggests that male twins born in Norway during 1967-1984 were slightly shorter in early adulthood than were singletons.
PubMed ID
23543161 View in PubMed
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Advanced Maternal Age and the Risk of Low Birth Weight and Preterm Delivery: a Within-Family Analysis Using Finnish Population Registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287605
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Dec 01;186(11):1219-1226
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2017
Author
Alice Goisis
Hanna Remes
Kieron Barclay
Pekka Martikainen
Mikko Myrskylä
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Dec 01;186(11):1219-1226
Date
Dec-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Certificates
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Siblings
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
Advanced maternal age at birth is considered a major risk factor for birth outcomes. It is unclear to what extent this association is confounded by maternal characteristics. To test whether advanced maternal age at birth independently increases the risk of low birth weight (
PubMed ID
29206985 View in PubMed
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Adverse Infant Outcomes Associated with Discordant Gestational Age Estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281353
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2016 11;30(6):541-549
Publication Type
Article
Date
11-2016
Author
Nils-Halvdan Morken
Rolv Skjaerven
Jennifer L Richards
Michael R Kramer
Sven Cnattingius
Stefan Johansson
Mika Gissler
Siobhan M Dolan
Jennifer Zeitlin
Michael S Kramer
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2016 11;30(6):541-549
Date
11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Birth Certificates
Data Accuracy
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Premature - physiology
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Sweden
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
United States
Abstract
Gestational age estimation by last menstrual period (LMP) vs. ultrasound (or best obstetric estimate in the US) may result in discrepant classification of preterm vs. term birth. We investigated whether such discrepancies are associated with adverse infant outcomes.
We studied singleton livebirths in the Medical Birth Registries of Norway, Sweden and Finland and US live birth certificates from 1999 to the most recent year available. Risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) by discordant and concordant gestational age estimation for infant, neonatal and post-neonatal mortality, Apgar score
PubMed ID
27555359 View in PubMed
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Analyzing sibship correlations in birth weight using large sibships from Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52712
Source
Genet Epidemiol. 1997;14(4):423-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
T H Beaty
R. Skjaerven
D R Breazeale
K Y Liang
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.
Source
Genet Epidemiol. 1997;14(4):423-33
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Certificates
Birth weight
Cluster analysis
Female
Genotype
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Likelihood Functions
Linear Models
Male
Maternal Age
Models, Statistical
Norway
Nuclear Family
Parity
Pregnancy
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway were used to estimate sibship correlations in large sibships (each with > or = 5 infants among singleton live births surviving the first year of life), while adjusting for covariates such as infant gender, gestational age, maternal age, parity, and time since last pregnancy. This sample of 12,356 full sibs in 2,462 sibships born in Norway between 1968 and 1989 was selected to maximize the information on parity, and a robust approach to estimating both regression coefficients and the sibship correlation using generalized estimating equations (GEE) was employed. In concordance with previous studies, these data showed a high overall correlation in birth weight among full sibs (0.48 +/- 0.01), but this sibship correlation was influenced by parity. In particular, the correlation between the firstborn infant and a subsequent infant was slightly lower than between two subsequent sibs (0.44 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.50 +/- 0.01, respectively). The effect of time between pregnancies was statistically significant, but its predicted impact was modest over the period in which most of these large families were completed. While these data cannot discriminate whether factors influencing birth weight are maternal or fetal in nature, this analysis does illustrate how robust statistical models can be used to estimate sibship correlations while adjusting for covariates in family studies.
PubMed ID
9271714 View in PubMed
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Assessing record linkage between health care and Vital Statistics databases using deterministic methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169901
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2006;6:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Bing Li
Hude Quan
Andrew Fong
Mingshan Lu
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1, Canada. LIB@UCALGARY.CA
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2006;6:48
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Birth Certificates
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Death Certificates
Female
Hospital Records - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Patient Identification Systems
Population Surveillance
Public Health Informatics
Registries
Vital statistics
Abstract
We assessed the linkage and correct linkage rate using deterministic record linkage among three commonly used Canadian databases, namely, the population registry, hospital discharge data and Vital Statistics registry.
Three combinations of four personal identifiers (surname, first name, sex and date of birth) were used to determine the optimal combination. The correct linkage rate was assessed using a unique personal health number available in all three databases.
Among the three combinations, the combination of surname, sex, and date of birth had the highest linkage rate of 88.0% and 93.1%, and the second highest correct linkage rate of 96.9% and 98.9% between the population registry and Vital Statistics registry, and between the hospital discharge data and Vital Statistics registry in 2001, respectively. Adding the first name to the combination of the three identifiers above increased correct linkage by less than 1%, but at the cost of lowering the linkage rate almost by 10%.
Our findings suggest that the combination of surname, sex and date of birth appears to be optimal using deterministic linkage. The linkage and correct linkage rates appear to vary by age and the type of database, but not by sex.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16597337 View in PubMed
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Association between air pollution and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Vancouver.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178037
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):A792; author reply A792-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
John A Bukowski
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):A792; author reply A792-4
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - poisoning
Birth Certificates
British Columbia - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 May 15;143(10):1069-788629614
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PubMed ID
15471710 View in PubMed
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The association between low birth weight and type 2 diabetes: contribution of genetic factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92433
Source
Epidemiology. 2008 Sep;19(5):659-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Johansson Stefan
Iliadou Anastasia
Bergvall Niklas
dé Fairé Ulf
Kramer Michael S
Pawitan Yudi
Pedersen Nancy L
Norman Mikael
Lichtenstein Paul
Cnattingius Sven
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medical Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 2008 Sep;19(5):659-65
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Certificates
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Low birth weight has been associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. Poor fetal nutrition has been suggested to explain this association. Our objective was to determine whether genetic factors contribute to the association between low birth weight and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We retrieved information from original birth records on same-sex Swedish twins with known zygosity, born from 1926 to 1958. We used regression models to investigate whether birth weight was associated with risk of type 2 diabetes in the cohort of twins overall, and in case-control analyses within disease-discordant dizygotic and monozygotic twin pairs. RESULTS: Of 18,230 twins, 592 (3.2%) had type 2 diabetes. The rate of type 2 diabetes consistently increased with decreasing birth weight, from 2.4% among twins with birth weights of 3500 g or more to 5.3% among those with birth weights less than 2000 g. In the cohort analysis, in which twins are analyzed as independent individuals, the adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of type 2 diabetes per 500-g decrease in birth weight was 1.44 (1.28-1.63). When we compared the diseased twin with the healthy cotwin, the corresponding odds ratios were 1.38 (1.02-1.85), among dizygotic twins, and 1.02 (0.63-1.64), among monozygotic twins. CONCLUSIONS: Low birth weight is associated with type 2 diabetes in adulthood. The difference in this association between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs suggests that genetic mechanisms play an important role in this association.
PubMed ID
18714437 View in PubMed
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121 records – page 1 of 13.