Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Additive effects of childhood abuse and cannabis abuse on clinical expressions of bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261461
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jun;44(8):1653-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
M. Aas
B. Etain
F. Bellivier
C. Henry
T. Lagerberg
A. Ringen
I. Agartz
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jun;44(8):1653-62
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies of bipolar disorders indicate that childhood abuse and substance abuse are associated with the disorder. Whether both influence the clinical picture, or if one is mediating the association of the other, has not previously been investigated.
A total of 587 patients with bipolar disorders were recruited from Norway and France. A history of childhood abuse was obtained using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Diagnosis and clinical variables, including substance abuse, were based on structured clinical interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders or French version of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies).
Cannabis abuse was significantly associated with childhood abuse, specifically emotional and sexual abuse (? 2 = 8.63, p = 0.003 and ? 2 = 7.55, p = 0.006, respectively). Cannabis abuse was significantly associated with earlier onset of the illness (z = -4.17, p
PubMed ID
24028906 View in PubMed
Less detail

Affective lability mediates the association between childhood trauma and suicide attempts, mixed episodes and co-morbid anxiety disorders in bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287299
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M. Aas
C. Henry
F. Bellivier
M. Lajnef
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
T V Lagerberg
S R Aminoff
T. Bjella
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
B. Etain
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Many studies have shown associations between a history of childhood trauma and more severe or complex clinical features of bipolar disorders (BD), including suicide attempts and earlier illness onset. However, the psychopathological mechanisms underlying these associations are still unknown. Here, we investigated whether affective lability mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and the severe clinical features of BD.
A total of 342 participants with BD were recruited from France and Norway. Diagnosis and clinical characteristics were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) or the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Affective lability was measured using the short form of the Affective Lability Scale (ALS-SF). A history of childhood trauma was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Mediation analyses were performed using the SPSS process macro.
Using the mediation model and covariation for the lifetime number of major mood episodes, affective lability was found to statistically mediate the relationship between childhood trauma experiences and several clinical variables, including suicide attempts, mixed episodes and anxiety disorders. No significant mediation effects were found for rapid cycling or age at onset.
Our data suggest that affective lability may represent a psychological dimension that mediates the association between childhood traumatic experiences and the risk of a more severe or complex clinical expression of BD.
PubMed ID
27894372 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bipolar disorder in children and adolescents: international perspective on epidemiology and phenomenology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29267
Source
Bipolar Disord. 2005 Dec;7(6):497-506
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
César A Soutullo
Kiki D Chang
Azucena Díez-Suárez
Ana Figueroa-Quintana
Inmaculada Escamilla-Canales
Marta Rapado-Castro
Felipe Ortuño
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Unit, Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Clínica Universitaria, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. csoutullo@unav.es
Source
Bipolar Disord. 2005 Dec;7(6):497-506
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Epidemiologic Studies
Humans
International Classification of Diseases - statistics & numerical data
Internationality
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There is considerable skepticism outside the US over the prevalence of pediatric bipolar disorder (BD). We wished to evaluate the epidemiology of BD in children and adolescents in non-US samples. METHOD: We reviewed studies on the prevalence of BD in children and adolescents in international samples. We also describe our sample of 27 children with BD at the University of Navarra. RESULTS: There are important and frequently overlooked differences in the definition of BD between the International Classification of Diseases 10th edition (ICD-10) and DSM-IV and methodological differences in epidemiological studies that may partially explain international differences in prevalence of pediatric BD. The prevalence of bipolar spectrum disorder in young adults in Switzerland is 11%. In Holland the 6-month prevalence of mania in adolescents was 1.9% and of hypomania 0.9%. Only 1.2% of hospitalized youth (
PubMed ID
16403175 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reproductive patterns in psychotic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142668
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Aug;121(1-3):234-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
T M Laursen
T. Munk-Olsen
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Taasingegade 1, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. tml@ncrr.dk
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Aug;121(1-3):234-40
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - methods
Adolescent
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Birth rate
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fertility
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parturition - physiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Reproduction - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Longitudinal epidemiological studies have shown worse outcomes in patients with psychotic disorder than in the general population. The reproductive pattern may be seen as a measure of outcome following psychotic disorder onset, and it may be measured as the rate of child births where the rate is a proxy measure of well-being.
To examine reproductive patterns following psychotic disorder onset by comparing the fertility rates of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with those of other psychiatric patients and the general population, taking into account parental status at disease-onset, time since onset, and the possible effect of abortions-rates.
A prospective register-based cohort study drawing on the entire Danish population born after 1950. Incidence Rate Ratios (IRRs) of fertility were analysed using survival analysis.
Compared with the general population, the lowest first-child fertility rate was found among men (IRR=0.10) and women (IRR=0.18) with schizophrenia. In comparison, bipolar male patients had an IRR=0.32 and female patients an IRR=0.36, while male unipolar patients had an IRR=0.46 and female patients an IRR=0.57. In the group with other psychiatric disorders men had an IRR=0.51 and women an IRR=0.70.
The results of the present study show a selection process where persons with more severe disorders are less likely to become parents. The reduced fertility was strongly influenced by the time since psychiatric disorder onset; thus, the longer the time since onset, the higher the fertility.
PubMed ID
20570491 View in PubMed
Less detail

Social Rhythm and Mental Health: A Cross-Cultural Comparison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274953
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(3):e0150312
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Jürgen Margraf
Kristen Lavallee
XiaoChi Zhang
Silvia Schneider
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(3):e0150312
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Social Skills
Surveys and Questionnaires
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Social rhythm refers to the regularity with which one engages in social activities throughout the week, and has established links with bipolar disorder, as well as some links with depression and anxiety. The aim of the present study is to examine social rhythm and its relationship to various aspects of health, including physical health, negative mental health, and positive mental health.
Questionnaire data were obtained from a large-scale multi-national sample of 8095 representative participants from the U.S., Russia, and Germany.
Results indicated that social rhythm irregularity is related to increased reporting of health problems, depression, anxiety, and stress. In contrast, greater regularity is related to better overall health state, life satisfaction, and positive mental health. The effects are generally small in size, but hold even when controlling for gender, marital status, education, income, country, and social support. Further, social rhythm means differ across Russia, the U.S., and Germany. Relationships with mental health are present in all three countries, but differ in magnitude.
Social rhythm irregularity is related to mental health in Russia, the U.S., and Germany.
Notes
Cites: BMC Psychol. 2016;4:826865173
Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;21(11):1144-5323567367
Cites: J Sleep Res. 1994 Dec;3(4):196-20510607126
Cites: Psychol Med. 2000 Sep;30(5):1005-1612027038
Cites: Psychol Med. 2002 May;32(4):585-9412102373
Cites: J Sleep Res. 2002 Sep;11(3):183-9012220313
Cites: Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2003;12(1):3-2112830306
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1988 Oct;45(10):948-523048226
Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 1990 Feb;178(2):120-62299336
Cites: Health Policy. 1990 Dec;16(3):199-20810109801
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 1991 Feb;36(2):195-2072017534
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 1992 Jun;42(3):221-301496054
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 1994 Jan;51(1):33-498197270
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 1995 Mar;33(3):335-437726811
Cites: Health Policy. 1996 Jul;37(1):53-7210158943
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 1996 May 17;62(2):161-98771613
Cites: Anxiety. 1994;1(2):90-59160553
Cites: Br J Clin Psychol. 2005 Jun;44(Pt 2):227-3916004657
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;62(9):996-100416143731
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 2006 Jan 30;141(1):103-1416360217
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;188:359-6516582063
Cites: J Health Psychol. 2006 Sep;11(5):643-5416908463
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2006 Oct;26(6):679-9416904251
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Apr;64(4):419-2617404119
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2007 Sep;164(9):1340-717728418
Cites: Bipolar Disord. 2008 Jun;10(4):520-918452448
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2009 Feb;26(2):337-4719212845
Cites: Encephale. 2009 Jan;35 Suppl 2:S72-519268175
Cites: Behav Ther. 2009 Jun;40(2):131-4119433144
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2011 Dec;135(1-3):384-821708409
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2012 Feb;121(1):282-821842958
Cites: Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2012 Mar;58(2):166-7121106604
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2012 Aug;139(3):264-7222381951
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2013;34:119-3823514317
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2013 Sep;22(7):1717-2723184421
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2000 Sep 15;48(6):593-60411018230
PubMed ID
26954568 View in PubMed
Less detail

Temperament, character, and suicide attempts in unipolar and bipolar mood disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274602
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2016 Feb;77(2):252-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Pekka J Jylhä
Tom Rosenström
Outi Mantere
Kirsi Suominen
Tarja K Melartin
Maria S Vuorilehto
Mikael K Holma
Kirsi A Riihimäki
Maria A Oquendo
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Erkki T Isometsä
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2016 Feb;77(2):252-60
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Character
Depression - epidemiology - physiopathology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Dysthymic Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Temperament - physiology
Abstract
Personality features may indicate risk for both mood disorders and suicidal acts. How dimensions of temperament and character predispose to suicide attempts remains unclear.
Patients (n = 597) from 3 prospective cohort studies (Vantaa Depression Study [VDS], Jorvi Bipolar Study [JoBS], and Vantaa Primary Care Depression Study [PC-VDS]) were interviewed at baseline, at 18 months, and, in VDS and PC-VDS, at 5 years (1997-2003). Personality was measured with the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised (TCI-R), and follow-up time spent in major depressive episodes (MDEs) as well as lifetime (total) and prospectively ascertained suicide attempts during the follow-up were documented.
Overall, 219 patients had 718 lifetime suicide attempts; 88 patients had 242 suicide attempts during the prospective follow-up. The numbers of both the total and prospective suicide attempts were associated with low self-directedness (ß = -0.266, P = .004, and ß = -0.294, P
PubMed ID
26797163 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.