Skip header and navigation

Refine By

175 records – page 1 of 18.

Absolute risk of suicide after first hospital contact in mental disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130761
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;68(10):1058-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Merete Nordentoft
Preben Bo Mortensen
Carsten Bøcker Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Denmark. mn@dadlnet.dk
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;68(10):1058-64
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Estimates of lifetime risk of suicide in mental disorders were based on selected samples with incomplete follow-up.
To estimate, in a national cohort, the absolute risk of suicide within 36 years after the first psychiatric contact.
Prospective study of incident cases followed up for as long as 36 years. Median follow-up was 18 years.
Individual data drawn from Danish longitudinal registers.
A total of 176,347 persons born from January 1, 1955, through December 31, 1991, were followed up from their first contact with secondary mental health services after 15 years of age until death, emigration, disappearance, or the end of 2006. For each participant, 5 matched control individuals were included.
Absolute risk of suicide in percentage of individuals up to 36 years after the first contact.
Among men, the absolute risk of suicide (95% confidence interval [CI]) was highest for bipolar disorder, (7.77%; 6.01%-10.05%), followed by unipolar affective disorder (6.67%; 5.72%-7.78%) and schizophrenia (6.55%; 5.85%-7.34%). Among women, the highest risk was found among women with schizophrenia (4.91%; 95% CI, 4.03%-5.98%), followed by bipolar disorder (4.78%; 3.48%-6.56%). In the nonpsychiatric population, the risk was 0.72% (95% CI, 0.61%-0.86%) for men and 0.26% (0.20%-0.35%) for women. Comorbid substance abuse and comorbid unipolar affective disorder significantly increased the risk. The co-occurrence of deliberate self-harm increased the risk approximately 2-fold. Men with bipolar disorder and deliberate self-harm had the highest risk (17.08%; 95% CI, 11.19%-26.07%).
This is the first analysis of the absolute risk of suicide in a total national cohort of individuals followed up from the first psychiatric contact, and it represents, to our knowledge, the hitherto largest sample with the longest and most complete follow-up. Our estimates are lower than those most often cited, but they are still substantial and indicate the continuous need for prevention of suicide among people with mental disorders.
PubMed ID
21969462 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute intermittent porphyria: comorbidity and shared familial risks with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277339
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;207(6):556-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Martin Cederlöf
Sarah E Bergen
Henrik Larsson
Mikael Landén
Paul Lichtenstein
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;207(6):556-7
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Family Health
Female
Humans
Male
Porphyria, Acute Intermittent - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) has been associated with schizophrenia in some studies, but prior research is limited by the absence of comparison populations. Here, we linked Swedish registers to examine the risk of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in 717 individuals diagnosed with AIP and their first-degree relatives, compared with matched individuals without AIP and their first-degree relatives. Individuals with AIP had a fourfold increased risk of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Similarly, relatives of individuals with AIP had double the risk of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, suggesting that these associations may be as a result of common genetic influences.
PubMed ID
26494868 View in PubMed
Less detail

Additive effects of childhood abuse and cannabis abuse on clinical expressions of bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261461
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jun;44(8):1653-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
M. Aas
B. Etain
F. Bellivier
C. Henry
T. Lagerberg
A. Ringen
I. Agartz
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jun;44(8):1653-62
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies of bipolar disorders indicate that childhood abuse and substance abuse are associated with the disorder. Whether both influence the clinical picture, or if one is mediating the association of the other, has not previously been investigated.
A total of 587 patients with bipolar disorders were recruited from Norway and France. A history of childhood abuse was obtained using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Diagnosis and clinical variables, including substance abuse, were based on structured clinical interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders or French version of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies).
Cannabis abuse was significantly associated with childhood abuse, specifically emotional and sexual abuse (? 2 = 8.63, p = 0.003 and ? 2 = 7.55, p = 0.006, respectively). Cannabis abuse was significantly associated with earlier onset of the illness (z = -4.17, p
PubMed ID
24028906 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult major affective disorder after prenatal exposure to an influenza epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208905
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Apr;54(4):322-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
R A Machón
S A Mednick
M O Huttunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, Calif., USA.
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Apr;54(4):322-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Brain - embryology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Embryonic and Fetal Development - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Abstract
We have previously reported an increase in schizophrenia diagnoses in a population exposed during the second trimester to the 1957 influenza epidemic. These basic findings together with a fair number of replications have been interpreted as supporting a neurodevelopmental contribution to the origins of schizophrenia. Recent neuroimaging findings suggest that affective illness may also have a neurodevelopmental origin. We examined the hypothesis that exposure to an influenza epidemic during the second trimester would increase the risk for adult major affective disorder.
The subjects had been exposed as fetuses to the type A2/Singapore influenza epidemic in greater Helsinki, Finland. Control subjects were born in the 6 years before the epidemic.
We found a significant (P .05) were similar. The second-trimester effect remained when we estimated population-based rates (2.1 vs 0.6 per 1000) (P .05) elevation was observed for the bipolar forms of major affective disorder.
These data are consistent with the hypothesis concerning the possible neurodevelopmental contribution to the origins of some forms of major affective disorder, especially unipolar depressive disorder. These encouraging findings, if replicated, may suggest that some mental disorders may stem, in part, from a disturbance in the development of the fetal brain during the second trimester.
PubMed ID
9107148 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancing paternal age and offspring violent offending: a sibling-comparison study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122731
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2012 Aug;24(3):739-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Yudi Pawitan
Brian M D'Onofrio
Niklas Långström
Paul Lichtenstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 281, Stockholm 171 77, Sweden. ralf.kuja-halkola@ki.se
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2012 Aug;24(3):739-53
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - genetics
Crime - psychology
Criminals - psychology
Fathers
Humans
Male
Paternal Age
Registries
Risk
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - genetics
Siblings - psychology
Sweden
Violence - psychology
Abstract
Children born to older fathers are at higher risk to develop severe psychopathology (e.g., schizophrenia and bipolar disorder), possibly because of increased de novo mutations during spermatogenesis with older paternal age. Because severe psychopathology is correlated with antisocial behavior, we examined possible associations between advancing paternal age and offspring violent offending. Interlinked Swedish national registers provided information on fathers' age at childbirth and violent criminal convictions in all offspring born from 1958 to 1979 (N = 2,359,921). We used ever committing a violent crime and number of violent crimes as indices of violent offending. The data included information on multiple levels; we compared differentially exposed siblings in within-family analyses to rigorously test causal influences. In the entire population, advancing paternal age predicted offspring violent crime according to both indices. Congruent with a causal effect, this association remained for rates of violent crime in within-family analyses. However, in within-family analyses, we found no association with ever committing a violent crime, suggesting that factors shared by siblings (genes and environment) confounded this association. Life-course persistent criminality has been proposed to have a partly biological etiology; our results agree with a stronger biological effect (i.e., de novo mutations) on persistent violent offending.
Notes
Cites: Am Psychol. 1989 Feb;44(2):329-352653143
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2003 Sep;60(9):929-3712963675
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1999 Mar;56(3):223-410078498
Cites: Mutat Res. 1999 Jul;437(1):5-910425386
Cites: Psychiatr Genet. 2005 Jun;15(2):117-2515900226
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2005 Jul;131(4):533-5416060801
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Sep;63(9):1026-3216953005
Cites: Science. 2007 Apr 20;316(5823):445-917363630
Cites: Psychol Med. 2007 Aug;37(8):1193-20217376258
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2007 Nov;33(6):1270-317712030
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2007 Nov;116(4):667-8318020715
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Jul;40(7):880-518511947
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Sep;65(9):1034-4018762589
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2008 Nov;34(6):1042-618796466
Cites: Crim Behav Ment Health. 2009;19(2):109-2419274628
Cites: JAMA. 2009 May 20;301(19):2016-2319454640
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2009 Aug;195(2):100-119648537
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2009 Aug;50(8):1018-2819281603
Cites: Nature. 2009 Aug 6;460(7256):748-5219571811
Cites: Trends Genet. 2009 Dec;25(12):528-3519883952
Cites: PLoS One. 2009;4(12):e845620041141
Cites: Psychol Med. 2010 Mar;40(3):477-8519627644
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2010 Jul;51(7):850-620214699
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2010 Sep;67(9):931-820819987
Cites: Psychol Med. 2011 Jan;41(1):97-10520334717
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;67(12):1325-621135334
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;168(1):82-820952457
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Apr;40(2):345-921450688
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2011 Jul;31(5):711-2621497585
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2011 Sep;37(5):1039-4720185538
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;16(10):996-100521826061
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2011 Dec;16(12):1203-1221116277
Cites: Behav Genet. 2012 Jan;42(1):3-1821761238
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Oct;57(10):979-8611015816
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2001 Apr;58(4):361-711296097
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2003 Mar;39(2):349-7112661890
Cites: Child Dev. 2003 Mar-Apr;74(2):465-7412705567
Cites: Stat Med. 2003 Aug 30;22(16):2591-60212898546
Cites: Psychol Rev. 1993 Oct;100(4):674-7018255953
PubMed ID
22781852 View in PubMed
Less detail

Affective disorders among Greenlandic psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46217
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Dec;100(6):424-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
I. Lynge
P. Munk-Jørgensen
P B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Basic Psychiatric Research, Department of Psychiatric Demography, Psychiatric Hospital in Arhus, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Dec;100(6):424-32
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Sex Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the treatment incidence, diagnostic stability and clinical and social outcome of affective disorders in the Greenlandic population. METHODS: A cohort of Greenlanders first hospitalized in 1980-1983 and diagnosed with an affective disorder at least once during the period 7 to 12 years after first admission formed the study population. The manic-depressive patients who were still alive at follow-up were invited for a Present State Examination, and information about clinical and social condition was obtained for the total cohort. RESULTS: The rates of manic-depressive psychoses diagnosed at first admission or later were 6.6 for men and 20.4 for women per 100,000 individuals of over 15 years of age. The unipolar:bipolar ratio was very low, namely 1:3 for men and 1:2 for women. Outcome was relatively poor. CONCLUSION: Manic-depression is a recognizable diagnostic category in Greenland. Extremely low rates of unipolar disorders in both sexes and high rates of bipolar disorders among women were the most marked findings.
PubMed ID
10626920 View in PubMed
Less detail

Affective disorders among patients with borderline personality disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118152
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e50930
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Hege Nordem Sjåstad
Rolf W Gråwe
Jens Egeland
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway. hege.nordem.sjastad@siv.no
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e50930
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outpatients - psychology
Prevalence
Abstract
The high co-occurrence between borderline personality disorder and affective disorders has led many to believe that borderline personality disorder should be considered as part of an affective spectrum. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the prevalence of affective disorders are higher for patients with borderline personality disorder than for patients with other personality disorders.
In a national cross-sectional study of patients receiving mental health treatment in Norway (N?=?36 773), we determined whether psychiatric outpatients with borderline personality disorder (N?=?1 043) had a higher prevalence of affective disorder in general, and whether they had an increased prevalence of depression, bipolar disorder or dysthymia specifically. They were compared to patients with paranoid, schizoid, dissocial, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, avoidant, dependent, or unspecified personality disorder, as well as an aggregated group of patients with personality disorders other than the borderline type (N?=?2 636). Odds ratios were computed for the borderline personality disorder group comparing it to the mixed sample of other personality disorders. Diagnostic assessments were conducted in routine clinical practice.
More subjects with borderline personality disorder suffered from unipolar than bipolar disorders. Nevertheless, borderline personality disorder had a lower rate of depression and dysthymia than several other personality disorder groups, whereas the rate of bipolar disorder tended to be higher. Odds ratios showed 34% lower risk for unipolar depression, 70% lower risk for dysthymia and 66% higher risk for bipolar disorder in patients with borderline personality disorder compared to the aggregated group of other personality disorders.
The results suggest that borderline personality disorder has a stronger association with affective disorders in the bipolar spectrum than disorders in the unipolar spectrum. This association may reflect an etiological relationship or diagnostic overlapping criteria.
Notes
Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2000 Summer;8(3):188-9510910415
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2012 May;169(5):476-8322737693
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2001 Jun;58(6):590-611386989
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 2001 Nov-Dec;35(6):307-1211684137
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2001 Dec;67(1-3):221-811869772
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2002 Jun;180:536-4212042233
Cites: Compr Psychiatry. 2003 Jan-Feb;44(1):28-3412524633
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2004 Aug;65(8):1049-5615323588
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2004 Nov;161(11):2108-1415514413
Cites: J Am Psychoanal Assoc. 1967 Jul;15(3):641-854861171
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1982 Jan;39(1):35-467055407
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1988 Apr;45(4):348-523355321
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1989 Aug;46(8):682-92751402
Cites: Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1991 May;42(5):481-72060913
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1991 Aug;148(8):967-751823531
Cites: Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1993 Feb;44(2):159-628432501
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 1994 Nov;103(4):610-247822562
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1995 Feb;152(2):239-477840358
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1995 Feb;152(2):268-707840363
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1995 Apr;152(4):571-87694906
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1996 Oct;153(10):1308-128831439
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1997 Jul;154(7):895-9039210738
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2004 Dec;110(6):401-715521823
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2004 Nov;113(4):499-50815535783
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2005 Jul;50(8):435-4116127960
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Oct;162(10):1911-816199838
Cites: Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Jan;30(1):68-7416019119
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jul;42(7):537-4617516013
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2007 Oct;68(10):1533-917960968
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2009 May;166(5):530-919411380
Cites: Eur Psychiatry. 2009 Oct;24(7):464-919793639
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Dec;44(12):1067-7419319457
Cites: J Pers Disord. 2010 Feb;24(1):3-1320205495
Cites: J Pers Disord. 2010 Feb;24(1):25-3720205497
Cites: J Pers Disord. 2010 Feb;24(1):60-8220205499
Cites: Psychiatr Q. 2011 Jun;82(2):95-11220882344
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;68(8):827-3721464343
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2012 May;169(5):445-622549200
Cites: Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;46(6):506-2122510555
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2000 Oct;102(4):256-6411089725
PubMed ID
23236411 View in PubMed
Less detail

Affective lability mediates the association between childhood trauma and suicide attempts, mixed episodes and co-morbid anxiety disorders in bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287299
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M. Aas
C. Henry
F. Bellivier
M. Lajnef
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
T V Lagerberg
S R Aminoff
T. Bjella
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
B. Etain
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Many studies have shown associations between a history of childhood trauma and more severe or complex clinical features of bipolar disorders (BD), including suicide attempts and earlier illness onset. However, the psychopathological mechanisms underlying these associations are still unknown. Here, we investigated whether affective lability mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and the severe clinical features of BD.
A total of 342 participants with BD were recruited from France and Norway. Diagnosis and clinical characteristics were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) or the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Affective lability was measured using the short form of the Affective Lability Scale (ALS-SF). A history of childhood trauma was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Mediation analyses were performed using the SPSS process macro.
Using the mediation model and covariation for the lifetime number of major mood episodes, affective lability was found to statistically mediate the relationship between childhood trauma experiences and several clinical variables, including suicide attempts, mixed episodes and anxiety disorders. No significant mediation effects were found for rapid cycling or age at onset.
Our data suggest that affective lability may represent a psychological dimension that mediates the association between childhood traumatic experiences and the risk of a more severe or complex clinical expression of BD.
PubMed ID
27894372 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age at fatherhood: heritability and associations with psychiatric disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287358
Source
Psychol Med. 2016 Oct;46(14):2981-2988
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
E M Frans
P. Lichtenstein
C M Hultman
R. Kuja-Halkola
Source
Psychol Med. 2016 Oct;46(14):2981-2988
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autism Spectrum Disorder - epidemiology - genetics
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Paternal Age
Registries
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Advancing paternal age has been linked to psychiatric disorders. These associations might be caused by the increased number of de novo mutations transmitted to offspring of older men. It has also been suggested that the associations are confounded by a genetic liability for psychiatric disorders in parents. The aim of this study was to indirectly test the confounding hypotheses by examining if there is a genetic component to advancing paternal age and if men with a genetic liability for psychiatric disorders have children at older ages.
We examined the genetic component to advancing paternal age by utilizing the twin model in a cohort of male twins (N = 14 679). We also studied ages at childbirth in men with or without schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and/or autism spectrum disorder. Ages were examined in: (1) healthy men, (2) affected men, (3) healthy men with an affected sibling, (4) men with healthy spouses, (5) men with affected spouses, and (6) men with healthy spouses with an affected sibling.
The twin analyses showed that late fatherhood is under genetic influence (heritability = 0.33). However, affected men or men with affected spouses did not have children at older ages. The same was found for healthy individuals with affected siblings. Instead, these men were generally having children at younger ages.
Although there is a genetic component influencing late fatherhood, our data suggest that the associations are not explained by psychiatric disorders or a genetic liability for psychiatric disorders in the parent.
PubMed ID
27516123 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age at onset of first episode and time to treatment in in-patients with bipolar disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88898
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2009 Jun;194(6):559-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Morken Gunnar
Vaaler Arne E
Folden Gunn E
Andreassen Ole A
Malt Ulrik F
Author Affiliation
Østmarka Psychiatric Department, St Olavs Hospital, Box 3008 Lade, Trondheim 7441, Norway. gunnar.morken@ntnu.no
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2009 Jun;194(6):559-60
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the relationship between age at onset and time to first pharmacological treatment in patients with either bipolar I or II disorder. A total of 146 consecutive in-patients acutely admitted from the same catchment area were included. Patients were divided into four age groups: 0-12 years (23%); 13-18 years (32%); 19-29 years (26%); and > or =30 years (18%). Mean age at first affective episode was 20.2 years (s.d.=11.8). This represents a similar pattern to the age at onset seen in out-patients in the USA. Early age at onset predicted a longer time to first pharmacological treatment (rho =-0.695, P
PubMed ID
19478300 View in PubMed
Less detail

175 records – page 1 of 18.