Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

11 records – page 1 of 2.

Angiotensin II receptor blockers for the treatment of heart failure: a class effect?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164481
Source
Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Apr;27(4):526-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Marie Hudson
Karin Humphries
Jack V Tu
Hassan Behlouli
Richard Sheppard
Louise Pilote
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec. marie.hudson@mcgill.ca
Source
Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Apr;27(4):526-34
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Benzimidazoles - therapeutic use
Benzoates - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds - therapeutic use
British Columbia
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Heart Failure - drug therapy - mortality
Hospital Information Systems - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Losartan - therapeutic use
Male
Ontario
Proportional Hazards Models
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Valine - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Abstract
To examine the class effect of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) on mortality in patients with heart failure who were aged 65 years or older.
Retrospective population-based study.
Administrative database that stores information on hospital discharge summaries for the Canadian provinces of Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia.
A total of 6876 patients aged 65 years or older who were discharged with a primary diagnosis of heart failure between January 1, 1998, and March 31, 2003, and who filled at least one prescription for an ARB within 90 days of discharge.
Times to all-cause death in patients receiving individual ARBs were compared. Models were adjusted for demographic, clinical, physician, and hospital characteristics; models were also adjusted for dosage categories, which were represented by time-dependent variables. The cohort of 6876 patients had a mean +/- SD age of 78 +/- 7 years, and most (62%) were women. Losartan was the most frequently prescribed ARB (61%), followed by irbesartan (14%), valsartan (13%), candesartan (10%), and telmisartan (2%). Irbesartan, valsartan, and candesartan were associated with better survival rates than losartan (adjusted hazard ratios [HRs] and 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 0.65 [0.53-0.79], 0.63 [0.51-0.79], and 0.71 [0.57-0.90], respectively). No difference was noted in mortality in patients prescribed telmisartan compared with those receiving losartan (HR 0.92 [95% CI 0.55-1.54]).
Elderly patients with heart failure who were prescribed losartan had worse survival rates compared with those prescribed other commonly used ARBs. The absence of a class effect for ARBs is consistent with data showing pharmacologic differences among the drugs.
PubMed ID
17381379 View in PubMed
Less detail

B2 bradykinin receptor (B2BKR) polymorphism and change in left ventricular mass in response to antihypertensive treatment: results from the Swedish Irbesartan Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Investigation versus Atenolol (SILVHIA) trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9778
Source
J Hypertens. 2003 Mar;21(3):621-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Pär Hallberg
Lars Lind
Karl Michaëlsson
Julia Karlsson
Lisa Kurland
Thomas Kahan
Karin Malmqvist
K Peter Ohman
Fredrik Nyström
Håkan Melhus
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Research Department 2, Uppsala University Hospital, 75185 Uppsala, Sweden. par.hallberg@medsci.uu.se
Source
J Hypertens. 2003 Mar;21(3):621-4
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atenolol - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Female
Genotype
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - genetics - pathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - drug therapy - genetics - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Organ Size - drug effects
Polymorphism, Genetic
Receptor, Bradykinin B2 - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Hypertension is associated with a number of adverse morphologic and functional changes in the cardiovascular system, including left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Studies have demonstrated that bradykinin, through the B2 bradykinin receptor (B2BKR), mediates important cardiovascular effects that may protect against LV hypertrophy. Recently, a +9/-9 exon 1 polymorphism of the B2BKR was shown to be strongly associated with LV growth response among normotensive males undergoing physical training. We aimed to clarify whether the processes found in exercise-induced LV growth in normotensive people also occur in pathological LV hypertrophy. DESIGN AND METHODS: We determined the B2BKR genotype of 90 patients with essential hypertension and echocardiographically diagnosed LV hypertrophy, included in a double-blind study to receive treatment for 48 weeks with either the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist irbesartan or the beta1-adrenoceptor antagonist atenolol. RESULTS: B2BKR +9/+9 genotypes responded poorly in LV mass regression, independent of blood pressure reduction or treatment, as compared to the other genotypes (adjusted mean change in LV mass index = -10.0 +/- 4.6 versus -21.6 +/- 2.2 g/m2, P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest an impact of the B2BKR polymorphism on LV mass regression during antihypertensive treatment.
PubMed ID
12640257 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effects of antihypertensive treatment on the doppler-derived myocardial performance index in patients with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy: results from the Swedish irbesartan in left ventricular hypertrophy investigation versus atenolol (SILVHIA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99002
Source
Echocardiography. 2009 Aug;26(7):753-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Stefan Liljedahl
Thomas Kahan
Lars Lind
Johan Arnlöv
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Echocardiography. 2009 Aug;26(7):753-8
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atenolol - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Echocardiography, Doppler - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - drug therapy - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Perfusion Imaging - methods
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of antihypertensive treatment on the Doppler-derived myocardial performance index (MPI) in patients with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy. METHODS: The MPI was measured at baseline and after 48 weeks of antihypertensive treatment in 93 participants of the SILVHIA trial, where individuals with primary hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy were randomized to double blind treatment with either irbesartan or atenolol. RESULTS: Antihypertensive treatment lowered MPI (mean difference -0.03 +/- 0.01, P = 0.04). Changes in MPI by treatment were associated with changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (beta-coefficient -0.35 P = 0.005), stroke volume/pulse pressure (reflecting arterial compliance, beta-coefficient -0.39 P
PubMed ID
19486119 View in PubMed
Less detail

International geographic variation in event rates in trials of heart failure with preserved and reduced ejection fraction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261225
Source
Circulation. 2015 Jan 6;131(1):43-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-6-2015
Author
Søren L Kristensen
Lars Køber
Pardeep S Jhund
Scott D Solomon
John Kjekshus
Robert S McKelvie
Michael R Zile
Christopher B Granger
John Wikstrand
Michel Komajda
Peter E Carson
Marc A Pfeffer
Karl Swedberg
Hans Wedel
Salim Yusuf
John J V McMurray
Source
Circulation. 2015 Jan 6;131(1):43-53
Date
Jan-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Benzimidazoles - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Fluorobenzenes - therapeutic use
Geography
Heart Failure - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Pyrimidines - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Stroke Volume - physiology
Sulfonamides - therapeutic use
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
International geographic differences in outcomes may exist for clinical trials of heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF), but there are few data for those with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF).
We analyzed outcomes by international geographic region in the Irbesartan in Heart Failure with Preserved systolic function trial (I-Preserve), the Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM)-Preserved trial, the CHARM-Alternative and CHARM-Added HF-REF trials, and the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in HF-REF (CORONA). Crude rates of heart failure hospitalization varied by geographic region, and more so for HF-PEF than for HF-REF. Rates in patients with HF-PEF were highest in the United States/Canada (HF hospitalization rate 7.6 per 100 patient-years in I-Preserve; 8.8 in CHARM-Preserved), intermediate in Western Europe (4.8/100 and 4.7/100), and lowest in Eastern Europe/Russia (3.3/100 and 2.8/100). The difference between the United States/Canada versus Eastern Europe/Russia persisted after adjustment for key prognostic variables: adjusted hazard ratios 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.74; P=0.04) in I-Preserve and 1.85 (95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.91; P=0.01) in CHARM-Preserved. In HF-REF, rates of HF hospitalization were slightly lower in Western Europe compared with other regions. For both HF-REF and HF-PEF, there were few regional differences in rates of all-cause or cardiovascular mortality.
The differences in event rates observed suggest there is international geographic variation in 1 or more of the definition and diagnosis of HF-PEF, the risk profile of patients enrolled, and the threshold for hospitalization, which has implications for the conduct of future global trials.
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2015 Jan 6;131(1):7-1025406307
PubMed ID
25406306 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term effects of losartan on blood pressure and left ventricular structure in essential hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210675
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 1996 Nov;10(11):729-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
A. Himmelmann
A. Svensson
A. Bergbrant
L. Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Ostra University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 1996 Nov;10(11):729-34
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Double-Blind Method
Female
Heart Ventricles - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Imidazoles - therapeutic use
Losartan
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
Abstract
In a 12-week, randomized, double-blind study, 24 patients with essential hypertension were given the angiotensin II antagonist losartan, or the beta-adrenoceptor blocker atenolol. Both drugs reduced blood pressure (BP) well, but losartan tended to reduce left ventricular mass (LVM) in contrast to atenolol. Following the double-blind phase 19 patients entered an open treatment period with losartan and additional treatment if BP was uncontrolled. LV structures were measured by echocardiography. The mean follow-up period was 29 +/- 2.6 (range 26-32) months. BP was reduced from 155.6 +/- 15.6/103.4 +/- 5.2 mm Hg to 131.3 +/- 10.5/82.7 +/- 3.3 mm Hg (P
Notes
Comment In: J Hum Hypertens. 1998 Aug;12(8):493-59759981
PubMed ID
9004102 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Losartan and the LIFE-study. Antihypertensive treatment with AT1-receptor antagonist].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212658
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 10;116(4):504-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1996
Author
S E Kjeldsen
P. Omvik
Author Affiliation
Hjertemedisinsk avdeling, Medisinsk klinikk, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 10;116(4):504-7
Date
Feb-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin I - antagonists & inhibitors
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds - therapeutic use
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Imidazoles - therapeutic use
Losartan
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Scandinavia
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
United States
Abstract
The renin-angiotensin system, through the effects of angiotensin II, may be involved in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension and associated left ventricular hypertrophy. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) lowers blood pressure and reduces left ventricular hypertrophy. ACEI, however, may not completely inhibit the production of angiotensin II and its effects, and adverse effects like cough and rise in creatinine have been associated with ACEI and reduced degradation of bradykinin. The first selective antagonist of the angiotensin II-1 (AT1) receptor, losartan, has recently been approved. The LIFE study has been started, in which 8,300 hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy in Scandinavia and the USA will be randomized to blinded treatment with either atenolol or losartan to compare the effects on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality over a period of five years.
PubMed ID
8644056 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nurse-recorded and ambulatory blood pressure predicts treatment-induced reduction of left ventricular hypertrophy equally well in hypertension: results from the Swedish irbesartan left ventricular hypertrophy investigation versus atenolol (SILVHIA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9925
Source
J Hypertens. 2002 Aug;20(8):1527-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Fredrik Nyström
Karin Malmqvist
K Peter Ohman
Thomas Kahan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden. Fredrik.Nystrom@lio.se
Source
J Hypertens. 2002 Aug;20(8):1527-33
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atenolol - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Blood Pressure Determination - nursing
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Echocardiography
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - drug therapy - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
Abstract
OBJECTIVE : To compare the relationships of treatment-induced reductions of left ventricular hypertrophy to the changes in clinic and ambulatory blood pressure (BP). DESIGN : Double-blind and randomized treatment with irbesartan or atenolol for 48 weeks. PATIENTS : Patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy (n = 66) with a seated diastolic BP 90-115 mmHg (average of three measurements one minute apart by nurses). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES : Registrations of echocardiographic left ventricular (LV) mass. Clinic and ambulatory BP. RESULTS : In the total material, nurse-measured BP was reduced by 23 +/- 15/16 +/- 7.7 mmHg and 24-h ambulatory BP fell 20 +/- 15/14 +/- 8.5 mmHg by treatment. The correlation between the change in nurse-measured BP and LV mass index (LVMI) induced by treatment was r = 0.35, P = 0.004 for systolic BP and r = 0.26, P = 0.03 for diastolic BP. Corresponding values for 24-h ambulatory BP were r = 0.29, P = 0.02 and r = 0.35, P = 0.004, respectively, with similar correlations for day- and night-time ambulatory BP. The nurse-recorded BP was slightly higher than ambulatory BP (systolic clinic - systolic 24-h ambulatory BP = 5 mmHg). Using 130/80 mmHg as a cut-off value for normal 24-h ambulatory BP, eight subjects had normal diastolic or systolic ambulatory BP, or both. Interestingly, these patients also experienced LVMI regression following treatment (low/normal ABP, -13 +/- 21 g/m2; remaining patients, -18 +/- 22 g/m2, P > 0.5). CONCLUSIONS : In patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy, ambulatory BP is not superior to carefully standardized nurse-recorded seated BP in terms of associations with treatment-induced changes in LV mass.
PubMed ID
12172314 View in PubMed
Less detail

Polymorphisms in the angiotensinogen and angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene are related to change in left ventricular mass during antihypertensive treatment: results from the Swedish Irbesartan Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Investigation versus Atenolol (SILVHIA) trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10016
Source
J Hypertens. 2002 Apr;20(4):657-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Kurland L
Melhus H
Karlsson J
Kahan T
Malmqvist K
Ohman P
Nyström F
Hägg A
Lind L
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. lisa.kurland@medsci.uu.se
Source
J Hypertens. 2002 Apr;20(4):657-63
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alleles
Angiotensinogen - genetics
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atenolol - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - genetics - pathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - drug therapy - genetics - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1
Receptors, Angiotensin - antagonists & inhibitors - genetics
Renin-Angiotensin System - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to determine if gene polymorphisms in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) were related to the degree of change in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) during antihypertensive treatment. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with essential hypertension and echocardiographically diagnosed LVH were included in a double-blind study to receive treatment with either the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-receptor) antagonist irbesartan (n = 41), or the beta-1 adrenergic receptor blocker atenolol (n = 43) as monotherapy for 3 months. The angiotensinogen T174M and M235T, the angiotensin-converting enzyme I/D, the AT1-receptor A1166C and the aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) -344 C/T polymorphisms were analysed and related to the change in left ventricular mass (LVM). Patients with the angiotensinogen 174 TM genotype treated with irbesartan responded with the greatest reduction in LVM (-23 +/- 31SD g/m2 for TM and +0.5 +/- 18 g/m2 for TT, P = 0.005), independent of blood pressure reduction. Both the angiotensinogen 235 T-allele (P = 0.02) and the AT1-receptor 1166 AC genotype responded with the greatest reduction in LVM when treated with irbesartan (-0.1 +/- 19 g/m2 for AA and -18 +/- 30 g/m2 for AC, P = 0.02), independent of blood pressure reduction. These polymorphisms were not associated with the change in LVM during treatment with atenolol. DISCUSSION: The angiotensinogen T174M and M235T and the AT1-receptor A1166C polymorphisms were related to the change in LVH during antihypertensive treatment with an AT1-receptor antagonist; of these angiotensinogen T174M was the most powerful. This highlights the role of the RAAS for left ventricular hypertrophy and the potential of pharmacogenetics as a tool for guidance of antihypertensive therapy.
Notes
Comment In: J Hypertens. 2002 Apr;20(4):583-511910285
PubMed ID
11910301 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tissue velocity echocardiography shows early improvement in diastolic function with irbesartan and atenolol therapy in patients with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy. Results form the Swedish Irbesartan Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Investigation vs Atenolol (SILVHIA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80841
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2006 Sep;19(9):927-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Müller-Brunotte Richard
Kahan Thomas
Malmqvist Karin
Ring Margareta
Edner Magnus
Author Affiliation
Division of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. richard.muller-brunotte@ds.se
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2006 Sep;19(9):927-36
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atenolol - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds - therapeutic use
Blood Flow Velocity - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diastole - drug effects
Double-Blind Method
Echocardiography, Doppler
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - etiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Abnormal diastolic function is common in hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Early identification and treatment may prevent future cardiovascular events. METHODS: We examined 58 hypertensive patients with LVH, 38 with hypertension but no LVH, and 38 normotensive subjects. The effects of the AT1 receptor blocker irbesartan and the beta1 blocker atenolol on diastolic function during 48 weeks of treatment were evaluated in the LVH group by tissue velocity echocardiography (TVE). We measured basal septal and lateral wall velocities of early (Em) and late (Am) diastolic myocardial wall motion, Em velocity deceleration time (E-decm), and isovolumic relaxation time (IVRTm). For comparison, diastolic function was assessed by conventional mitral pulse wave Doppler echocardiography. RESULTS: Diastolic function was impaired in both hypertensive groups. Irbesartan and atenolol (week 48, septal wall) improved IVRTm (-44%, P
Notes
Comment In: Am J Hypertens. 2006 Sep;19(9):937-816942936
PubMed ID
16942935 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.