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81 records – page 1 of 9.

Source
Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):794-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-2005
Source
Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):794-5
Date
Oct-6-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Biomedical Research - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Evolution, Molecular
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history - prevention & control - virology
Orthomyxoviridae - genetics - pathogenicity
Publishing
Time Factors
Virulence - genetics
Virulence Factors
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2006 Jan 19;439(7074):26616421546
Comment On: Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):889-9316208372
Erratum In: Nature. 2005 Oct 13;437(7061):940
PubMed ID
16208326 View in PubMed
Less detail

[About measures for ensuring the biological safety on territory of Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154255
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2008 Sep-Oct;(5):54-7
Publication Type
Article

Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165658
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Bruce Prince
David M Andrus
Kevin Gwinner
Author Affiliation
College of Business Administration, Kansas State University, Calvin 101, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. jbprince@ksu.edu
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Canada
Career Choice
Consumer Product Safety
Delphi Technique
Education, Veterinary - manpower - trends
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Schools, Veterinary - manpower - trends
United States
Veterinary Medicine - manpower - trends
Abstract
The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism.
PubMed ID
17220489 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Anthrax and disaster planning at the university hospital in Ulleval].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189525
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Mar 20;122(8):852; author reply 852
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2002
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Dec 12;98(50):5742-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-2001
Author
A. Tegnell
M. Hellers
R. Wollin
U. Eriksson
M. Forsman
L. Engstrand
F. Elgh
Author Affiliation
Bakteriologiska avdelningen, Smittskyddsinstitutet, Solna.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Dec 12;98(50):5742-5
Date
Dec-12-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthrax - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - supply & distribution
Bacillus anthracis - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Biological Warfare - history - prevention & control
Bioterrorism
Communicable Disease Control - methods - standards
Disaster Planning - methods - standards
History, 20th Century
Humans
Sweden
United States
Abstract
The recent occurrence in the USA of deliberate release of virulent Bacillus anthracis in letters sent to three media corporations and to the American senate has led to a great anxiety in Sweden and elsewhere in Europe. Numerous letters have been suspected to contain B. anthracis spores and several have contained powder of different types. In none of the tested letters collected by the Swedish police have we been able to detect anthrax bacilli. Powder containing letters have been tested with either bacterial isolation and/or B. anthracis specific PCR. Anthrax is a disease found naturally in herbivores and is occasionally spread to humans. It is caused by the gram-positive rod B. anthracis that was discovered by Robert Koch in 1876. Beginning in the 1930s many states have developed B. anthracis for use as a weapon. A few releases of the bacteria have been reported before October 2001. B. anthracis causes three forms of disease, cutaneous, pulmonary and gastro-intestinal. The pulmonary form is the most dangerous and may lead to death merely one to two days after onset of severe symptoms. This is due to the rapid growth and release of several potent toxins that engage the immune system and promote tissue destruction. B. anthracis infection can be treated with several antibiotics, among which quinolones and tetracyclins have been recommended. Diagnosis can readily be achieved by microscopy, bacterial isolation and PCR at the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and the Swedish Defence Research Agency. Antibiotics relevant for treatment of B. anthracis infections are already stockpilled in our country. Further actions to strengthen our capability to deal with bioterrorism are ongoing.
PubMed ID
11789095 View in PubMed
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Anthrax: walking the fine line between precaution and panic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192166
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Nov 27;165(11):1528
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-2001
Author
E. Weir
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Nov 27;165(11):1528
Date
Nov-27-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthrax - epidemiology - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Bioterrorism - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Correspondence as Topic
Fear
Humans
Public Health Practice
Safety Management - methods
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Sep 5;163(5):60811006776
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Mar 10;158(5):633-49526481
Cites: Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1991 Feb 9;17(6):31-31903088
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2001 Oct 19;50(41):889-9311686472
PubMed ID
11762587 View in PubMed
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A Bayesian approach for estimating bioterror attacks from patient data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139930
Source
Stat Med. 2011 Jan 30;30(2):101-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2011
Author
J. Ray
Y M Marzouk
H N Najm
Author Affiliation
Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969, Livermore, CA 94550-0969, USA. jairay@somnet.sandia.gov
Source
Stat Med. 2011 Jan 30;30(2):101-26
Date
Jan-30-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthrax - diagnosis - epidemiology
Bacillus anthracis
Bayes Theorem
Bias (epidemiology)
Bioterrorism
Disease Outbreaks
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Models, Statistical
Patients - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Terrorist attacks using an aerosolized pathogen have gained credibility as a national security concern after the anthrax attacks of 2001. Inferring some important details of the attack quickly, for example, the number of people infected, the time of infection, and a representative dose received can be crucial to planning a medical response. We use a Bayesian approach, based on a short time series of diagnosed patients, to estimate a joint probability density for these parameters. We first test the formulation with idealized cases and then apply it to realistic scenarios, including the Sverdlovsk anthrax outbreak of 1979. We also use simulated outbreaks to explore the impact of model error, as when the model used for generating simulated epidemic curves does not match the model subsequently used to characterize the attack. We find that in all cases except for the smallest attacks (fewer than 100 infected people), 3-5 days of data are sufficient to characterize the outbreak to a specificity that is useful for directing an emergency response.
PubMed ID
20963771 View in PubMed
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[Biological weapons and biological defence in Denmark].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172902
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Sep 5;167(36):3381-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-5-2005
Author
Erik Deichmann Heegaard
John-Erik Stig Hansen
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Center for Biologisk Beredskab, København S. erh@ssi.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Sep 5;167(36):3381-4
Date
Sep-5-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Warfare - prevention & control
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Chemical Warfare - prevention & control
Denmark
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
European Union
Humans
Abstract
Biological weapons have been known for centuries, and since World War II, offensive programs have accelerated the development of these weapons considerably. The anthrax attacks in the fall 2001 and speculations regarding the research and development of Iraqi bioweapons have been causes for concern. The effect of biological weapons may be overwhelming, in particular when one is dealing with a contagious agent. The National Centre for Biological Defence provides a preparedness capability through evidence-based research and practical operational capabilities.
PubMed ID
16159486 View in PubMed
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81 records – page 1 of 9.