Skip header and navigation

Refine By

67 records – page 1 of 7.

[Accumulation of radionuclides in food chains of the Yenisei River after the nuclear power plant shutdown at the mining-and-chemical enterprise].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261756
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Jul-Aug;54(4):405-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
T A Zotina
E A Trofimova
A D Karpov
A Ia Bolsunovskii
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Jul-Aug;54(4):405-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biota
Chemical Industry
Fishes - metabolism
Food chain
Industrial Waste - analysis
Mining
Muscle, Skeletal - radionuclide imaging
Nuclear Power Plants
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Rivers - chemistry
Seasons
Siberia
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Accumulation of artificial and natural radionuclides in the chains of food webs leading to non-predatory and piscivorous fish of the Yenisei River was investigated during one year before and three years after the shutdown of a nuclear power plant at the Mining-and-Chemical Combine (2009-2012). The activity of artificial radionuclides in the samples of biota ofthe Yenisei River (aquatic moss, gammarids, dace, grayling, pike) was estimated. The concentration of radionuclides with induced activity (51Cr, 54Mn, 58Co, 60Co, 65Zn, 141, 144Ce, 152, 154Eu, 239Np) decreased in the biomass of biota after the shutdown of the nuclear power plant; the concentration of 137Cs did not. Analysis of the accumulation factors (C(F)) allows us to expect the effective accumulation of 137Cs in the terminal level of the food web of the Yenisei River--pike (C(F) = 2.0-9.4), i.e. biomagnifications of radiocesium. Accumulation of artificial, radionuclides in non-predatory fish from gammarids was not effective (C(F)
PubMed ID
25775829 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alder, Nitrogen, and Lake Ecology: Terrestrial-Aquatic Linkages in the Postglacial History of Lone Spruce Pond, Southwestern Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284914
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0169106
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Bianca B Perren
Yarrow Axford
Darrell S Kaufman
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0169106
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Alnus - growth & development - metabolism
Animals
Biota
Climate
Climate change
Diatoms - physiology
Ecosystem
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Lakes - chemistry
Nitrogen - metabolism
Picea - growth & development - metabolism
Ponds - chemistry
Soil
Abstract
Diatoms, combined with a multiproxy study of lake sediments (organic matter, N, d15N, d13C, biogenic silica, grain size, Cladocera and chironomids, Alnus pollen) from Lone Spruce Pond, Alaska detail the late-glacial to Holocene history of the lake and its response to regional climate and landscape change over the last 14.5 cal ka BP. We show that the immigration of alder (Alnus viridis) in the early Holocene marks the rise of available reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the lake as well as the establishment of a primarily planktonic diatom community. The later establishment of diatom Discostella stelligera is coupled to a rise of sedimentary d15N, indicating diminished competition for this nutrient. This terrestrial-aquatic linkage demonstrates how profoundly vegetation may affect soil geochemistry, lake development, and lake ecology over millennial timescales. Furthermore, the response of the diatom community to strengthened stratification and N levels in the past confirms the sensitivity of planktonic diatom communities to changing thermal and nutrient regimes. These past ecosystem dynamics serve as an analogue for the nature of threshold-type ecological responses to current climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (Nr) deposition, but also for the larger changes we should anticipate under future climate, pollution, and vegetation succession scenarios in high-latitude and high-elevation regions.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2009 Jun 5;324(5932):128819498161
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2009 Feb 7;276(1656):427-3518812287
Cites: Science. 1990 Dec 7;250(4986):1383-517754982
Cites: Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2015 May;90(2):522-4124917134
Cites: Science. 2008 May 16;320(5878):889-9218487183
Cites: Ecology. 2012 Oct;93(10):2155-6423185877
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Mar 22;102(12):4397-40215738395
Cites: Nature. 2000 Nov 9;408(6809):161-611089963
Cites: Ecol Appl. 2010 Jan;20(1):30-5920349829
Cites: Science. 2011 Dec 16;334(6062):1545-822174250
PubMed ID
28076393 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic use during pregnancy alters the commensal vaginal microbiota.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261455
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2014 Jul;20(7):629-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
J. Stokholm
S. Schjørring
C E Eskildsen
L. Pedersen
A L Bischoff
N. Følsgaard
C G Carson
B L K Chawes
K. Bønnelykke
A. Mølgaard
B. Jacobsson
K A Krogfelt
H. Bisgaard
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2014 Jul;20(7):629-35
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Biota - drug effects
Denmark
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy
Vagina - microbiology
Abstract
Antibiotics may induce alterations in the commensal microbiota of the birth canal in pregnant women. Therefore, we studied the effect of antibiotic administration during pregnancy on commensal vaginal bacterial colonization at gestational week 36. Six hundred and sixty-eight pregnant women from the novel unselected Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2010 ) pregnancy cohort participated in this analysis. Detailed information on oral antibiotic prescriptions during pregnancy filled at the pharmacy was obtained and verified prospectively. Vaginal samples were obtained at pregnancy week 36 and cultured for bacteria. Women who received oral antibiotics during any pregnancy trimester had an increased rate of colonization by Staphylococcus species in the vaginal samples as compared with samples obtained from women without any antibiotic treatment during pregnancy (adjusted OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.06-2.52, p 0.028). Oral antibiotic administration in the third trimester were also associated with increased colonization by Staphylococcus species (adjusted OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.04-3.76, p 0.037). These bacteriological changes were associated with urinary tract infection antibiotics. Women treated in the third trimester of pregnancy were more often colonized by Escherichia coli than women without antibiotic treatment in the third trimester (adjusted OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.04-3.52, p 0.038). This change was associated with respiratory tract infection (RTI) antibiotics. We did not observe any significant changes in vaginal Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptoccocus) or Staphylococcus aureus colonization following antibiotic treatment in pregnancy. Antibiotic administration during pregnancy leads to alterations in the vaginal microbiological ecology prior to birth, with potential morbidity, and long-term effects on the early microbial colonization of the neonate.
PubMed ID
24118384 View in PubMed
Less detail

Approaches to estimating the transfer of radionuclides to Arctic biota

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102080
Source
Radioprotection. 2005 Jun;40(Suppl.1):S285-S290
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
  1 website  
Author
Beresford, NA
Wright, SM
Barnett, CL
Golikov, V.
Shutov, V
Kravtsova, O
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, UK
Institute for Radiation Hygiene, St. Petersburg, Russia
Source
Radioprotection. 2005 Jun;40(Suppl.1):S285-S290
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic
Biota
Ecosystems
Radionuclides
Radioprotection
Soil
Transfer values
Abstract
We review collated data and available models for estimating the transfer of radionuclides to terrestrial biota within the European Arctic. The most abundant data are for radiocaesium and radiostrontium although many data for natural radionuclides are available. For some radionuclides no data are available for describing transfer to Arctic biota. Allometric-kinetic models have been used to estimate transfer for radionuclide-biota combinations. Predicted values were in good agreement with observed data for some radionuclides although less so for others. There are no bespoke models to enable the dynamic prediction of radionuclide transfer to Arctic biota. A human Arctic foodchain model has been adapted to estimate 137Cs and 90Sr transfer to some Arctic biota. There are many factors of Arctic ecosystems which may influence radionuclide behaviour including short growing seasons, prolonged soil freezing, and effects of low temperatures on biological rates. If exposure to ionising radiation in Arctic ecosystems is to be robustly predicted such factors must be fully understood and incorporated into models.
Online Resources
Less detail

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community divergence within a common host plant in two different soils in a subarctic Aeolian sand area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263039
Source
Mycorrhiza. 2014 Oct;24(7):539-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Gaia Francini
Minna Männistö
Vilhelmiina Alaoja
Minna-Maarit Kytöviita
Source
Mycorrhiza. 2014 Oct;24(7):539-50
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biota
Cluster analysis
DNA, Fungal - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Plant - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Lipids - analysis
Molecular Sequence Data
Mycelium - chemistry
Mycorrhizae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Phylogeny
Plant Roots - microbiology
Poaceae - microbiology
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
There is rising awareness that different arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have different autoecology and occupy different soil niches and that the benefits they provide to the host plant are dependent on plant-AM fungus combination. However, the role and community composition of AM fungi in succession are not well known and the northern latitudes remain poorly investigated ecosystems. We studied AM fungal communities in the roots of the grass Deschampsia flexuosa in two different, closely located, successional stages in a northern Aeolian sand area. The AM fungal taxa richness in planta was estimated by cloning and sequencing small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. AM colonization, shoot d (13)C signature, and %N and %C were measured. Soil microbial community structure and AM fungal mycelium abundance were estimated using phospholipid (PLFA) and neutral lipid (NLFA) analyses. The two successional stages were characterized by distinct plant, microbial, and fungal communities. AM fungal species richness was very low in both the early and late successional stages. AM frequency in D. flexuosa roots was higher in the early successional stage than in the late one. The AM fungal taxa retrieved belonged to the genera generally adapted to Arctic or extreme environments. AM fungi seemed to be important in the early stage of the succession, suggesting that AM fungi may help plants to better cope with the harsh environmental conditions, especially in an early successional stage with more extreme environmental fluctuations.
PubMed ID
24687606 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Office of Naval Research, Naval Research Laboratory, Hunter College
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1999
Author
Crane, K
Galasso, JL
Author Affiliation
Office of Naval Research, Naval Research Laboratory, Hunter College
Source
Office of Naval Research, Naval Research Laboratory, Hunter College
Date
1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Acidification
Arctic haze
Atmospheric transport
Biota
Cesium-137
Climate change
Heavy metals
Marine-life contamination pathways
Oceanic transport
Ozone depletion
Plutonium-239
Plutonium-240
Radionuclides
Riverine transport
Strontium-90
Terrestrial-life contamination pathways
Transport pathways
Abstract
This atlas of environmental information is intended to display graphically and make available to a wide audience the data and references to data compiled as a result of the Arctic Nuclear Waste Assessment Program (ANWAP).
Notes
Available at UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: Oversize TD196.R3 C7 1999
Less detail

Bacterial communities in ancient permafrost profiles of Svalbard, Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289236
Source
J Basic Microbiol. 2017 Dec; 57(12):1018-1036
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Purnima Singh
Shiv M Singh
Ram N Singh
Simantini Naik
Utpal Roy
Alok Srivastava
Manfred Bölter
Author Affiliation
Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), Pilani-K.K. Birla Goa Campus, Zuarinagar, Goa, India.
Source
J Basic Microbiol. 2017 Dec; 57(12):1018-1036
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - classification - genetics
Bacterial Load
Biota
Cluster analysis
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Permafrost - microbiology
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Svalbard
Abstract
Permafrost soils are unique habitats in polar environment and are of great ecological relevance. The present study focuses on the characterization of bacterial communities from permafrost profiles of Svalbard, Arctic. Counts of culturable bacteria range from 1.50?×?103 to 2.22?×?105 CFU?g-1 , total bacterial numbers range from 1.14?×?105 to 5.52?×?105 cells?g-1 soil. Bacterial isolates are identified through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas are the most dominant genera, and A. sulfonivorans, A. bergeri, P. mandelii, and P. jessenii as the dominant species. Other species belong to genera Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Enterobacter, Nesterenkonia, Psychrobacter, Rhizobium, Rhodococcus, Sphingobacterium, Sphingopyxis, Stenotrophomonas, and Virgibacillus. To the best of our knowledge, genera Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Nesterenkonia, Psychrobacter, Rhizobium, Sphingobacterium, Sphingopyxis, Stenotrophomonas, and Virgibacillus are the first northernmost records from Arctic permafrost. The present study fills the knowledge gap of culturable bacterial communities and their chronological characterization from permafrost soils of Ny-Ålesund (79°N), Arctic.
PubMed ID
28940222 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bacterial community analysis of drinking water biofilms in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268301
Source
Microbes Environ. 2015;30(1):99-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Katharina Lührig
Björn Canbäck
Catherine J Paul
Tomas Johansson
Kenneth M Persson
Peter Rådström
Source
Microbes Environ. 2015;30(1):99-107
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Biofilms - growth & development
Biota
Cluster analysis
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Drinking Water - microbiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sweden
Abstract
Next-generation sequencing of the V1-V2 and V3 variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene generated a total of 674,116 reads that described six distinct bacterial biofilm communities from both water meters and pipes. A high degree of reproducibility was demonstrated for the experimental and analytical work-flow by analyzing the communities present in parallel water meters, the rare occurrence of biological replicates within a working drinking water distribution system. The communities observed in water meters from households that did not complain about their drinking water were defined by sequences representing Proteobacteria (82-87%), with 22-40% of all sequences being classified as Sphingomonadaceae. However, a water meter biofilm community from a household with consumer reports of red water and flowing water containing elevated levels of iron and manganese had fewer sequences representing Proteobacteria (44%); only 0.6% of all sequences were classified as Sphingomonadaceae; and, in contrast to the other water meter communities, markedly more sequences represented Nitrospira and Pedomicrobium. The biofilm communities in pipes were distinct from those in water meters, and contained sequences that were identified as Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Desulfovibrio, and Sulfuricurvum. The approach employed in the present study resolved the bacterial diversity present in these biofilm communities as well as the differences that occurred in biofilms within a single distribution system, and suggests that next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons can show changes in bacterial biofilm communities associated with different water qualities.
Notes
Cites: Water Res. 2013 Feb 1;47(2):503-1623182667
Cites: Microbes Environ. 2012;27(4):443-823059725
Cites: Microbes Environ. 2013;28(1):50-723124766
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2013 Oct;79(19):5962-923872556
Cites: Annu Rev Microbiol. 2000;54:81-12711018125
Cites: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2002 Sep;59(6):629-4012226718
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2003 Nov;69(11):6899-90714602654
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2003 Dec;69(12):7298-30914660379
Cites: Water Sci Technol. 2004;49(2):27-3214982160
Cites: Nat Rev Microbiol. 2004 Feb;2(2):95-10815040259
Cites: Annu Rev Microbiol. 1985;39:321-463904603
Cites: Microbiol Rev. 1995 Mar;59(1):143-697535888
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1997 Nov;63(11):4164-709361400
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2005 Feb;71(2):706-1215691920
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2006 Mar;72(3):1858-7216517632
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2006 Jul 1;34(Web Server issue):W394-916845035
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2006 Nov 1;22(21):2688-9016928733
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2007 Aug;73(16):5261-717586664
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2007 Apr;9(4):944-5317359266
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2007 Jan 1;23(1):127-817050570
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2009 Dec;11(12):3132-919659500
Cites: Biotechniques. 2009 Nov;47(5):951-820041848
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2010 Apr;76(8):2623-3220190090
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2010 Jul;12(7):1889-9820236171
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2010 Aug;76(16):5631-520581188
Cites: Nat Rev Microbiol. 2010 Sep;8(9):623-3320676145
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2010 Oct 1;26(19):2460-120709691
Cites: Int Microbiol. 2010 Jun;13(2):59-6520890840
Cites: Gene. 2010 Dec 1;469(1-2):45-5120833233
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2010 Nov;76(21):7171-8020851995
Cites: Biofouling. 2011 Feb;27(2):151-6321229405
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2011 Mar 1;27(5):611-821233169
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2011 Mar 15;27(6):863-421278185
Cites: Microbes Environ. 2011;26(2):149-5521502735
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2011 Aug 15;27(16):2194-20021700674
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(8):e2322521850263
Cites: Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 2011 Oct;100(3):471-521674231
Cites: Microbes Environ. 2012;27(1):9-1822075624
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2012 Oct 1;435-436:124-3122846772
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2012 Nov;78(22):7856-6522941076
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2013 Feb;83(2):361-7422938591
PubMed ID
25739379 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bacterial Microbiota Associated with the Glacier Ice Worm Is Dominated by Both Worm-Specific and Glacier-Derived Facultative Lineages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281829
Source
Microbes Environ. 2017 Mar 31;32(1):32-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2017
Author
Takumi Murakami
Takahiro Segawa
Roman Dial
Nozomu Takeuchi
Shiro Kohshima
Yuichi Hongoh
Source
Microbes Environ. 2017 Mar 31;32(1):32-39
Date
Mar-31-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Bacteria - classification - genetics
Biota
Cluster analysis
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Ice Cover - microbiology
Oligochaeta - microbiology
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
The community structure of bacteria associated with the glacier ice worm Mesenchytraeus solifugus was analyzed by amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Ice worms were collected from two distinct glaciers in Alaska, Harding Icefield and Byron Glacier, and glacier surfaces were also sampled for comparison. Marked differences were observed in bacterial community structures between the ice worm and glacier surface samples. Several bacterial phylotypes were detected almost exclusively in the ice worms, and these bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with either animal-associated lineages or, interestingly, clades mostly consisting of glacier-indigenous species. The former included bacteria that belong to Mollicutes, Chlamydiae, Rickettsiales, and Lachnospiraceae, while the latter included Arcicella and Herminiimonas phylotypes. Among these bacteria enriched in ice worm samples, Mollicutes, Arcicella, and Herminiimonas phylotypes were abundantly and consistently detected in the ice worm samples; these phylotypes constituted the core microbiota associated with the ice worm. A fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that Arcicella cells specifically colonized the epidermis of the ice worms. Other bacterial phylotypes detected in the ice worm samples were also abundantly recovered from the respective habitat glaciers; these bacteria may be food for ice worms to digest or temporary residents. Nevertheless, some were overrepresented in the ice worm RNA samples; they may also function as facultative gut bacteria. Our results indicate that the community structure of bacteria associated with ice worms is distinct from that in the associated glacier and includes worm-specific and facultative, glacier-indigenous lineages.
Notes
Cites: J Mol Evol. 2004 Nov;59(5):666-7315693622
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2004 Feb 25;32(4):1363-7114985472
Cites: Eur J Protistol. 2010 May;46(2):86-9520347279
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2013 Feb;63(Pt 2):412-722447701
Cites: Pathog Dis. 2015 Feb;73(1):1-1525854000
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2002 Feb;40(2):690-311825999
Cites: ISME J. 2010 Mar;4(3):357-6619924156
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Aug 2;108(31):12776-8121768380
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2011 Sep;77(17):5842-5021784904
Cites: Environ Microbiol Rep. 2015 Apr;7(2):293-30025405749
Cites: ISME J. 2015 Aug;9(8):1778-9225615437
Cites: PLoS One. 2013 Aug 20;8(8):e7258123977321
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2013 Jan;63(Pt 1):134-4022368167
Cites: Gene. 2008 Nov 1;423(2):135-4118718858
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2011 Aug 15;27(16):2194-20021700674
Cites: Environ Microbiol. 2014 Oct;16(10):3250-6224946985
Cites: Vet J. 2011 Mar;187(3):408-1020188610
Cites: Syst Appl Microbiol. 2005 Sep;28(7):596-60316156117
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e3174922363720
Cites: Nat Methods. 2010 May;7(5):335-620383131
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2016 Jul;33(7):1870-427004904
Cites: Nat Commun. 2016 Jun 22;7:1196827329445
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2000 Aug;66(8):3603-710919826
Cites: Zootaxa. 2015 Aug 18;4000(4):473-8226623738
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2011 Aug 26;152(1-2):196-921549530
Cites: Microbes Environ. 2010;25(3):171-8221576870
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2012 Apr;27(4):219-2522000675
Cites: FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2015 Mar;91(3):null25764456
Cites: Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2012 Jun;63(3):577-8422370043
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2010 Oct 1;26(19):2460-120709691
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Dec;75(23):7537-4119801464
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2013;47(23):13611-2024187936
Cites: Annu Rev Microbiol. 2007;61:169-8917506687
Cites: Genome Biol. 2014;15(12):55025516281
PubMed ID
28302989 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report II: Contaminant Levels, Trends and Effects in the Biological Environment

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297314
Source
Government of Canada, Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs. 175 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2003
addresses these priority areas and to assess the current state of knowledge on the spatial and temporal trends of contaminants and the biological effects in Canadian Arctic biota. The CACAR-II series consists of a Highlights report and four technical reports: human health, biological environment, physical
  1 document  
Author
Fisk, Aaron T.
Hobbs, Karen
Muir, Derek C.G.
Source
Government of Canada, Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs. 175 p.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6546485
Keywords
Northern Canada
Contaminants
Biota
Wildlife
Health
Abstract
Highlights of the research conducted on Arctic biota under NCP Phase II include: improved temporal trend data sets of organic and metal contaminants; expanded spatial trends of mercury and organochlorines (OCs) in freshwater and marine biota; new knowledge of food web dynamics of organic and metal contaminants; and the identification and measurement of a suite of new anthropogenic contaminants.
Documents

CACAR-Levels-Trends-Effects.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

67 records – page 1 of 7.