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685 records – page 1 of 69.

[20-year experience with modified dose fractionation of radiotherapy in primary Hodgkin's disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154608
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2008;54(4):529-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
N V Il'in
E N Nikolaeva
E V Smirnova
Iu N Vinogradova
E I Ivanova
B M Izotov
I A Shenderova
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2008;54(4):529-31
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biomedical research
Disease-Free Survival
Dose Fractionation
Female
Hodgkin Disease - radiotherapy
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Leukopenia - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pericarditis - epidemiology - etiology
Pneumonia - epidemiology - etiology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Thrombocytopenia - epidemiology - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Significantly lower frequency of relapse, incidence of pulmonitis and pericarditis, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia stage IV and longer recurrence-free survival were reported after acceleration of multifractionation of STD of 1.35Gy was used for treatment of patients with primary Hodgkin's disease, as compared with standard fractionation. When STD was reduced to 1.2Gy (modified multifractionation), subtotal exposure of lymph nodes was followed by a significant drop in frequency and severity of leukopenia and thrombocytopenia stage III-IV. The latter complications, rates decreased further, with perspective response to therapy, as irradiation was limited to that of areas exposed during modified multifractionation.
PubMed ID
18942416 View in PubMed
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[50 years anniversary of Research Institute for Occupational Medicine and Human Ecology with Siberian Division of RAMSc].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137599
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(10):1-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
V S Rukavishnikov
S F Shaiakhmetov
T M Gus'kova
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(10):1-5
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - history
Anniversaries and Special Events
Biomedical Research - history
Ecology - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Occupational Medicine - history
Siberia
Abstract
The article covers main steps of establishment and development of Research Institute for Occupational medicine and Human ecology with Siberian Division of RAMSc over 50 years of activities, major results of research, contribution of the Institute personnel into development of hygienic science and practical medicine in Siberia.
PubMed ID
21265049 View in PubMed
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110 million dollars vaccine research centre to be built in Saskatoon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164710
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Mar 13;176(6):751
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-13-2007
Source
Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):794-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-2005
Source
Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):794-5
Date
Oct-6-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Biomedical Research - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Evolution, Molecular
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history - prevention & control - virology
Orthomyxoviridae - genetics - pathogenicity
Publishing
Time Factors
Virulence - genetics
Virulence Factors
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2006 Jan 19;439(7074):26616421546
Comment On: Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):889-9316208372
Erratum In: Nature. 2005 Oct 13;437(7061):940
PubMed ID
16208326 View in PubMed
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[Academician of the RAS, MD, PhD, DSc, Professor G G Onishchenko (the 65th anniversary)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270120
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015;94(8):83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015

Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284320
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Geary J1, Jardine CG, Guebert J, Bubela T.
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Date
2013
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Access to Information/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/organization & administration
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations/legislation & jurisprudence
Culture
Financing, Government
Genetics, Medical/legislation & jurisprudence
Genetics, Medical/organization & administration
Health Policy
Humans
Indians, North American/ethnology
Indians, North American/genetics
Indians, North American/legislation & jurisprudence
Documents
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Access Governance for Biobanks: The Case of the BioSHaRE-EU Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279361
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2016 Jun;14(3):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Jane Kaye
Linda Briceño Moraia
Colin Mitchell
Jessica Bell
Jasper Adriaan Bovenberg
Anne-Marie Tassé
Bartha Maria Knoppers
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2016 Jun;14(3):201-6
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Biomedical Research - legislation & jurisprudence
Cooperative Behavior
Databases, Factual
European Union
Finland
Germany
Humans
Information Dissemination - legislation & jurisprudence
Interprofessional Relations
Netherlands
Norway
United Kingdom
Abstract
Currently, researchers have to apply separately to individual biobanks if they want to carry out studies that use samples and data from multiple biobanks. This article analyzes the access governance arrangements of the original five biobank members of the Biobank Standardisation and Harmonisation for Research Excellence in the European Union (BioSHaRE-EU) project in Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom to identify similarities and differences in policies and procedures, and consider the potential for internal policy "harmonization." Our analysis found differences in the range of researchers and organizations eligible to access biobanks; application processes; requirements for Research Ethics Committee approval; and terms of Material Transfer Agreements relating to ownership and commercialization. However, the main elements of access are the same across biobanks; access will be granted to bona fide researchers conducting research in the public interest, and all biobanks will consider the scientific merit of the proposed use and it's compatibility with the biobank's objectives. These findings suggest potential areas for harmonization across biobanks. This could be achieved through a single centralized application to a number of biobanks or a system of mutual recognition that places a presumption in favor of access to one biobank if already approved by another member of the same consortium. Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure-European Research Infrastructure Consortia (BBMRI-ERIC), a European consortium of biobanks and bioresources with its own ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) common service, could provide a platform by developing guidelines for harmonized internal processes.
PubMed ID
27183185 View in PubMed
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Accessing health services through the back door: a qualitative interview study investigating reasons why people participate in health research in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257231
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Townsend
Susan M Cox
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada. atownsen@exchange.ubc.ca.
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altruism
Biomedical research
British Columbia
Communication
Comprehension
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Motivation
Patient Selection
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Subjects - psychology
Therapeutic Misconception
Abstract
Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. This paper contributes to more recent qualitative approaches to understanding how and why people come to participate in various types of health research. We focus on the experience of participating and the meanings research participation has for people within the context of their lives and their health and illness biographies.
This is a qualitative exploratory study informed by grounded theory strategies. Thirty-nine participants recruited in British Columbia and Manitoba, Canada, who had taken part in a diverse range of health research studies participated in semi-structured interviews. Participants described their experiences of health research participation including motivations for volunteering. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparisons. Coding and data management was supported by Nvivo-7.
A predominant theme to emerge was 'participation in health research to access health services.' Participants described research as ways of accessing: (1) Medications that offered (hope of) relief; (2) better care; (3) technologies for monitoring health or illness. Participants perceived standard medical care to be a "trial and error" process akin to research, which further blurred the boundaries between research and treatment.
Our findings have implications for recruitment, informed consent, and the dichotomizing of medical/health procedures as either research or treatment. Those with low health status may be more vulnerable to potential coercion, suggesting the need for a more cautious approach to obtaining consent. Our findings also indicate the need for boundary work in order to better differentiate treatment and research. It is important however to acknowledge a categorical ambiguity; it is not always the case that people are misinformed about the possible benefits of research procedures (i.e., therapeutic misconception); our participants were aware that the primary purpose of research is to gain new knowledge yet they also identified a range of actual health benefits arising from their participation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24119203 View in PubMed
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685 records – page 1 of 69.