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Bioethics for clinicians: 17. Conflict of interest in research, education and patient care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203787
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1998
Author
T. Lemmens
P A Singer
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ont. trudo.lemmens@utoronto.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):960-5
Date
Oct-20-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bioethics
Biomedical research
Canada
Conflict of Interest
Disclosure
Education, Medical - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Empirical Research
Ethics, Medical
Gift Giving
Health Policy
Humans
Patient Care - standards
Research - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Social Control, Formal
Trust
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
A conflict of interest occurs in a situation in which professional judgement regarding a primary interest, such as research, education or patient care, may be unduly influenced by a secondary interest, such as financial gain or personal prestige. Conflicts of interest exist in every walk of life, including medicine and science. There is nothing inherently unethical in finding oneself in a conflict of interest. Rather, the key questions are whether one recognizes the conflict and how one deals with it. Strategies include disclosing the conflict, establishing a system of review and authorization, and prohibiting the activities that lead to the conflict.
Notes
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Cites: JAMA. 1998 Apr 1;279(13):1031-29533505
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Apr 1;279(13):995-99533497
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Cites: JAMA. 1991 May 8;265(18):2304-52016819
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Oct 3;264(13):1693-72398609
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Jul 5;323(1):562355959
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Cites: Am J Med. 1982 Jul;73(1):4-87091173
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1998 Mar;13(3):151-49541370
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):78410189418
PubMed ID
9834723 View in PubMed
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The CMA's Health Information Privacy Code: does it go too far?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203789
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):953-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1998
Author
J. Hoey
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):953-4
Date
Oct-20-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Canada
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence
Disclosure
Health Policy
Humans
Information Dissemination
Informed consent
Patient Participation
Physician-Patient Relations
Public Health
Societies, Medical
Truth Disclosure
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Aug 27;278(8):624-69272883
Cites: BMJ. 1998 May 2;316(7141):1331-29563980
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Jun 2;158(11):1473-99629112
Comment On: CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):997-10169834730
PubMed ID
9834721 View in PubMed
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Constraints of interest: lessons at the Hospital for Sick Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203788
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):955-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1998
Author
R A Phillips
J. Hoey
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):955-7
Date
Oct-20-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic - economics - standards
Conflict of Interest
Contracts
Disclosure
Ethics Committees, Research
Guidelines as Topic
Hospitals, Pediatric - economics
Hospitals, University - economics
Humans
Information Dissemination
Informed consent
Iron Chelating Agents - therapeutic use
Iron Overload - drug therapy - etiology
Ontario
Publishing
Pyridones - therapeutic use
Research Subjects
Research Support as Topic
beta-Thalassemia - complications
Notes
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1998 Aug 15;129(4):341-49729203
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Aug 13;339(7):468-99700182
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1995 Apr 6;332(14):918-227877649
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Jan 8;338(2):101-69420342
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Aug 13;339(7):417-239700174
Comment On: CMAJ. 1998 Oct 20;159(8):983-69834727
Erratum In: CMAJ 1998 Nov 17;159(10):1244
PubMed ID
9834722 View in PubMed
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Controversial "reprotech" royal commission faces growing criticism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225383
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Nov 15;145(10):1371-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1991

The ethics of data utilisation: a comparison between epidemiology and journalism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218819
Source
BMJ. 1994 Feb 19;308(6927):522-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-1994
Author
C G Westrin
T. Nilstun
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 1994 Feb 19;308(6927):522-3
Date
Feb-19-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Civil Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Data Collection - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Epidemiology - standards
Ethics, Medical
Government Regulation
Humans
Journalism, Medical - standards
Risk assessment
Social Justice
Sweden
Abstract
Legal controls over data collection in European countries have badly affected the work of epidemiologists. By contrast, journalists have been allowed far greater freedoms. The aims and tasks of both professions are in line with accepted values in our society--especially those of inquiry and the benefits of an open society. Society seems willing to accept that, in the interests of wider public good, journalism may sometimes invade individuals' privacy and do them harm, but it is not prepared to offer epidemiology an equal measure of tolerance.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1990 Mar;19(1):226-911642774
Cites: Lakartidningen. 1989 Sep 13;86(37):3050-32796491
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Mar 21;304(6829):727-81571673
Comment In: BMJ. 1994 Feb 19;308(6927):4908136664
PubMed ID
8136673 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.