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Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284320
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Geary J1, Jardine CG, Guebert J, Bubela T.
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Date
2013
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Access to Information/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/organization & administration
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations/legislation & jurisprudence
Culture
Financing, Government
Genetics, Medical/legislation & jurisprudence
Genetics, Medical/organization & administration
Health Policy
Humans
Indians, North American/ethnology
Indians, North American/genetics
Indians, North American/legislation & jurisprudence
Documents
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Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction at the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland: diverse problems, diverse perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130545
Source
Addiction. 2012 Oct;107(10):1741-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Pekka Hakkarainen
Kalervo Kiianmaa
Kimmo Kuoppasalmi
Christoffer Tigerstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland. pekka.hakkarainen@thl.fi
Source
Addiction. 2012 Oct;107(10):1741-6
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - organization & administration - trends
Biomedical Research - organization & administration - trends
Creativity
Finland
Forecasting
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Abstract
The Department of Alcohol, Drugs and Addiction started operations on 1 January 2009, when the National Institute of Public Health (KTL) and the National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES) were merged. The newly formed institute, called the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), operates under the Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. The scope of the research and preventive work conducted in the Department covers alcohol, drugs, tobacco and gambling issues. The two main tasks of the Department are (i) to research, produce and disseminate information on alcohol and drugs, substance use, addictions and their social and health-related effects and (ii) to develop prevention and good practices with a view to counteracting the onset and development of alcohol and drug problems and the damaging effects of smoking and other addictions. The number of staff hovers at approximately 60 people. The Department is organized into three units, one specialized in social sciences (the Alcohol and Drug Research Unit), another in laboratory analytics (the Alcohol and Drug Analytics Unit) and the third primarily in preventive work (the Addiction Prevention Unit). These units incorporate a rich variety and long traditions of both research and preventive work. The mixture of different disciplines creates good opportunities for interdisciplinary research projects and collaboration within the Department. Also, the fact that in the same administrative context there are both researchers and people specialized in preventive work opens up interesting possibilities for combining efforts from these two branches. Nationally, the Department is a key player in all its fields of interest. It engages in a great deal of cooperation both nationally and internationally, and among its strengths are the high-quality, regularly collected long-term data sets.
PubMed ID
21992550 View in PubMed
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An agenda for occupational therapy's contribution to collaborative chronic disease research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133487
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2011 Jun;78(3):147-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Carri L Hand
Lori J Letts
Claudia M von Zweck
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, 1400 Main St. W. Hamilton, ON, L8S 1C7. handc@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2011 Jun;78(3):147-55
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Canada
Chronic Disease - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
To meet the needs of adults with chronic diseases, Canadian health care is moving toward more interdisciplinary, collaborative practice. There is limited high-quality evidence to support practice in this area. Occupational therapists can play a significant role in this area of practice and research.
To develop an agenda of priority areas within collaborative chronic disease research to which occupational therapy can make a contribution.
The project involved literature and Internet review, a consensus meeting with a range of stakeholders, a survey of occupational therapists, and synthesis of findings to create a research agenda.
An interdisciplinary and intersectoral group of stakeholders identified seven main priority areas. One priority is specific to occupational therapy while the remaining six cross disciplines.
The research agenda can support funding applications and encourage interdisciplinary research collaboration to ultimately produce research evidence that can benefit people with chronic diseases.
PubMed ID
21699008 View in PubMed
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Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Jun;65(3):271-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Juhani Leppäluoto
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Jun;65(3):271-2
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biological Specimen Banks
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Health status
Humans
Life Style
PubMed ID
16871833 View in PubMed
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Bridging the gap between clinical research and knowledge translation in pediatric emergency medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160586
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2007 Nov;14(11):968-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Lisa Hartling
Shannon Scott-Findlay
David Johnson
Martin Osmond
Amy Plint
Jeremy Grimshaw
Terry P Klassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2007 Nov;14(11):968-77
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Canada
Child
Diffusion of Innovation
Emergency Medicine - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Information Dissemination
Knowledge
Abstract
In 2006, a multidisciplinary group of researchers from across Canada submitted a successful application to the Canadian Institutes for Health Research for a Canadian Institutes for Health Research Team in Pediatric Emergency Medicine. The conceptual foundation for the proposal was to bring together two areas deemed critical for optimizing health outcomes: clinical research and knowledge translation (KT). The framework for the proposed work is an iterative figure-eight model that provides logical steps for research and a seamless flow between the development and evaluation of therapeutic interventions (clinical research) and the implementation and uptake of those interventions that prove to be effective (KT). Under the team grant, we will conduct seven distinct projects relating to the two most common medical problems affecting children in the emergency department: respiratory illness and injury. The projects span the research continuum, with some projects targeting problems for which there is little evidence, while other projects involve problems with a strong evidence base but require further work in the KT realm. In this article, we describe the history of the research team, the research framework, the individual research projects, and the structure of the team, including coordination and administration. We also highlight some of the many advantages of bringing this research program together under the umbrella of a team grant, including opportunities for cross-fertilization of ideas, collaboration among multiple disciplines and centers, training of students and junior researchers, and advancing a methodological research agenda.
PubMed ID
17967958 View in PubMed
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Building a community-based participatory research center to investigate obesity and diabetes in Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3077
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Jun;64(3):281-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Boyer, BB
Mohatt, GV
Lardon, C
Plaetke, R
Luick, BR
Hutchison. SH
Antunez de Mayolo, G
Ruppert, E
Bersamin, A
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 99775, USA. bert.boyer@uaf.edu
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Jun;64(3):281-90
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Diversity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - ethnology
Epidemiologic Studies
Genetic Research
Humans
Inuits
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Rural Population
Abstract
The Center for Alaska Native Health Research (CANHR) is a community-based participatory research project aimed at understanding current risk factors for obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in Alaska Natives living in Southwest Alaska. We utilize a multidisciplinary approach that includes assessment of genetic, nutritional and behavioral risk factors and their interrelationships with one another in the overall development of disease. The design of the CANHR project involved community participation in the development, implementation and interpretation of research results. We have developed a participatory research program that is designed to be culturally appropriate, relevant to community needs and interests, and respectful to our participants. This manuscript describes the organizational development of our CANHR study and the procedures employed in its progression to date.
PubMed ID
16050322 View in PubMed
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Building the backbone for organisational research in public health systems: development of measures of organisational capacity for chronic disease prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162461
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Aug;61(8):742-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Nancy Hanusaik
Jennifer L O'Loughlin
Natalie Kishchuk
John Eyles
Kerry Robinson
Roy Cameron
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, 1020 Pine Avenue West, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3S 1A2. nancy.hanusaik@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Aug;61(8):742-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Canada
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Organizations
Principal Component Analysis
Psychometrics
Public Health
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
: Research to investigate levels of organisational capacity in public health systems to reduce the burden of chronic disease is challenged by the need for an integrative conceptual model and valid quantitative organisational level measures.
To develop measures of organisational capacity for chronic disease prevention/healthy lifestyle promotion (CDP/HLP), its determinants, and its outcomes, based on a new integrative conceptual model.
Items measuring each component of the model were developed or adapted from existing instruments, tested for content validity, and pilot tested. Cross sectional data were collected in a national telephone survey of all 216 national, provincial, and regional organisations that implement CDP/HLP programmes in Canada. Psychometric properties of the measures were tested using principal components analysis (PCA) and by examining inter-rater reliability.
PCA based scales showed generally excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.70 to 0.88). Reliability coefficients for selected measures were variable (weighted kappa(kappa(w)) = 0.11 to 0.77). Indicators of organisational determinants were generally positively correlated with organisational capacity (r(s) = 0.14-0.45, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
17630377 View in PubMed
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Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society 2011 Royal College lecture: anesthesiology: a profession at a crossroads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121928
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2012 Sep;59(9):882-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Beverley A Orser
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada. beverley.orser@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2012 Sep;59(9):882-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia - methods
Anesthesiology - organization & administration
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Canada
Humans
Perioperative Care - methods
PubMed ID
22865204 View in PubMed
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Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121497
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):607-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gretchen Snyman
Joseph E L Tucker
Massimo Cimini
Kishan Narine
Paul W M Fedak
Author Affiliation
Master of Biomedical Technology Program, Faculty of Graduate Studies, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):607-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Canada
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Leadership
Male
Organizational Innovation
Quality Improvement
Questionnaires
Abstract
Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada.
PubMed ID
22902159 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.