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Anti-TNF therapy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: the Finnish experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164877
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2007 Oct;26(10):1693-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Liisa Konttinen
Riitta Tuompo
Tea Uusitalo
Riitta Luosujärvi
Kari Laiho
Jukka Lähteenmäki
Maija Puurtinen-Vilkki
Ritva Lanteri
Saara Kortelainen
Helena Karilainen
Tuire Varjolahti-Lehtinen
Dan Nordström
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2007 Oct;26(10):1693-700
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Therapy - methods
Blood Sedimentation
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - drug therapy - ethnology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - antagonists & inhibitors - chemistry
Abstract
Biological therapy for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has led to improved disease control beyond that of conventional treatments. International recommendations encourage clinicians prescribing biological treatments to register patients in national registers to collect information on outcome and toxicity. Patients with AS (n = 229) from the Register of Biological Treatment in Finland (ROB-FIN) with severe disease of long duration were followed-up for up to 24 months. Due to an active disease, one or more concomitant disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) were used by 86% at commencement of biological therapy. This add-on strategy with infliximab led to a rapid pain relief and improvement of patient's and physician's global assessments, C-reactive protein/erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and swollen and tender joint counts within 6 weeks. Concomitant use of NSAID and oral corticosteroid was reduced. Corresponding results were documented at 3 months with etanercept, which was more recently approved for the treatment of spondyloarthropathies. Seventy-nine percent of the patients were ASAS 20 responders. A subgroup of AS patients with only axial involvement (n = 46) responded correspondingly. The first biological drug was discontinued in only 7% due to lack of efficacy and in 6% due to adverse events. Anti-TNF agents, often used in combination with DMARDs, appeared to have persistent effectiveness and limited toxicity in a real-life clinical setting in a cohort of Finnish AS patients with severe disease and long disease duration.
PubMed ID
17332979 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Biological therapy in rheumatoid arthritis based on ten years of registry surveillance in Finland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142276
Source
Duodecim. 2010;126(12):1487-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Liisa Virkki
Kalle Aaltonen
Dan Nordström
Author Affiliation
HYKS:n yleissisätautien ja reumatologian klinikka, PL 340, 00029 HUS.
Source
Duodecim. 2010;126(12):1487-95
Date
2010
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - therapy
Biological Therapy - methods
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Population Surveillance
Registries
Abstract
Biological drugs are used in the treatment of active inflammatory athritides refractory to conventional treatment. Data from the Finnish registry of biological treatment (ROB-FIN) indicates that the effectiveness of the biologicals in clinical practice corresponds to or even excels that of randomized controlled clinical trials, and seems to endure in patients continuing treatment. About one-fifth of rheumatoid arthritis patients discontinue treatment due to lack of effectiveness, and one-tenth due to adverse events. Serious adverse events were seen in 2.5% of all patients. In the future electronic follow-up, pharmacogenetics, and biomarker research may help to better optimize treatment individually.
PubMed ID
20617752 View in PubMed
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[Experience of using bacteriophages and bitsillin-5 to reduce the incidence of respiratory diseases of bacterial ethiology in military personnel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273984
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2016 Feb;337(2):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
V G Akimkin
A A Kalmykov
R M Aminev
V S Polyakov
S V Artebyakin
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2016 Feb;337(2):36-40
Date
Feb-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bacterial Infections - mortality - prevention & control
Bacteriophages
Biological Therapy - methods
Humans
Incidence
Male
Military Medicine
Military Personnel
Penicillin G Benzathine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Respiratory Tract Infections - mortality - prevention & control
Russia
Abstract
The authors defined epidemiological efficacy and safety of the use of bacteriophages(streptococcal, staphylococcal, piobakferiophage multipartial) and bitsillin-5 to reduce tonsillitis morbidityand other respiratory diseases with bacterial etiology in groups of servicemen during their formationagainst increase of seasonal morbidity. The results of the use of these preventive agents were evaluatedby a comparative analysis of this disease in experimental and control groups. In total 510 healthy conscriptswere involved into the study. The effectiveness of prophylactic use of bacteriophages and bitsillin-5, whichprovided a reduction in the incidence of respiratory infections of bacterial ethiology, tonsillitis, and otherrespiratory diseases is showed. Recommendations on the choice of drugsfor the prevention of these infections,methods and organization of their application in organized groups are given.
PubMed ID
27263210 View in PubMed
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[Neuroendocrine tumors of a pancreas: 30 year's experience of clinic of faculty surgery of N.N. Burdenko].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108452
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2013;(7):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
A F Chernousov
A V Egorov
G Kh Musaev
E V Fominykh
S A Kondrashin
I A Vasil'ev
V A Parnova
O V Anisimova
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2013;(7):13-9
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Biological Therapy - methods
Diagnosis, Differential
Diagnostic Imaging
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Neuroendocrine Tumors - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Pancreatectomy - methods
Pancreatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
N.N. Burdenko surgery clinic have an experience of treatment of 342 patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Original algorithms of diagnosis, complex treatment and postoperative management were applied. We achieved 100% five-year survival rate after radical surgery and reduced postoperative complications 1.6 times.
PubMed ID
23887317 View in PubMed
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Rectal bacteriotherapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea: results from a case series of 55 patients in Denmark 2000-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267567
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2015 Jan;21(1):48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
M. Tvede
M. Tinggaard
M. Helms
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2015 Jan;21(1):48-53
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteria
Biological Therapy - methods
Clostridium Infections - epidemiology - therapy
Clostridium difficile
Denmark - epidemiology
Feces - microbiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most common nosocomial infections. Among other alternatives to standard treatment with vancomycin for recurrent infection are faecal microbiota transplantation and rectal bacteriotherapy with a fixed mixture of intestinal bacterial strains isolated from faeces of healthy persons to mimic a theoretical normal microflora. Developed by Dr. Tvede and Dr. Rask-Madsen, the latter method has been in use for selected patients during the last 25 years in Denmark. In this study we reviewed the medical records of patients treated with rectal bacteriotherapy for relapsing C. difficile in Denmark, 2000-2012. The primary end point was recurrent diarrhoea within 30 days after treatment. A total of 55 patients were included in this case series. Thirty-five patients (64%) had no recurrence within 30 days of bacteriotherapy. Patients with recurrence tended to be older (75.8 years vs. 61.3 years; p 0.26), and more often have preexisting gastrointestinal illness and longer duration of time from the first CDI to bacteriotherapy (221.6 days vs. 175.3 days; p 0.18). Treatment success was 80% in the subgroup of patients with no known gastrointestinal illness and first C. difficile episode less than 6 months before bacteriotherapy. The most common adverse events were abdominal pain (10.9%) and worsening diarrhoea (4.3%). One patient was hospitalized 10 days after treatment with appendicitis, fever, and Escherichia coli bacteremia. The results from this study indicate that rectal bacteriotherapy is a viable alternative to faecal microbiota transplantation in patients with relapsing C. difficile-associated diarrhoea.
PubMed ID
25636927 View in PubMed
Less detail

Role of the intestinal microbiota in resistance to colonization by Clostridium difficile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105040
Source
Gastroenterology. 2014 May;146(6):1547-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Robert A Britton
Vincent B Young
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan.
Source
Gastroenterology. 2014 May;146(6):1547-53
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Bile Acids and Salts - metabolism
Biological Therapy - methods
Clostridium difficile - growth & development - metabolism - pathogenicity
Disease Models, Animal
Dysbiosis
Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous - metabolism - microbiology - prevention & control
Feces - microbiology
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Humans
Intestines - drug effects - metabolism - microbiology
Microbiota - drug effects
Probiotics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Antibiotic-associated infection with the bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile is a major cause of morbidity and increased health care costs. C difficile infection follows disruption of the indigenous gut microbiota by antibiotics. Antibiotics create an environment within the intestine that promotes C difficile spore germination, vegetative growth, and toxin production, leading to epithelial damage and colitis. Studies of patients with C difficile infection and animal models have shown that the indigenous microbiota can inhibit expansion and persistence of C difficile. Although the specific mechanisms of these processes are not known, they are likely to interfere with key aspects of the pathogen's physiology, including spore germination and competitive growth. Increasing our understanding of how the intestinal microbiota manage C difficile could lead to better means of controlling this important nosocomial pathogen.
PubMed ID
24503131 View in PubMed
Less detail

Stem cells of the lower limb: their role and potential in management of critical limb ischemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107570
Source
Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2013 Oct;238(10):1118-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Colin A Hart
Janice Tsui
Achal Khanna
David J Abraham
Daryll M Baker
Author Affiliation
Royal Free Vascular Unit, Division of Surgery & Interventional Science, UCL, Royal Free Campus, London NW3 2QG, UK.
Source
Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2013 Oct;238(10):1118-26
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amputation
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - pathology - therapy
Biological Therapy - methods
Humans
Ischemia - pathology - therapy
Lower Extremity - physiology
Peripheral Arterial Disease - pathology - therapy
Stem Cells - physiology
Abstract
Peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) contributes to decreased exercise tolerance, poor balance, impaired proprioception, muscle atrophy and weakness, with advanced cases resulting in critical limb ischemia (CLI) where the viability of the limb is threatened. Patients with a diagnosis of CLI have a poor life expectancy due to concomitant cardio and cerebrovascular diseases. The current treatment options to avoid major amputation by re-establishing a blood supply to the limb generally have poor outcomes. Human skeletal muscle contains both multipotent stem cells and progenitor cells and thus has a capacity for regeneration. Phase I and II studies involving transplantation of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells into CLI limbs show positive effects on wound healing and angiogenesis; the increase in quiescent satellite cell numbers observed in CLI muscle may also provide a sufficient in vivo source of resident stem cells. These indigenous cells have been shown to be capable of forming multiple mesodermal cell lineages aiding the repair and regeneration of chronically ischemic muscle. They may also serve as a repository for autologous transplantation. The behavior and responses of the stem cell population in CLI is poorly understood and this review tries to elucidate the potential of these cells and their future role in the management of CLI.
PubMed ID
23996960 View in PubMed
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Subsequent entry biologics/biosimilars: a viewpoint from Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121288
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2012 Sep;31(9):1289-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Anthony S Russell
Vandana Ahluwalla
Cheryl Barnabe
Shahin Jamal
Robert C Offer
Wojciech P Olszynski
Kam Shojania
Boulos Haraoui
Author Affiliation
562 Heritage Medical Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G2S2, Canada. as.russell@ualberta.ca
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 2012 Sep;31(9):1289-92
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Biological Therapy - methods
Biosimilar Pharmaceuticals - therapeutic use
Canada
Chemistry, Pharmaceutical - methods
DNA - metabolism
Drug Costs
Drug Industry - trends
Humans
Patient Safety
Recombination, Genetic
Rheumatology - trends
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We have reviewed the issues surrounding the advent of biosimilars in the rheumatoid arthritis biologic field. Our proposals emphasize the need to focus primarily on patient safety and to assess the outcomes of therapy both in the short and longer term.
PubMed ID
22923182 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.