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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Anaerobic co-digestion of acetate-rich with lignin-rich wastewater and the effect of hydrotalcite addition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279741
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:84-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Lourdes Rodriguez-Chiang
Jordi Llorca
Olli Dahl
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2016 Oct;218:84-91
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - chemistry - metabolism
Aluminum Hydroxide - chemistry
Anaerobiosis
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Finland
Lignin - chemistry - metabolism
Magnesium Hydroxide - chemistry
Methane - biosynthesis
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
The methane potential and biodegradability of different ratios of acetate and lignin-rich effluents from a neutral sulfite semi-chemical (NSSC) pulp mill were investigated. Results showed ultimate methane yields up to 333±5mLCH4/gCOD when only acetate-rich substrate was added and subsequently lower methane potentials of 192±4mLCH4/gCOD when the lignin fraction was increased. The presence of lignin showed a linear decay in methane production, resulting in a 41% decrease in methane when the lignin-rich feed had a 30% increase. A negative linear correlation between lignin content and biodegradability was also observed. Furthermore, the effect of hydrotalcite (HT) addition was evaluated and showed increase in methane potential of up to 8%, a faster production rate and higher soluble lignin removal (7-12% higher). Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies between 64 and 83% were obtained for all samples.
PubMed ID
27347802 View in PubMed
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Application of microbial fuel cell technology for wastewater treatment and electricity generation under Nordic countries climate conditions: Study of performance and microbial communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299327
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2018 Dec; 270:1-10
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Alejandro Gonzalez-Martínez
Su Chengyuan
Alejandro Rodriguez-Sanchez
Clementina Pozo
Jesus Gonzalez-Lopez
Riku Vahala
Author Affiliation
Institute of Water Research, University of Granada, C/Ramon y Cajal, 4, 18071 Granada, Spain. Electronic address: agon@ugr.es.
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2018 Dec; 270:1-10
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bioelectric Energy Sources - microbiology
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Climate
Cold Temperature
Electricity
Finland
Microbiota
Sewage
Temperature
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
Two microbial fuel cells were inoculated with activated sludge from Finland and operated under moderate (25?°C) and low (8?°C) temperatures. Operation under real urban wastewater showed similarities in chemical oxygen demand removal and voltage generated, although moderate temperature supported higher ammonium oxidation. Fungi disappeared in the microbial fuel cell operated at temperature of 25?°C. Archaea domain was dominated by methanogenic archaea at both temperature scenarios. Important differences were observed in bacterial communities between both temperatures, however generating similar voltage. The results supported that the implementation of microbial fuel cells in Nordic countries operating under real conditions could be successful, as well as suggested the flexibility of cold-adapted inoculum for starting-up microbial fuel cells, regardless of the operating temperature of the system, obtaining higher COD removal and voltage generation performances at low temperature than at moderate temperature.
PubMed ID
30199700 View in PubMed
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Bioelectrochemical anaerobic sewage treatment technology for Arctic communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297771
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32844-32850
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Boris Tartakovsky
Yehuda Kleiner
Michelle-France Manuel
Author Affiliation
National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Ave, Montreal, QC, H4P 2R2, Canada. Boris.Tartakovsky@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32844-32850
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Biofuels
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Bioreactors - microbiology
Carbon - metabolism
Electrochemical Techniques - instrumentation - methods
Electrolysis
Equipment Design
Methane - biosynthesis
Sewage - chemistry
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - instrumentation - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
This study describes a novel wastewater treatment technology suitable for small remote northern communities. The technology is based on an enhanced biodegradation of organic carbon through a combination of anaerobic methanogenic and microbial electrochemical (bioelectrochemical) degradation processes leading to biomethane production. The microbial electrochemical degradation is achieved in a membraneless flow-through bioanode-biocathode setup operating at an applied voltage below the water electrolysis threshold. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests conducted through a broad range of mesophilic and psychrophilic temperatures (5-23 °C) using synthetic wastewater showed a biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) removal efficiency of 90-97% and an effluent BOD5 concentration as low as 7 mg L-1. An electricity consumption of 0.6 kWh kg-1 of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removed was observed. Low energy consumption coupled with enhanced methane production led to a net positive energy balance in the bioelectrochemical treatment system.
PubMed ID
28105595 View in PubMed
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Dynamic model of a municipal wastewater stabilization pond in the arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298048
Source
Water Res. 2018 11 01; 144:444-453
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
11-01-2018
Author
Didac Recio-Garrido
Yehuda Kleiner
Andrew Colombo
Boris Tartakovsky
Author Affiliation
National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Ave, Montreal, QC, H4P 2R2, Canada.
Source
Water Res. 2018 11 01; 144:444-453
Date
11-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Ammonia - metabolism
Anaerobiosis
Arctic Regions
Biodegradation, Environmental
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Ice
Models, Theoretical
Ponds
Sewage
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
Waste stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are the method of choice for sewage treatment in most arctic communities because they can operate in extreme climate conditions, require a relatively modest investment, are passive and therefore easy and inexpensive to operate and maintain. However, most arctic WSPs are currently limited in their ability to remove carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD), total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia-nitrogen. An arctic WSP differs from a 'southern' WSP in the way it is operated and in the conditions under which it operates. Consequently, existing WSP models cannot be used to gain better understanding of the arctic lagoon performance. This work describes an Arctic-specific WSP model. It accounts for both aerobic and anaerobic degradation pathways of organic materials and considers the periodic nature of WSP operation as well as the partial or complete freeze of the water in the WSP during winter. A uniform, multi-layer (ice, aerobic, anaerobic and sludge) approach was taken in the model development, which simplified and expedited numerical solution of the model, enabling efficient model calibration to available field data.
PubMed ID
30064078 View in PubMed
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Electrocoagulation treatment of peat bog drainage water containing humic substances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270004
Source
Water Res. 2015 Aug 1;79:79-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2015
Author
V. Kuokkanen
T. Kuokkanen
J. Rämö
U. Lassi
Source
Water Res. 2015 Aug 1;79:79-87
Date
Aug-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Color
Electrolysis
Finland
Humic Substances
Industrial Waste
Soil
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - chemistry
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment of 100 mg/L synthetic wastewater (SWW) containing humic acids was optimized (achieving 90% CODMn and 80% DOC removal efficiencies), after which real peat bog drainage waters (PBDWs) from three northern Finnish peat bogs were also treated. High pollutant removal efficiencies were achieved: Ptot, TS, and color could be removed completely, while Ntot, CODMn, and DOC/TOC removal efficiencies were in the range of 33-41%, 75-90%, and 62-75%, respectively. Al and Fe performed similarly as the anode material. Large scale experiments (1 m(3)) using cold (T = 10-11 °C) PBDWs were also conducted successfully, with optimal treatment times of 60-120 min (applying current densities of 60-75 A/m(2)). Residual values of Al and Fe (complete removal) were lower than their initial values in the EC-treated PBDWs. Electricity consumption and operational costs in optimum conditions were found to be low and similar for all the waters studied: 0.94 kWh/m(3) and 0.15 €/m(3) for SWW and 0.35-0.70 kWh/m(3) and 0.06-0.12 €/m(3) for the PBDWs (large-scale). Thus, e.g. solar cells could be considered as a power source for this EC application. In conclusion, EC treatment of PBDW containing humic substances was shown to be feasible.
PubMed ID
25973580 View in PubMed
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Evidence for key enzymatic controls on metabolism of Arctic river organic matter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262873
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Apr;20(4):1089-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Paul J Mann
William V Sobczak
Madeleine M Larue
Ekaterina Bulygina
Anna Davydova
Jorien E Vonk
John Schade
Sergei Davydov
Nikita Zimov
Robert M Holmes
Robert G M Spencer
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2014 Apr;20(4):1089-100
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Carbon - analysis - metabolism
Ecosystem
Enzymes - chemistry - metabolism
Glucosidases - metabolism
Monophenol Monooxygenase - chemistry - metabolism
Nitrogen - analysis
Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases - metabolism
Polyphenols - analysis - metabolism
Rivers
Siberia
Abstract
Permafrost thaw in the Arctic driven by climate change is mobilizing ancient terrigenous organic carbon (OC) into fluvial networks. Understanding the controls on metabolism of this OC is imperative for assessing its role with respect to climate feedbacks. In this study, we examined the effect of inorganic nutrient supply and dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition on aquatic extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) in waters draining the Kolyma River Basin (Siberia), including permafrost-derived OC. Reducing the phenolic content of the DOM pool resulted in dramatic increases in hydrolase EEAs (e.g., phosphatase activity increased >28-fold) supporting the idea that high concentrations of polyphenolic compounds in DOM (e.g., plant structural tissues) inhibit enzyme synthesis or activity, limiting OC degradation. EEAs were significantly more responsive to inorganic nutrient additions only after phenolic inhibition was experimentally removed. In controlled mixtures of modern OC and thawed permafrost endmember OC sources, respiration rates per unit dissolved OC were 1.3-1.6 times higher in waters containing ancient carbon, suggesting that permafrost-derived OC was more available for microbial mineralization. In addition, waters containing ancient permafrost-derived OC supported elevated phosphatase and glucosidase activities. Based on these combined results, we propose that both composition and nutrient availability regulate DOM metabolism in Arctic aquatic ecosystems. Our empirical findings are incorporated into a mechanistic conceptual model highlighting two key enzymatic processes in the mineralization of riverine OM: (i) the role of phenol oxidase activity in reducing inhibitory phenolic compounds and (ii) the role of phosphatase in mobilizing organic P. Permafrost-derived DOM degradation was less constrained by this initial 'phenolic-OM' inhibition; thus, informing reports of high biological availability of ancient, permafrost-derived DOM with clear ramifications for its metabolism in fluvial networks and feedbacks to climate.
PubMed ID
24115585 View in PubMed
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Modelling lake-water photochemistry: three-decade assessment of the steady-state concentration of photoreactive transients (·OH, CO3(-·) and (3)CDOM(*)) in the surface water of polymictic Lake Peipsi (Estonia/Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262461
Source
Chemosphere. 2013 Mar;90(10):2589-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Marco Minella
Elisa De Laurentiis
Olga Buhvestova
Marina Haldna
Külli Kangur
Valter Maurino
Claudio Minero
Davide Vione
Source
Chemosphere. 2013 Mar;90(10):2589-96
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Estonia
Free Radicals - analysis
Fresh Water - analysis
Hydroxyl Radical - analysis
Lakes - chemistry
Models, Chemical
Nitrites - analysis
Photochemical Processes
Principal Component Analysis
Russia
Seasons
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Over the last 3-4 decades, Lake Peipsi water (sampling site A, middle part of the lake, and site B, northern part) has experienced a statistically significant increase of bicarbonate, pH, chemical oxygen demand, nitrate (and nitrite in site B), due to combination of climate change and eutrophication. By photochemical modelling, we predicted a statistically significant decrease of radicals ?OH and CO3(-?) (site A, by 45% and 35%, respectively) and an increase of triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter ((3)CDOM(*); site B, by ~25%). These species are involved in pollutant degradation, but formation of harmful by-products is more likely with (3)CDOM(*) than with ?OH. Therefore, the photochemical self-cleansing ability of Lake Peipsi probably decreased with time, due to combined effects of climate change and eutrophication. In different environments (e.g. Lake Maggiore, NW Italy), ecosystem restoration policies had the additional advantage of enhancing sunlight-driven detoxification, suggesting that photochemical self-cleansing would be positively correlated with lake water quality.
PubMed ID
23273735 View in PubMed
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Rotating belt sieves for primary treatment, chemically enhanced primary treatment and secondary solids separation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285046
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2017 Jun;75(11-12):2598-2606
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
B. Rusten
S S Rathnaweera
E. Rismyhr
A K Sahu
J. Ntiako
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2017 Jun;75(11-12):2598-2606
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biofilms
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Bioreactors
Norway
Pilot Projects
Waste Disposal, Fluid - instrumentation - methods
Waste Water - analysis
Abstract
Fine mesh rotating belt sieves (RBS) offer a very compact solution for removal of particles from wastewater. This paper shows examples from pilot-scale testing of primary treatment, chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) and secondary solids separation of biofilm solids from moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs). Primary treatment using a 350 microns belt showed more than 40% removal of total suspended solids (TSS) and 30% removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) at sieve rates as high as 160 m³/m²-h. Maximum sieve rate tested was 288 m³/m²-h and maximum particle load was 80 kg TSS/m²-h. When the filter mat on the belt increased from 10 to 55 g TSS/m², the removal efficiency for TSS increased from about 35 to 60%. CEPT is a simple and effective way of increasing the removal efficiency of RBS. Adding about 1 mg/L of cationic polymer and about 2 min of flocculation time, the removal of TSS typically increased from 40-50% without polymer to 60-70% with polymer. Using coagulation and flocculation ahead of the RBS, separation of biofilm solids was successful. Removal efficiencies of 90% TSS, 83% total P and 84% total COD were achieved with a 90 microns belt at a sieve rate of 41 m³/m²-h.
PubMed ID
28617279 View in PubMed
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Screening biological methods for laboratory scale stabilization of fine fraction from landfill mining.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283967
Source
Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:739-747
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Tiina J Mönkäre
Marja R T Palmroth
Jukka A Rintala
Source
Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:739-747
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerobiosis
Anaerobiosis
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Finland
Gases
Laboratories
Methane - biosynthesis
Mining - methods
Sewage
Waste Disposal Facilities
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Increasing interest for the landfill mining and the amount of fine fraction (FF) in landfills (40-70% (w/w) of landfill content) mean that sustainable treatment and utilization methods for FF are needed. For this study FF (
PubMed ID
27865763 View in PubMed
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Sequential UASB and dual media packed-bed reactors for domestic wastewater treatment - experiment and simulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275701
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2016;73(12):2959-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Raúl Rodríguez-Gómez
Gunno Renman
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2016;73(12):2959-70
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Bioreactors
Models, Theoretical
Phosphorus - chemistry
Sewage - analysis
Sweden
Waste Disposal, Fluid - instrumentation - methods
Waste Water - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - chemistry
Abstract
A wastewater treatment system composed of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor followed by a packed-bed reactor (PBR) filled with Sorbulite(®) and Polonite(®) filter material was tested in a laboratory bench-scale experiment. The system was operated for 50 weeks and achieved very efficient total phosphorus (P) removal (99%), 7-day biochemical oxygen demand removal (99%) and pathogenic bacteria reduction (99%). However, total nitrogen was only moderately reduced in the system (40%). A model focusing on simulation of organic material, solids and size of granules was then implemented and validated for the UASB reactor. Good agreement between the simulated and measured results demonstrated the capacity of the model to predict the behaviour of solids and chemical oxygen demand, which is critical for successful P removal and recovery in the PBR.
PubMed ID
27332842 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.