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Adipose tissue density, a novel biomarker predicting mortality risk in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113601
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2014 Jan;69(1):109-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Rachel A Murphy
Thomas C Register
Carol A Shively
J Jeffrey Carr
Yaorong Ge
Marta E Heilbrun
Steven R Cummings
Annemarie Koster
Michael C Nevitt
Suzanne Satterfield
Frances A Tylvasky
Elsa S Strotmeyer
Anne B Newman
Eleanor M Simonsick
Ann Scherzinger
Bret H Goodpaster
Lenore J Launer
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Vilmundur Gudnason
Thomas F Lang
Stephen B Kritchevsky
Tamara B Harris
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Population Science, National Institute on Aging, 7201 Wisconsin Ave, 3C-309 Bethesda, MD 20814. rachel.murphy@nih.gov.
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2014 Jan;69(1):109-17
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adiponectin - metabolism
Adipose Tissue - metabolism - radiography
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Animals
Biological Markers - metabolism
Body mass index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leptin - metabolism
Macaca fascicularis
Male
Obesity - metabolism - mortality - radiography
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
Knowledge of adipose composition in relation to mortality may help delineate inconsistent relationships between obesity and mortality in old age. We evaluated relationships between abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) density, mortality, biomarkers, and characteristics.
VAT and SAT density were determined from computed tomography scans in persons aged 65 and older, Health ABC (n = 2,735) and AGES-Reykjavik (n = 5,131), and 24 nonhuman primates (NHPs). Associations between adipose density and mortality (4-13 years follow-up) were assessed with Cox proportional hazards models. In NHPs, adipose density was related to serum markers and tissue characteristics.
Higher density adipose tissue was associated with mortality in both studies with adjustment for risk factors including adipose area, total fat, and body mass index. In women, hazard ratio and 95% CI for the densest quintile (Q5) versus least dense (Q1) for VAT density were 1.95 (1.36-2.80; Health ABC) and 1.88 (1.31-2.69; AGES-Reykjavik) and for SAT density, 1.76 (1.35-2.28; Health ABC) and 1.56 (1.15-2.11; AGES-Reykjavik). In men, VAT density was associated with mortality in Health ABC, 1.52 (1.12-2.08), whereas SAT density was associated with mortality in both Health ABC, 1.58 (1.21-2.07), and AGES-Reykjavik, 1.43 (1.07-1.91). Higher density adipose tissue was associated with smaller adipocytes in NHPs. There were no consistent associations with inflammation in any group. Higher density adipose tissue was associated with lower serum leptin in Health ABC and NHPs, lower leptin mRNA expression in NHPs, and higher serum adiponectin in Health ABC and NHPs.
VAT and SAT density provide a unique marker of mortality risk that does not appear to be inflammation related.
PubMed ID
23707956 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue trans-fatty acids and changes in body weight and waist circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105926
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14;111(7):1283-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2014
Author
Camilla P Hansen
Tina L Berentzen
Jane N Østergaard
Christina C Dahm
Lars I Hellgren
Erik B Schmidt
Anne Tjønneland
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Kim Overvad
Marianne U Jakobsen
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14;111(7):1283-91
Date
Apr-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue, White - metabolism
Biological Markers - metabolism
Biopsy, Needle
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - metabolism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linoleic Acids, Conjugated - adverse effects - metabolism
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - etiology - metabolism - pathology
Oleic Acids - adverse effects - metabolism
Questionnaires
Registries
Trans Fatty Acids - adverse effects - metabolism
Waist Circumference
Weight Gain
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that the intake of trans-fatty acids (TFA) plays a role in the development of obesity. The proportions of adipose tissue fatty acids not synthesised endogenously in humans, such as TFA, usually correlate well with the dietary intake. Hence, the use of these biomarkers may provide a more accurate measure of habitual TFA intake than that obtained with dietary questionnaires. The objective of the present study was to investigate the associations between the proportions of specific TFA in adipose tissue and subsequent changes in weight and waist circumference (WC). The relative content of fatty acids in adipose tissue biopsies from a random sample of 996 men and women aged 50-64 years drawn from a Danish cohort study was determined by GC. Baseline data on weight, WC and potential confounders were available together with information on weight and WC 5 years after enrolment. The exposure measures were total trans-octadecenoic acids (18:1t), 18:1 ?6-10t, vaccenic acid (18:1 ?11t) and rumenic acid (18:2 ?9c, 11t). Data were analysed using multiple regression with cubic spline modelling. The median proportion of total adipose tissue 18:1t was 1.52% (90% central range 0.98, 2.19) in men and 1.47% (1.01, 2.19) in women. No significant associations were observed between the proportions of total 18:1t, 18:1 ?6-10t, vaccenic acid or rumenic acid and changes in weight or WC. The present study suggests that the proportions of specific TFA in adipose tissue are not associated with subsequent changes in weight or WC within the exposure range observed in this population.
PubMed ID
24286469 View in PubMed
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Airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel: trichloramine exposure, exhaled NO and protein profiling of nasal lavage fluids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123142
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):571-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Louise Fornander
Bijar Ghafouri
Mats Lindahl
Pål Graff
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):571-80
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Biological Markers - metabolism
Chlorides - adverse effects - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Female
Humans
Immunoblotting
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Lavage Fluid - chemistry
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Nitrogen Compounds - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Prevalence
Proteome - metabolism
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Risk factors
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Sweden - epidemiology
Swimming Pools
Abstract
Occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel was investigated. The aims of this study were to assess trichloramine exposure levels and exhaled nitric oxide in relation to the prevalence of airway symptoms in swimming pool facilities and to determine protein effects in the upper respiratory tract.
The presence of airway symptoms related to work was examined in 146 individuals working at 46 indoor swimming pool facilities. Levels of trichloramine, as well as exhaled nitric oxide, were measured in five facilities with high prevalence of airway irritation and four facilities with no airway irritation among the personnel. Nasal lavage fluid was collected, and protein profiles were determined by a proteomic approach.
17 % of the swimming pool personnel reported airway symptoms related to work. The levels of trichloramine in the swimming pool facilities ranged from 0.04 to 0.36 mg/m(3). There was no covariance between trichloramine levels, exhaled nitric oxide and prevalence of airway symptoms. Protein profiling of the nasal lavage fluid showed that the levels alpha-1-antitrypsin and lactoferrin were significantly higher, and S100-A8 was significantly lower in swimming pool personnel.
This study confirms the occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel. Our results indicate altered levels of innate immunity proteins in the upper airways that may pose as potential biomarkers. However, swimming pool facilities with high prevalence of airway irritation could not be explained by higher trichloramine exposure levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the environmental factors in indoor swimming pools that cause airway problems and affect the immune system.
PubMed ID
22729567 View in PubMed
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Albuminuria as risk factor for initiation and progression of carotid atherosclerosis in non-diabetic persons: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166327
Source
Eur Heart J. 2007 Feb;28(3):363-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Lone Jørgensen
Trond Jenssen
Stein Harald Johnsen
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Ivar Heuch
Oddmund Joakimsen
Einar Fosse
Bjarne K Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. lone.jorgensen@ism.uit.no
Source
Eur Heart J. 2007 Feb;28(3):363-9
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albuminuria - etiology
Arteriosclerosis - diagnosis
Biological Markers - metabolism
Carotid Artery Diseases - diagnosis
Cohort Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Fibrinogen - metabolism
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Abstract
High levels of microalbuminuria have been associated with severe atherosclerosis. In this prospective, population-based study, we examined whether urinary albumin-to-creatinine-ratios (ACR) in the lower range were associated with the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis.
Carotid ultrasonography and measurements of ACR, fibrinogen, monocytes, white cell count, and well-established cardiovascular risk factors were performed in 4037 non-diabetic subjects, 2203 without, and 1834 with pre-existing plaques at baseline. After 7 years new ultrasound measurements were performed. In subjects without pre-existing plaques, 884 had developed at least one plaque during follow-up. Baseline ACR was significantly related to the area of the novel plaques (P for linear trend = 0.009 over the baseline ACR quartiles, after multiple adjustments). The relationship with ACR was clearly modified by fibrinogen (P = 0.001, for the interaction ACR x fibrinogen). Subjects with high levels of both ACR and fibrinogen developed plaques with the largest area. In subjects with pre-existing plaques, ACR was related to plaque-progression (P for linear trend = 0.026, after multiple adjustments). In these individuals, the interaction between fibrinogen and ACR on plaque-growth appeared only in those with minimal atherosclerosis at baseline.
ACR is positively related to plaque-initiation and plaque-growth. This relationship is substantially modified by fibrinogen in previously plaque-free subjects.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 2007 Feb;28(3):271-317251260
PubMed ID
17132646 View in PubMed
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Amniotic fluid inflammatory cytokines: potential markers of immunologic dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128706
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2013 Sep;14(7):528-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Morsi W Abdallah
Nanna Larsen
Jakob Grove
Bent Nørgaard-Pedersen
Poul Thorsen
Erik L Mortensen
David M Hougaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Aarhus University Faculty of Health Sciences , Aarhus , Denmark.
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2013 Sep;14(7):528-38
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Amniotic Fluid - immunology - physiology
Biological Markers - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Cohort Studies
Compulsive Personality Disorder - epidemiology - immunology
Cytokines - adverse effects - physiology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Inflammation - immunology - metabolism - pathology
Inflammation Mediators - adverse effects - physiology
Pregnancy
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study was to analyze cytokine profiles in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of children developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and controls, adjusting for maternal autoimmune disorders and maternal infections during pregnancy.
AF samples of 331 ASD cases and 698 controls were analyzed for inflammatory cytokines using Luminex xMAP technology utilizing a historic birth cohort. Clinical data were retrieved from nationwide registers, and case-control differences in AF cytokine levels were assessed using chi-square tests, logistic and tobit regression models.
Overall, individuals with ASD had significantly elevated AF levels of TNF-a and TNF-ß compared to controls. Analyzing individuals diagnosed only with ICD-10 codes yielded significantly elevated levels of IL-4, IL-10, TNF-a and TNF-ß in ASD patients. Restricting analysis to infantile autism cases showed significantly elevated levels of IL-4, TNF-a and TNF-ß compared to controls with no psychiatric comorbidities. Elevated levels of IL-6 and IL-5 were found in individuals with other childhood psychiatric disorders (OCPD) when compared to controls with no psychiatric comorbidities.
AF samples of individuals with ASD or OCPD showed differential cytokine profiles compared to frequency-matched controls. Further studies to examine the specificity of the reported cytokine profiles in ASD and OCPD are required.
PubMed ID
22175527 View in PubMed
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An association between dietary arachidonic acid, measured in adipose tissue, and ulcerative colitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140034
Source
Gastroenterology. 2010 Dec;139(6):1912-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Punyanganie S A de Silva
Anja Olsen
Jane Christensen
Erik Berg Schmidt
Kim Overvaad
Anne Tjonneland
Andrew R Hart
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Norwich, United Kingdom. punyanganie@yahoo.com
Source
Gastroenterology. 2010 Dec;139(6):1912-7
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism - pathology
Aged
Arachidonic Acid - adverse effects - metabolism
Biological Markers - metabolism
Biopsy
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - metabolism
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Dietary arachidonic acid, an n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA), might be involved in the etiology of ulcerative colitis (UC). We performed a prospective cohort study to determine whether high levels of arachidonic acid in adipose tissue samples (which reflects dietary intake) are associated with UC.
We analyzed data collected from 57,053 men and women in the EPIC-Denmark Prospective Cohort Study from 1993 to 1997. Adipose tissue biopsy samples were collected from gluteal regions at the beginning of the study, the cohort was monitored over subsequent years, and participants who developed UC were identified. A subcohort of 2510 randomly selected participants were used as controls. Concentrations of arachidonic acid were measured in adipose tissue samples. In the analysis, arachidonic acid levels were divided into quartiles; relative risks (RR) were calculated and adjusted for smoking, use of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and levels of n-3 PUFAs.
A total of 34 subjects (56% men) developed incident UC at a median age of 58.8 years (range, 50.0-69.0 years). Those in the highest quartile for arachidonic acid concentrations in adipose tissue had an RR for UC of 4.16 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.56-11.04); a trend per 0.1% increase in arachidonic acid of 1.77 in RR was observed (95% CI: 1.38-2.27). The fraction attributed the highest levels of arachidonic acid was 40.3%.
Individuals with the highest relative concentrations of arachidonic acid in adipose tissue have a significantly greater risk of developing UC. Dietary modifications might therefore prevent UC or reduce disease symptoms.
PubMed ID
20950616 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of the Swedish ignition interlock program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9105
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2003 Jun;4(2):98-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Bo Bjerre
Author Affiliation
Traffic Medicine Advisory Board, Swedish National Road Administration, Borlänge, Sweden. bo.bjerre@vv.se
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2003 Jun;4(2):98-104
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control
Alanine Transaminase - metabolism
Alcohol Drinking - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcoholism - epidemiology - metabolism
Aspartate Aminotransferases - metabolism
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Biological Markers - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Liver - enzymology
Male
Pilot Projects
Protective Devices
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - metabolism
Abstract
The Swedish alcohol ignition interlock program for driving while intoxicated (DWI) offenders, both first-time as well as multiple offenders, was launched as a pilot project in 1999. It is a volunteer program and differs in some respects from other programs: It covers a period of 2 years, it includes very strict medical regulations entailing regular checkups by a physician, it does not require a prior period of hard suspension, and it focuses strongly on changes in alcohol habits. Records from the 5 years prior to the offence showed that DWI offenders are generally in a high-risk category long before their offense, with a four to five times higher accident rate (road accidents reported by the police) and a three to four times higher rate of hospitalization due to a road accident. Only 12% of the eligible DWI offenders took part in the program and, of these, 60% could be diagnosed as alcohol dependent or alcohol abusers. During the program, alcohol consumption is monitored through self-esteem questionnaires (AUDIT) and five different biological markers. Our data show a noticeable reduction in alcohol consumption among the interlock users. This, combined with the high rate of compliance with the regulations, probably accounts for the fact that there was no case of recidivism during the program. Preliminary findings also suggest a reduction in the annual accident rate for interlock users while in the program. It still is too early to draw any conclusions concerning the rate of recidivism after completion of the program due to an insufficient amount of data for analysis. Nevertheless, the preliminary results are so promising that the program will now be expanded to cover all of Sweden as well as to include all driver's license categories.
PubMed ID
16210194 View in PubMed
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Ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis: part of a common spectrum or distinct diseases?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106355
Source
J Rheumatol. 2013 Dec;40(12):2038-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Dinny Wallis
Nigil Haroon
Renise Ayearst
Adele Carty
Robert D Inman
Author Affiliation
From the Division of Rheumatology, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2013 Dec;40(12):2038-41
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Reaction - metabolism
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Biological Markers - metabolism
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Canada
Cohort Studies
Female
HLA-B27 Antigen - metabolism
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prospective Studies
Spondylarthritis - classification - diagnosis - immunology
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - classification - diagnosis - immunology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the features of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) in a Canadian cohort of 639 patients with AS and 73 patients with nr-axSpA.
Clinical and laboratory data were compared for patients with AS and nr-axSpA enrolled in a longitudinal SpA cohort.
The proportion of male patients was higher in AS than in nr-axSpA (76.2% vs 47.9%; p
PubMed ID
24187102 View in PubMed
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Anti-inflammatory effect of high-dose insulin treatment after urgent coronary revascularization surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81007
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2006 Sep;50(8):962-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Koskenkari J K
Kaukoranta P K
Rimpiläinen J.
Vainionpää V.
Ohtonen P P
Surcel H-M
Juvonen T.
Ala-Kokko T I
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Intensive Care, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. juha.koskenkari@fimnet.fi
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2006 Sep;50(8):962-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angina, Unstable - surgery
Biological Markers - metabolism
Blood Glucose - metabolism
C-Reactive Protein - drug effects
Cardioplegic Solutions - administration & dosage
Emergency Treatment
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - metabolism
Female
Glucose - administration & dosage
Humans
Inflammation - prevention & control
Insulin - administration & dosage
Interleukin-10 - metabolism
Interleukin-6 - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Reperfusion Injury - prevention & control
Myocardial Revascularization - methods
Potassium - administration & dosage
Prospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The administration of insulin has been shown to exert cardioprotective and immunomodulatory properties. Ischemia and inflammation are typical features of acute coronary syndrome, thus it was hypothesized that high-dose glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) treatment could suppress the systemic inflammatory reaction and attenuate myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in patients with unstable angina pectoris after urgent coronary artery bypass surgery. METHODS: Forty patients with unstable angina pectoris scheduled for urgent coronary artery bypass surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass were randomly assigned to receive either high-dose insulin treatment (short-acting insulin 1 IU/kg/h with 30% glucose 1.5 ml/kg/h administered separately) or control treatment (saline). Blood glucose levels were targeted to 6.0-8.0 mmol/l in both groups by adjusting the rate of glucose infusion in the GIK group and by additional insulin in the control group as needed. RESULTS: High-dose insulin treatment was associated with significantly lower average C-reactive protein (23.8 vs. 40.1 mg/l, P= 0.008) and free fatty acid levels (0.22 vs. 0.41 mmol/l, P=
PubMed ID
16923091 View in PubMed
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Are early growth and nutrition related to bone health in adolescence? The Copenhagen Cohort Study of infant nutrition and growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132068
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6 Suppl):1865S-1869S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Christian Mølgaard
Anni Larnkjær
Alicja Budek Mark
Kim F Michaelsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. cm@life.ku.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Dec;94(6 Suppl):1865S-1869S
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Anthropometry
Biological Markers - metabolism
Body Height
Body Weight
Bone Density
Bone Development - physiology
Breast Feeding
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant Formula - administration & dosage
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism
Male
Nutritional Status
Osteocalcin - blood
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Abstract
It is generally accepted that peak bone mass affects later fracture risk in the elderly. The extent to which early nutrition and growth can program later bone health has been examined in only a few studies. In the Copenhagen Cohort Study we showed that breastfed infants had significantly higher serum (s)-osteocalcin concentration than did formula-fed infants.
We investigated whether early nutrition and early growth are associated with later bone mass in adolescence.
Participants were examined at birth; at ages 2, 6, and 9 mo (n = 143); and at age 17 y (n = 109) with anthropometric and s-osteocalcin measures and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning (age 17 y only). Total body (T) and lumbar spine (LS) DXA values were used.
The duration of exclusive breastfeeding was positively correlated with the sex-adjusted LS bone mineral content (BMC), LS bone area (BA), and LS bone mineral density (BMD) (all P
PubMed ID
21849602 View in PubMed
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132 records – page 1 of 14.