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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography for suspected recurrent papillary thyroid cancer: early experience at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153281
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):712-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Max Dahele
Yee C Ung
Lisa Ehrlich
Jay Silverberg
Judith Balogh
C Shun Wong
Author Affiliation
Departmentof Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Edmond Odette Cancer Centre,Toronto, Ontario.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):712-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cancer Care Facilities
Carcinoma, Papillary - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Thyroglobulin - blood
Thyroid Neoplasms - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Thyroidectomy - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To report the initial experience with combined 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging for suspected recurrent papillary differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (SHSC), Toronto.
Single institution retrospective study.
Consecutive patients from SHSC who underwent FDG PET/CT imaging for suspected recurrent DTC over a period of 2.5 years were identified and their charts reviewed.
Qualitative appraisal of FDG PET/CT imaging in suspected recurrent DTC.
Sixteen patients (14F, 2M) were identified accounting for 17 FDG PET/CT scans. Three scans (18%) in 3 different patients were reported as suspicious for recurrent disease in the neck (1-3 lesions) and were considered "positive". All were subsequently confirmed pathologically (4-13 positive lymph nodes post operatively). Prior conventional imaging was abnormal in two patients. Two patients had an elevated non-stimulated thyroglobulin (TG)
PubMed ID
19128681 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population with 18,791 participants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117634
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):423-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
P. Brøndum-Jacobsen
M. Benn
A. Tybjaerg-Hansen
B G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):423-31
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark
Down-Regulation
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seasons
Time Factors
Venous Thromboembolism - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Vitamin D has potential antithrombotic effects, suggesting that vitamin D analogs could be used as adjunctive antithrombotic agents. However, epidemiologic evidence of an association between reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and the risk of venous thromboembolism is lacking.
To test the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population.
We prospectively studied 18 791 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study and the Copenhagen General Population Study. During up to 30 years of follow-up, 950 participants were diagnosed with venous thromboembolism. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were adjusted for seasonal variation.
The cumulative incidence of venous thromboembolism as a function of age increased with decreasing tertiles of seasonally adjusted plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (log-rank trend: P = 4 × 10(-4) ). On comparison of participants in the lowest and the highest tertile of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, the crude risk estimate in a model adjusted for age and sex was a 37% (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-64%) increased risk of venous thromboembolism. The corresponding risk increase in a model adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking and cancer was 26% (95% CI 5-51%), and in a multivariable-adjusted model also including physical activity, hormone replacement therapy, menopausal status, oral contraception use and lipid-lowering therapy it was 28% (95% CI 6-53%). Furthermore, corresponding risk increases with attempts to correct for regression dilution bias were 103% (95% CI 37-202%), 70% (95% CI 14-155%) and 73% (95% CI 15-160%) in the three models, respectively.
In these large general population studies, we observed a stepwise increasing risk of venous thromboembolism with decreasing tertiles of seasonally adjusted plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations.
PubMed ID
23279309 View in PubMed
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25-hydroxyvitamin d levels and risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death: population-based study and meta-analyses of 18 and 17 studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121124
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Nov;32(11):2794-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Peter Brøndum-Jacobsen
Marianne Benn
Gorm B Jensen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Nov;32(11):2794-802
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D associates with increased risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death.
We measured baseline plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10 170 women and men from the Danish general population without vitamin D-fortified food. During 29 years of follow-up, 3100 persons developed ischemic heart disease, 1625 myocardial infarction, and 6747 died. Decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were associated with increasing risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories (P for trend, 2×10(-4)-3×10(-53)). Comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at the 1st to 4th percentile with individuals with levels at the 50th to 100th percentile, the multivariable adjusted risk was increased by 40% (95% CI, 14%-72%) for ischemic heart disease, by 64% (25%-114%) for myocardial infarction, by 57% (38%-78%) for early death, and by 81% (40%-135%) for fatal ischemic heart disease/myocardial infarction. In the meta-analyses of 18 and 17 studies, risk of ischemic heart disease and early death were increased by 39% (25%-54%) and 46% (31%-64%) for lowest versus highest quartile of 25-hydroxyvitamin D level.
We observed increasing risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death with decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. These findings were substantiated in meta-analyses.
PubMed ID
22936341 View in PubMed
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A 52-week prospective, cohort study of the effects of losartan with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145472
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
N. Racine
P. Hamet
J S Sampalis
N. Longo
N. Bastien
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - chemically induced
Diuretics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hydrochlorothiazide - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hypertension - blood - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Linear Models
Losartan - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - complications - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The impact of an ARB, with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), on glycaemic factors and the risk for developing diabetes in hypertensive patients with the metabolic syndrome have not been fully assessed. This was a 52-week multicentre, prospective, phase-IV, open-label, cohort study of losartan or losartan/HCTZ in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome. All subjects were treated initially with losartan 50?mg?day(-1). Those not achieving target blood pressure (BP
PubMed ID
20147971 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury assessed by cystatin C after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and late renal dysfunction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267312
Source
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2014 Aug;28(4):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Malin Johansson
Shahab Nozohoor
Henrik Bjursten
Per Ola Kimblad
Johan Sjögren
Source
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2014 Aug;28(4):960-5
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - surgery
Biological Markers - blood
Creatinine - blood
Cystatin C - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Kidney - physiopathology
Male
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement - adverse effects
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate acute kidney injury (AKI) with cystatin C following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and to assess the impact of postoperative AKI on outcome and late renal function.
A prospective study.
Single, tertiary referral center.
Sixty-eight consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis and advanced comorbidity.
Blood samples were collected on 4 occasions pre- and postoperatively to determine levels of s-creatinine and cystatin C. Additionally, a sample was collected at followup 12 months postoperatively for the determination of s-creatinine.
The mean preoperative eGFR (s-creatinine) was 67±24 mL/min/1.73 m² compared to 45±21 mL/min/1.73 m² with eGFR (cystatin C) (p
PubMed ID
24315756 View in PubMed
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Additive effects of soluble TWEAK and inflammation on mortality in hemodialysis patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91537
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009 Jan;4(1):110-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Carrero Juan J
Ortiz Alberto
Qureshi Abdul R
Martín-Ventura Jose L
Bárány Peter
Heimbürger Olof
Marrón Belén
Metry George
Snaedal Sunna
Lindholm Bengt
Egido Jesús
Stenvinkel Peter
Blanco-Colio Luis M
Author Affiliation
Division of Renal Medicine and Baxter Novum, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009 Jan;4(1):110-8
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - etiology - mortality
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - etiology - mortality
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Interleukin-6 - blood
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Kidney Diseases - blood - complications - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Renal Dialysis - mortality
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Tumor Necrosis Factors - blood
Up-Regulation
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by an exceptionally high mortality rate, primarily due to cardiovascular disease. Reduced soluble TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK) plasma levels have been reported both in patients with subclinical atherosclerosis and CKD. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 218 prevalent patients (121 men; 63 +/- 14 yr) undergoing hemodialysis (HD). sTWEAK levels in relation with the patients' outcome were studied. RESULTS: sTWEAK plasma levels were 208 [(165 to 272) pg/ml, median interquartile range], significantly lower than healthy controls (P 7.0 pg/ml), in whom high sTWEAK strongly predicted cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These results were confirmed in a second cohort of HD patients. CONCLUSIONS: The concurrent presence of elevated sTWEAK plasma concentrations and an inflammatory environment have additive effects on mortality in HD patients. Further studies on the potential different role of sTWEAK in health and disease are warranted.
PubMed ID
18945991 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267651
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Mar;22(3):276-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Søren Lindberg
Jan Skov Jensen
Mette Bjerre
Sune H Pedersen
Jan Frystyk
Allan Flyvbjerg
Søren Galatius
Jørgen Jeppesen
Rasmus Mogelvang
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Mar;22(3):276-83
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - diagnosis - mortality - prevention & control
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Protective factors
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Up-Regulation
Young Adult
Abstract
Adiponectin is viewed as an insulin-sensitizing hormone with anti-inflammatory effects. In accordance, plasma adiponectin is decreased in metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, in spite of the apparently beneficially effects, recent data from large prospective studies have consistently linked high adiponectin levels with increased cardiovascular (CV) disease and mortality, thus questioning the positive view on adiponectin. Accordingly, we investigated the relationship between adiponectin, incident T2DM and subsequently CV events.
We prospectively followed 5349 randomly selected men and women from the community, without T2DM or CV disease. Plasma adiponectin was measured at study entry. Median follow-up time was 8.5 years (IQR 8.0-9.1 years). During follow up, 136 participants developed T2DM. Following their diagnosis, 36 of the 136 participants experienced a CV event (myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke, or CV death).
Participants with increasing adiponectin had reduced risk of developing T2DM (p?
PubMed ID
24265290 View in PubMed
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Admission interleukin-6 is associated with post resuscitation organ dysfunction and predicts long-term neurological outcome after out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265459
Source
Resuscitation. 2014 Nov;85(11):1573-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Jukka Vaahersalo
Markus B Skrifvars
Kari Pulkki
Mats Stridsberg
Helge Røsjø
Seppo Hovilehto
Marjaana Tiainen
Tero Varpula
Ville Pettilä
Esko Ruokonen
Source
Resuscitation. 2014 Nov;85(11):1573-9
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Female
Finland
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Interleukin-6 - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Organ Failure - blood - mortality
Multivariate Analysis
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - blood - mortality - therapy
Patient Admission
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
S100 Proteins - analysis
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Fibrillation - blood - mortality - therapy
Abstract
To study plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and S-100B during intensive care after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest from ventricular fibrillation (OHCA-VF), and their associations with the duration of ischemia, organ dysfunction and long-term neurological outcome.
A 12-month prospective observational multicentre study was conducted in 21 Finnish intensive care units in 2011. IL-6, hs-CRP and S-100B were measured at 0-6 h, 24 h, 48 h and 96 h after ICU admission. Associations with the time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores divided into tertiles and 12-month cerebral performance category (CPC) were tested.
Of 186 OHCA-VF patients included in the study, 110 (59.1%) patients survived with good neurological outcome (CPC 1-2) 12 months after cardiac arrest. Admission plasma concentrations of IL-6 but not hs-CRP were higher with prolonged time to ROSC (p
PubMed ID
25238742 View in PubMed
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The adverse long-term impact of renal impairment in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the drug-eluting stent era.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146521
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Aug;2(4):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Clare E Appleby
Joan Ivanov
Shahar Lavi
Karen Mackie
Eric M Horlick
Douglas Ing
Christopher B Overgaard
Peter H Seidelin
Rüdiger von Harsdorf
Vladimír Dzavík
Author Affiliation
Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Aug;2(4):309-16
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - instrumentation
Biological Markers - blood
Chronic Disease
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - complications - mortality - radiography - therapy
Creatinine - blood
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Heart Diseases - etiology - mortality
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Kidney Diseases - blood - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
An observational study determining the long-term impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary cardiac referral center. CKD is associated with poor in-hospital outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention, but its effect beyond 1 year, particularly in the drug-eluting stent (DES) era, has not been reported.
Baseline creatinine was available for 11,953 patients entered into a prospective registry (April 2000 to September 2007). Patients were stratified: those with or without at least moderate CKD (creatinine clearance,
PubMed ID
20031733 View in PubMed
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236 records – page 1 of 24.