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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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Acute kidney injury assessed by cystatin C after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and late renal dysfunction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267312
Source
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2014 Aug;28(4):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Malin Johansson
Shahab Nozohoor
Henrik Bjursten
Per Ola Kimblad
Johan Sjögren
Source
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2014 Aug;28(4):960-5
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - surgery
Biological Markers - blood
Creatinine - blood
Cystatin C - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Kidney - physiopathology
Male
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement - adverse effects
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate acute kidney injury (AKI) with cystatin C following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and to assess the impact of postoperative AKI on outcome and late renal function.
A prospective study.
Single, tertiary referral center.
Sixty-eight consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis and advanced comorbidity.
Blood samples were collected on 4 occasions pre- and postoperatively to determine levels of s-creatinine and cystatin C. Additionally, a sample was collected at followup 12 months postoperatively for the determination of s-creatinine.
The mean preoperative eGFR (s-creatinine) was 67±24 mL/min/1.73 m² compared to 45±21 mL/min/1.73 m² with eGFR (cystatin C) (p
PubMed ID
24315756 View in PubMed
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[Acute myocardial infarction in Bodø over a period of 15 years]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77423
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Jun 14;127(12):1631-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2007
Author
Hovland Anders
Bjørnstad Hanne
Strømsnes Oddgeir
Waage-Nielsen Erik
Sexton Joe
Author Affiliation
Kardiologisk seksjon, Medisinsk avdeling, Nordlandssykehuset, 8092 Bodø. a-hovlan@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Jun 14;127(12):1631-3
Date
Jun-14-2007
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Troponin - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Studies show that both incidence and mortality in acute myocardial infarction are declining. It was expected that introduction of the troponin biomarkers in 2000 would lead to an increase in the number of diagnosed myocardial infarctions. We aimed at establishing how introduction of troponin and the fact that elderly comprise an increasing part of the population with an inherent increased risk for myocardial infarction, affected myocardial infarctions in our region with respect to incidence, age distribution and mortality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All patients admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (ICD 9 and 10) from 1990 to 2005 were included in the study. Data were imported from our electronic journal system with a database tool (Qlikview). Information about the incidence of myocardial infarction in all of Norway was taken from The Norwegian Inpatient Registry and population data were taken from Statistics Norway. Data were transferred from Qlikview to Excel and SPSS for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The incidence of myocardial infarction varied from year to year in our hospital area; it increased from 2000, but then decreased during the last two years. The proportion of patients aged 80 and older increased from 13 to 36% (p
PubMed ID
17571099 View in PubMed
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[Acute myocardial infarctions in Norway 2001 - 2007]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97214
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Apr 22;130(8):820-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-22-2010
Author
Terje P Hagen
Kjartan Sarheim Anthun
Asmund Reikvam
Author Affiliation
Institutt for helseledelse og helseøkonomi, Det medisinske fakultet, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1089 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway. t.p.hagen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Apr 22;130(8):820-4
Date
Apr-22-2010
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Discharge
Questionnaires
Registries
Troponin - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The objective of the study was to analyse the number of AMI (acute myocardial infarctions) registered in the period 1991 - 2007, with special emphasis on the development after 1999, and with this background discuss changes in incidence. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We analysed data from NPR (the Norwegian Patient Register), on patients discharged from hospitals in the period 1991 - 2007 with the main diagnosis AMI. For the year 2004, a patient-based dataset was made available from SINTEF Health Research/NPR. The time for when troponin assays (for diagnosing AMI) were implemented in Norwegian hospitals was recorded through a questionnaire survey. RESULTS: The number of discharges for these patients decreased during the 90 s. From 2000 to 2007, the total number of discharges increased considerably (from 11,892 to 19,757 [66 %]). In patients below 80 years of age the number of discharges per 100,000 inhabitants was 283 in 1991 and 196 in 1999. After controlling for patient transfers between hospitals and introduction of troponins for diagnosing of AMI, the number of patients below 80 years admitted to hospital in 2004 was estimated to 142 - 162 per 100,000 inhabitants. INTERPRETATION: The trend for a decrease in AMI incidence seems to have continued from the 1990 s to after 2000 for the age groups below 80.
PubMed ID
20418926 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267651
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Mar;22(3):276-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Søren Lindberg
Jan Skov Jensen
Mette Bjerre
Sune H Pedersen
Jan Frystyk
Allan Flyvbjerg
Søren Galatius
Jørgen Jeppesen
Rasmus Mogelvang
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Mar;22(3):276-83
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - diagnosis - mortality - prevention & control
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Protective factors
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Up-Regulation
Young Adult
Abstract
Adiponectin is viewed as an insulin-sensitizing hormone with anti-inflammatory effects. In accordance, plasma adiponectin is decreased in metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, in spite of the apparently beneficially effects, recent data from large prospective studies have consistently linked high adiponectin levels with increased cardiovascular (CV) disease and mortality, thus questioning the positive view on adiponectin. Accordingly, we investigated the relationship between adiponectin, incident T2DM and subsequently CV events.
We prospectively followed 5349 randomly selected men and women from the community, without T2DM or CV disease. Plasma adiponectin was measured at study entry. Median follow-up time was 8.5 years (IQR 8.0-9.1 years). During follow up, 136 participants developed T2DM. Following their diagnosis, 36 of the 136 participants experienced a CV event (myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke, or CV death).
Participants with increasing adiponectin had reduced risk of developing T2DM (p?
PubMed ID
24265290 View in PubMed
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The adverse long-term impact of renal impairment in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the drug-eluting stent era.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146521
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Aug;2(4):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Clare E Appleby
Joan Ivanov
Shahar Lavi
Karen Mackie
Eric M Horlick
Douglas Ing
Christopher B Overgaard
Peter H Seidelin
Rüdiger von Harsdorf
Vladimír Dzavík
Author Affiliation
Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Aug;2(4):309-16
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - instrumentation
Biological Markers - blood
Chronic Disease
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - complications - mortality - radiography - therapy
Creatinine - blood
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Heart Diseases - etiology - mortality
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Kidney Diseases - blood - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
An observational study determining the long-term impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary cardiac referral center. CKD is associated with poor in-hospital outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention, but its effect beyond 1 year, particularly in the drug-eluting stent (DES) era, has not been reported.
Baseline creatinine was available for 11,953 patients entered into a prospective registry (April 2000 to September 2007). Patients were stratified: those with or without at least moderate CKD (creatinine clearance,
PubMed ID
20031733 View in PubMed
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Age and gender differences in the association between Nt-proBNP and glucometabolic disturbances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134279
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2011 Oct;45(5):294-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Margret Leosdottir
Ronnie Willenheimer
Christian Hall
Solve Tjora
Johan Malm
Olle Melander
Peter M Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. Margret.Leosdottir@med.lu.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2011 Oct;45(5):294-300
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fasting - blood
Female
Glucose Metabolism Disorders - blood - diagnosis
Heart Diseases - blood - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Predictive value of tests
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Glucometabolic disturbances are associated with myocardial dysfunction. Brain natriuretic peptides (BNP) are used for detecting myocardial dysfunction in clinical practice. However, studies on elderly subjects and gender-specific analyses are sparse.
We examined cross-sectional associations between Nt-proBNP and 1) fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and 2) categories of glucometabolic disturbances, in middle-aged and older subjects (1266 men, 526 women), applying multivariate linear regression analysis.
FPG was positively correlated with Nt-proBNP among middle-aged men (p = 0.04) and negatively albeit non-significantly (p = 0.1) among middle-aged women. Weaker non-significant correlations were seen among older subjects. Middle-aged men with new-onset and prevalent diabetes had higher Nt-proBNP than the reference group (FPG =5.0 mmol/L): 9.53 (p = 0.002) and 8.23 (p = 0.02) vs. 5.71 pmol/L. No differences in Nt-proBNP between categories of glucometabolic disturbance were observed among older men or women.
The results indicate an age- and gender difference in the ability of Nt-proBNP to identify myocardial dysfunction in relation to glucometabolic disturbances. Therefore, Nt-proBNP should be used with caution as a general surrogate marker for myocardial dysfunction in this setting.
PubMed ID
21604967 View in PubMed
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Anaemia and thrombocytopenia in patients with prostate cancer and bone metastases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99360
Source
BMC Cancer. 2010;10:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Carsten Nieder
Ellinor Haukland
Adam Pawinski
Astrid Dalhaug
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine - Division of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital, Bodø, Norway. cnied@hotmail.com
Source
BMC Cancer. 2010;10:284
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - blood - etiology - mortality - therapy
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Bone Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - mortality - secondary
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Taxoids - therapeutic use
Thrombocytopenia - blood - etiology - mortality - therapy
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, risk factors and prognostic impact of anaemia and thrombocytopenia in patients with bone metastases (BM) from prostate cancer. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study including 51 consecutive patients treated at a community hospital. Twenty-nine patients (57%) received taxotere after diagnosis of BM. RESULTS: Haemoglobin (Hb)
PubMed ID
20540802 View in PubMed
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Angiographically-assessed coronary artery disease associates with HDL particle size in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123466
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug;223(2):359-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Patricia Blackburn
Isabelle Lemieux
Benoît Lamarche
Jean Bergeron
Patrice Perron
Gérald Tremblay
Daniel Gaudet
Jean-Pierre Després
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Québec (Québec), Canada.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug;223(2):359-64
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - radiography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electrophoresis
Female
Humans
Hypertriglyceridemia - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Logistic Models
Metabolic Syndrome X - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Particle Size
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Waist Circumference
Abstract
It has been suggested that a reduced HDL particle size could be another feature of the atherogenic dyslipidemia found among viscerally obese subjects.
To investigate, in women, the relationship between HDL particle size and coronary artery disease (CAD).
Average HDL particle size was measured in a sample of 239 women on whom CAD was assessed by angiography.
Overall, women who had CAD were characterized by a deteriorated fasting metabolic risk profile, which was accompanied by smaller HDL particles compared to women without CAD (80.4???2.2?? vs. 81.5???2.7??, p?
PubMed ID
22695528 View in PubMed
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An indoor air filtration study in homes of elderly: cardiovascular and respiratory effects of exposure to particulate matter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261646
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12:116
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Dorina Gabriela Karottki
Michal Spilak
Marie Frederiksen
Lars Gunnarsen
Elvira Vaclavik Brauner
Barbara Kolarik
Zorana Jovanovic Andersen
Torben Sigsgaard
Lars Barregard
Bo Strandberg
Gerd Sallsten
Peter Møller
Steffen Loft
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12:116
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena - drug effects
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cities
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Female
Filtration
Hematologic Tests
Humans
Inflammation - blood - etiology
Intervention Studies
Lung - drug effects - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Particulate Matter - analysis - toxicity
Respiratory Function Tests
Abstract
Exposure to particulate air pollution increases respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly, possibly through inflammation and vascular dysfunction.
We examined potential beneficial effects of indoor air filtration in the homes of elderly, including people taking vasoactive drugs.Forty-eight nonsmoking subjects (51 to 81 years) in 27 homes were included in this randomized, double-blind, crossover intervention study with consecutive two-week periods with or without the inclusion of a high-efficiency particle air filter in re-circulating custom built units in their living room and bedroom. We measured blood pressure, microvascular and lung function and collected blood samples for hematological, inflammation, monocyte surface and lung cell damage markers before and at day 2, 7 and 14 during each exposure scenario.
The particle filters reduced the median concentration of PM2.5 from approximately 8 to 4 µg/m3 and the particle number concentration from 7669 to 5352 particles/cm3. No statistically significant effects of filtration as category were observed on microvascular and lung function or the biomarkers of systemic inflammation among all subjects, or in the subgroups taking (n = 11) or not taking vasoactive drugs (n = 37). However, the filtration efficacy was variable and microvascular function was within 2 days significantly increased with the actual PM2.5 decrease in the bedroom, especially among 25 subjects not taking any drugs.
Substantial exposure contrasts in the bedroom and no confounding by drugs appear required for improved microvascular function by air filtration, whereas no other beneficial effect was found in this elderly population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24373585 View in PubMed
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232 records – page 1 of 24.