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1530 records – page 1 of 153.

[The effect of seasonal biorhythms on the clinical course of hepatitis B]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56806
Source
Lik Sprava. 1995 Jan-Feb;(1-2):79-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
O M Zinchuk
Source
Lik Sprava. 1995 Jan-Feb;(1-2):79-81
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Comparative Study
Hepatitis B - blood
Humans
Seasons
PubMed ID
7483555 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Sheehan's syndrome - case report and review]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97079
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 May;96(5):348-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Hallgerdur Lind Kristjánsdóttir
Sigrún Perla Bödvarsdóttir
Helga Agústa Sigurjónsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Lyflaeknissidi.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 May;96(5):348-52
Date
May-2010
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood - deficiency
Hypopituitarism - blood - diagnosis
Abstract
Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is a pituitary failure after delivery. Symptoms depend on which hormonal axis are affected, failure to lactate and resume menstruation is most frequent but cortisol deficiency is most dangerous and may lead to death if undiagnosed. We present a 38 year old female that was diagnosed with SS after repeated visits to health care professionals with typical symptoms of SS. The purpose of this case report is to draw attention to SS and the symptoms of cortisol deficiency.
PubMed ID
20445222 View in PubMed
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[Biological markers for the intake of fruit and vegetables].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200175
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Sep 30;119(23):3421-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1999
Author
L F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Institutt for ernaeringsforskning, Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Sep 30;119(23):3421-6
Date
Sep-30-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Carotenoids - blood
Diet Surveys
Eating
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Norway
Vegetables
Abstract
No available dietary assessment method is without error in measuring dietary intake. This has led to an increased interest in biological markers of dietary intake. This article is a review of the literature investigating whether the concentration of carotenoids in blood can serve as biological markers for the intake of fruit and vegetables. The literature indicates an association between intake of fruit and vegetables and the concentration of total carotenoids, alfa-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein and beta-cryptoxanthin in plasma. The same association was not observed for plasma lycopene. Results from several studies also indicate that plasma alfa-carotene and plasma total carotenoids are more suitable as biological markers of the intake of fruit and vegetables than the other carotenoids. As there are large individual variations in the plasma carotenoid response after intake, carotenoids in blood will be a better marker of intake at group level than individual level. Furthermore, the average value from several measurements of carotenoids in blood will be a better marker of long-term intake than a single measurement. Several factors in addition to fruit and vegetables influence the concentration of carotenoids in blood. It is important to assess these factors when carotenoids in blood are used as biological markers of the intake of fruit and vegetables.
PubMed ID
10553339 View in PubMed
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[National harmonization of the alcohol biomarker PEth].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106104
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 Sep 25-Oct 8;110(39-40):1747-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anders Helander
Therese Hansson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Universitetslaboratoriet Huddinge, Stockholm. anders.helander@ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 Sep 25-Oct 8;110(39-40):1747-8
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Glycerophospholipids - blood
Humans
Mass Spectrometry - methods - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
24245431 View in PubMed
Less detail

Towards worldwide standardisation of HbA1c determination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47205
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jul;47(7):1143-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
K. Miedema
Author Affiliation
IFCC Working Group on HbA1c Standardisation, Isala Klinieken, Location Weezenlanden, Groot Wezenland 20, 8011 JW, Zwolle, The Netherlands. k.miedema@isala.nl
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jul;47(7):1143-8
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Comparative Study
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis - standards
Humans
Laboratories
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Haemoglobin A(1)c (HbA(1)c) or glycohaemoglobin is one of the most important parameters in the management of patients with diabetes mellitus, but to date there is no international standard for determining HbA(1)c. Most of the routine HbA(1)c assays are standardised against one of the local standardisation schemes like the NGSP (USA) and other schemes (Japan, Sweden). Still, results of HbA(1)c tests diverge considerably, as do the accompanying clinical decision limits.The IFCC Working Group on HbA(1)c Standardisation has developed a reference method and also set up a reference system for HbA(1)c, in which the analyte is defined as beta-N-glycated haemoglobin. This reference system consists of a network of reference laboratories that uses the reference methods and certified reference materials for optimal measurement of HbA(1)c in human blood. The main task of the network is to assign values to secondary reference materials, to be used by manufacturers of routine HbA(1)c assays to calibrate their assays. The high specificity of the reference method results in lower HbA(1)c values in blood samples, since the unspecific components falsely identified as HbA(1)c in routine methods are not measured by the reference method. The reference range for the new reference method was determined as 3 to 4% and the clinical decision limits were translated from existing guidelines: goal of treatment 5% HbA(1)c, change of therapy advised at HbA(1)c greater than 6%. Despite these lower values, worldwide implementation of the IFCC reference system for HbA(1)c is recommended, in order to end the great divergence in HbA(1)c results, with which physicians and patients are confronted today.
PubMed ID
15249996 View in PubMed
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Regional variation in use of exogenous and endogenous glomerular filtration rate (GFR) markers in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126315
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2012 Aug;117(3):273-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Susanne Vilhelmsdotter Allander
Lars-Åke Marké
Björn Wihlen
Maria Svensson
Carl-Gustaf Elinder
Anders Larsson
Author Affiliation
SBU, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2012 Aug;117(3):273-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Creatinine - blood
Cystatin C - blood
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
Markers of renal function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR)) are frequently used in the Swedish health care. GFR is usually estimated based on plasma creatinine concentration, but plasma cystatin C concentration, creatinine clearance, iohexol clearance, and (51)Cr-EDTA clearance are also used. These markers are all part of the daily patient care, but there is little specific information on the clinical use of these markers. The aim of this study was to compare the use of these various GFR markers in different parts of Sweden and potential changes over time.
Retrospective study using questionnaires to collect information for the years 2006-2009 divided per county on the specific use of GFR markers with type of test reports.
Plasma/serum creatinine concentration (96%) is by far the dominating GFR marker in Sweden, while cystatin C concentration (3.5%), creatinine clearance (0.1%), iohexol clearance (0.1%), and 51Cr-EDTA clearance (0.1%) are less frequently used. The use of GFR markers, including creatinine, continues to increase on a national level with the exception of creatinine clearance and 51Cr-EDTA clearance. There were considerable variations between different counties in the use of GFR markers and the type of test reports that the laboratories provided.
The inter-county variations of GFR markers used in Sweden are large and indicate that savings associated with optimized test utilization in this regard could be substantial. Regional habits and traditions are likely to influence the variations in GFR marker use.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22401136 View in PubMed
Less detail

Heritabilities for fifteen routine biochemical values: findings in 215 Swedish twin pairs 82 years of age or older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95278
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2009;69(5):562-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Nilsson Sven E
Read Sanna
Berg Stig
Johansson Boo
Author Affiliation
Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jonkoping University, Sweden. sven.nilsson@hhj.hj.se
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2009;69(5):562-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Female
Humans
Inheritance Patterns - genetics
Male
Sweden
Twins - genetics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to calculate the overall heritability of some routine biochemical analyses. Furthermore, as genetic and environmental influences might differ across various segments, genetic impact in the highest and lowest thirds of the distributions was estimated. METHODS: Ninety-six monozygotic and 120 dizygotic same-sex twin pairs aged 82 and older were tested. Structural equation modelling was used to estimate the genetic and environmental influences on serum levels of albumin, calcium, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, GGT, potassium, sodium, creatinine, urea, urate, cobalamin, folate, homocysteine, free thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). RESULTS: Additive genetic influence of between 66% and 28% of the variance was accounted for all values except creatinine, for which the genetic influence was marginal. The highest influence was found for homocysteine, cobalamin, folate and HDL-cholesterol. Genetic influence for the tests was mainly in congruence with previous findings in younger samples. When limited to the highest and lowest thirds of distribution, there were substantial differences in the proportion of genetic influence for some tests. CONCLUSION: For the majority of biochemical tests, the magnitude of genetic influence is considerable. Heritability estimates, however, should be considered in a broad context, with age, gender, morbidity and medication taken into account. Notably, for many test values, the genetic impact may differ considerably between the highest and the lowest range of the distribution.
PubMed ID
19343610 View in PubMed
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Pediatric reference intervals - the Swedish experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260663
Source
Clin Biochem. 2014 Jun;47(9):740-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014

Relationships between trace element concentrations in human blood and serum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188878
Source
Toxicol Lett. 2002 Aug 5;134(1-3):177-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-5-2002
Author
Ebba Bárány
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Lars-Eric Bratteby
Thomas Lundh
Gösta Samuelson
Andrejs Schütz
Staffan Skerfving
Agneta Oskarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, BMC, P.O. Box 573, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden. ebba.barany@farmtox.slu.se
Source
Toxicol Lett. 2002 Aug 5;134(1-3):177-84
Date
Aug-5-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Biological Markers - blood
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry - methods
Sweden
Trace Elements - blood
Abstract
Trace element interactions can affect the absorption, metabolism, or effects of elements. Also, different elements may derive from the same source. Associations in biological media between element concentrations may indicate such phenomena. A large number of correlations were found between 13 trace elements (Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Rh, Pd, Cd, W, Pt, Hg, Tl, and Pb) in human blood and/or serum, as investigated in 372 Swedish adolescents. Notably, serum Se correlated with blood Pb and blood Hg and Cu and Zn were correlated to each other in both blood and serum. The elements Pt, Pd and Rh, spread in the environment through use of catalytic converters in cars, were closely correlated in both blood and serum. Apart from the correlations with a probable biological or exposure-related explanation, several other correlations, of yet unknown importance and origin, were found.
PubMed ID
12191876 View in PubMed
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[Macro creatine kinase as a pitfall in diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54010
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Oct 30;162(44):5930-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2000
Author
R V Laursen
S R Kristensen
K. Angelo-Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk afdeling, Sygehus Fyn Nyborg.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Oct 30;162(44):5930-1
Date
Oct-30-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Creatine Kinase - blood
Diagnosis, Differential
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - enzymology
Abstract
Measurement of creatine kinase and the more heart-specific creatine kinase B has been a mainstay in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in Denmark since the 1970's. However, an elevated creatine kinase B may reflect other conditions than myocardial damage, for example the presence of other isoenzymes or macro creatine kinase. A case is presented with a review of the literature.
PubMed ID
11094555 View in PubMed
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1530 records – page 1 of 153.