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250 records – page 1 of 25.

ACE gene polymorphism explains 30-40% of variability in serum ACE activity in both women and men in the population at large: the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199818
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1999 Dec;147(2):425-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999

Adipose tissue fatty acids as biomarkers of dietary exposure in Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24046
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 May;57(5):629-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
E. Thorling
M. Ewertz
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 May;57(5):629-33
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Adipose tissue fatty acids, it has been proposed, reflect dietary intake. Using data from a validation study preceding a prospective study on diet, cancer, and health in Denmark, we were able to compare fatty acid profiles in adipose tissue biopsies from 86 individuals (23 men and 63 women) aged 40-64 y and dietary intake of fatty acids (as percentage of total fat) assessed by two 7-d weighed-diet records or by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Correlation coefficients (Pearson r) between fatty acid concentrations in adipose tissue biopsies (as percentage of total peak area) and dietary intake of fatty acid (percentage of total fat), determined from the diet records for men and women, respectively, were as follows: polyunsaturated fatty acids r = 0.74 and r = 0.46; n - 3 fatty acids of marine origin: eicosapentaenoic acid r = 0.15 and r = 0.61, and docosahexaenoic acid r = 0.47 and r = 0.57. Correlation coefficients obtained by using the food frequency questionnaire were slightly lower for most fatty acids.
PubMed ID
8480677 View in PubMed
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Admission base deficit and lactate levels in Canadian patients with blunt trauma: are they useful markers of mortality?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123467
Source
J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012 Jun;72(6):1532-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jean-Francois Ouellet
Derek J Roberts
Corina Tiruta
Andrew W Kirkpatrick
Michelle Mercado
Vincent Trottier
Elijah Dixon
David V Feliciano
Chad G Ball
Author Affiliation
Regional Trauma Services, Department of Surgery University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012 Jun;72(6):1532-5
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid-Base Imbalance - blood - mortality
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - analysis
Blood Gas Analysis
Cohort Studies
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - methods
Female
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Lactic Acid - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Analysis
Trauma Centers
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - blood - diagnosis - mortality
Abstract
Elevated base deficit (BD) and lactate levels at admission in patients with injury have been shown to be associated with increased mortality. This relationship is undefined in the Canadian experience. The goal of this study was to define the association between arterial blood gas (ABG) values at admission and mortality for Canadians with severe blunt injury.
A retrospective review of 3,000 consecutive adult major trauma admissions (Injury Severity Score, = 12) to a Canadian academic tertiary care referral center was performed. ABG values at the time of arrival were analyzed with respect to associated mortality and length of stay.
A total of 2,269 patients (76%) had complete data available for analysis. After exclusion of patients who sustained a penetrating injury or were admitted for minor falls (ground levels or low height), 445 had an ABG drawn within 2 hours of arrival. Patients who died displayed a higher median lactate (3.6 vs. 2.2, p
PubMed ID
22695417 View in PubMed
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Aldehyde-protein adducts in the liver as a result of ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10666
Source
Front Biosci. 1999 Jun 1;4:D506-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1999
Author
O. Niemelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, University of Oulu, FIN-90220 Oulu, and EP Central Hospital Laboratory, Seinäjoki, Finland. onni.niemela@epshp.fi
Source
Front Biosci. 1999 Jun 1;4:D506-13
Date
Jun-1-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aldehydes - immunology - metabolism
Animals
Biological Markers - analysis - blood
Disease Models, Animal
Ethanol - metabolism
Extracellular Matrix Proteins - metabolism
Humans
Liver - chemistry - metabolism
Liver Diseases - immunology - metabolism
Oxidative Stress
Protein Binding
Proteins - immunology - metabolism
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Swine
Abstract
A number of systems that generate oxygen free radicals and reactive aldehydic species are activated by excessive ethanol consumption. Recent studies from human alcoholics and from experimental animals have indicated that acetaldehyde and aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation, which are generated in such processes, can bind to proteins forming stable adducts. Adduct formation may lead to several adverse consequences, such as interference with protein function, stimulation of fibrogenesis, and induction of immune responses. The presence of protein adducts in the centrilobular region of the liver in alcohol abusers with an early phase of histological liver damage indicates that adduct formation is one of the key events in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. Dietary supplementation with fat and/or iron strikingly increases the amount of aldehyde-derived epitopes in the liver together with promotion of fibrogenesis.
PubMed ID
10352137 View in PubMed
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Alkaline phosphatase activity in human colostrum as a valuable predictive biomarker for lactational mastitis in nursing mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121334
Source
Biomark Med. 2012 Aug;6(4):553-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ljiljana Bjelakovic
Gordana Kocic
Bojko Bjelakovic
Nikola Zivkovic
Dusica Stojanovic
Danka Sokolovic
Ivana Mladenovic-Ciric
Dusan Sokolovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene, Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, University of Nis, Carnojevica street 10, Nis, Serbia. ljilja975@gmail.com
Source
Biomark Med. 2012 Aug;6(4):553-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alkaline Phosphatase - analysis
Biological Markers - analysis
Breast Feeding
Colostrum - enzymology
Female
Humans
Lactation
Mastitis - diagnosis
Mothers
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Abstract
Biochemical investigations have shown that an indigenous milk enzyme - alkaline phosphatase (ALP) - which is detectable in the lactocytes, plays a very important diagnostic role in clinical medicine, since its activity varies in different tissues and serves as a specific indicator of disease states. The purpose of this study was to evaluate ALP activity in human colostrum as a possible early predictive biomarker for lactational mastitis in nursing mothers.
During a period from May to July 2010, a total of 60 healthy nursing mothers were recruited for this study.
The mean level of colostrum ALP activity from the affected breasts was significantly higher when compared with ALP activity from the contralateral asymptomatic as well as 'healthy' breasts (p
PubMed ID
22917156 View in PubMed
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[A methodological scheme for examination of the urban population, by making multilevel assessments of exposure to ambient air pollutants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159936
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Sep-Oct;(5):65-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
L V Khripach
T D Kniazeva
N S Skvortsova
I M Korsunskaia
V M Rozental'
I E Zykova
Iu A Revazova
S M Novikov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Sep-Oct;(5):65-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Biological Markers - analysis
Child
Environmental Illness - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Humans
Pilot Projects
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia - epidemiology
Urban health
Urban Population
Abstract
A novel methodological design comprising multilevel assessments of exposures of examinees to controlled ambient air pollution according to the data of route stations was developed to examine the population of large towns. The design was tested in 4 surveys of Moscow residents (apparently healthy and outpatients with a number of chronic diseases). The findings indicate the fundamental possibility of altering the traditional differential design of biomedical surveys of the population, by introducing more evidence-based regression analyses and dividing the contributions of individual chemicals to the observed changes in health indices.
PubMed ID
18062018 View in PubMed
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An Sp1 binding site polymorphism in the COLIA1 gene predicts osteoporotic fractures in both men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204582
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 1998 Sep;13(9):1384-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
B L Langdahl
S H Ralston
S F Grant
E F Eriksen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Bone and Mineral Research Group, University Department of Endocrinology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 1998 Sep;13(9):1384-9
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - analysis
Bone Density - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Collagen - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Spinal Fractures - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Abstract
Genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, and recent studies have shown that a polymorphic Sp1 binding site in collagen type I alpha1 (COLIA1) gene is associated with bone mass and vertebral fractures in women from the U.K. Information on the predictive value of the COLIA1 Sp1 polymorphism in other populations is limited, however, and no studies have yet been performed in osteoporotic males. In view of this, we analyzed COLIA1 genotypes in relation to bone density and biochemical markers of bone turnover and the presence of osteoporotic fractures in a case-control study of Danish men and women. COLIA1 genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis of genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood samples and related to bone mass, biochemical markers of bone turnover, and the presence of fracture in a study of 375 osteoporotic vertebral fracture patients and normal controls. There was no significant effect of COLIA1 genotype on bone mass or biochemical markers when data from the control group (n = 195) and fracture group (n = 180) were analyzed separately. However, the genotype distribution was significantly different in the fracture cases compared with age-matched controls (chi2 = 16.48, n = 249,p = 0.0003) due mainly to over-representation of the ss genotype in the fracture patients (14.3% vs. 1.4%), equivalent to an odds ratio for vertebral fracture of 11.83 (95% confidence interval 2.64-52.97) in those with the ss genotype. Similar differences in genotype distribution between osteoporotic patients and controls were observed in both men (chi2 = 11.52, n = 95, p = 0.0032, OR = 2.04) and women (chi2 = 6.90, n = 154, p = 0.032, OR = 1.37). In keeping with the above, logistic regression analysis showed that the ss genotype was an independent predictor of osteoporotic fracture (p = 0.028). This study confirms that the COLIA1 Sp1 polymorphism is significantly associated with osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The association is seen in both men and women, and the effect on fracture risk appears to be partly independent of bone mineral density. Our results raise the possibility that genotyping at the Sp1 site could be of clinical value in identifying individuals at risk of osteoporotic fractures in both genders.
PubMed ID
9738510 View in PubMed
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Antibodies to hepatitis B core in Danish blood donors: a surrogate marker for 'high-risk' behaviour?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56634
Source
Vox Sang. 2002 Apr;82(3):161; author reply 161
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
C. Moore
J. Barbara
P. Hewitt
Source
Vox Sang. 2002 Apr;82(3):161; author reply 161
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - analysis
Blood Donors
Denmark
Eligibility Determination
Female
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis
Humans
Male
Prostitution
Risk-Taking
Tattooing
Notes
Comment On: Vox Sang. 1997;72(4):207-109228709
Comment On: Vox Sang. 2001 Nov;81(4):222-711903997
PubMed ID
11952992 View in PubMed
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[Antioxidant protection, metabolites of nitrogen oxide on the forming of oxidative stress in patients with bronchial asthma]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14993
Source
Lik Sprava. 2005 Jul-Sep;(5-6):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
H P Pobed'onna
Source
Lik Sprava. 2005 Jul-Sep;(5-6):36-40
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - metabolism
Asthma - blood - metabolism - physiopathology
Biological Markers - analysis
Breath Tests
Bronchi - physiopathology
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Lipid Peroxidation - physiology
Male
Nitrates - analysis
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Nitrites - analysis
Oxidative Stress
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
276 Patients with bronchial asthma of different degree of severity have been observed. An increase in processes of lipid peroxidation, depression of antioxidant protection, increase in oxide nitrogen metabolites in blood serum and condensate of exhaled air were detected. These pathological changes may be considered as manifestation of system oxidative stress more expressed in bronchi.
PubMed ID
16396289 View in PubMed
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250 records – page 1 of 25.