Skip header and navigation

Refine By

29 records – page 1 of 3.

Airborne fungal and bacterial components in PM1 dust from biofuel plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149575
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2009 Oct;53(7):749-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Anne Mette Madsen
Vivi Schlünssen
Tina Olsen
Torben Sigsgaard
Hediye Avci
Author Affiliation
The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. amm@nrcwe.dk
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2009 Oct;53(7):749-57
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - isolation & purification
Aerosols
Air Microbiology
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Biofuels - microbiology
Denmark
Dust
Fungi - isolation & purification
Humans
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Particle Size
Seasons
Abstract
Fungi grown in pure cultures produce DNA- or RNA-containing particles smaller than spore size ( 3)-beta-D-glucans. In the 29 PM(1) samples, cultivable fungi were found in six samples and with a median concentration below detection level. Using microscopy, fungal spores were identified in 22 samples. The components NAGase and (1 --> 3)-beta-D-glucans, which are mainly associated with fungi, were present in all PM(1) samples. Thermophilic actinomycetes were present in 23 of the 29 PM(1) samples [average = 739 colony-forming units (CFU) m(-3)]. Cultivable and 'total bacteria' were found in average concentrations of, respectively, 249 CFU m(-3) and 1.8 x 10(5) m(-3). DNA- and RNA-containing particles of different lengths were counted by microscopy and revealed a high concentration of particles with a length of 0.5-1.5 microm and only few particles >1.5 microm. The number of cultivable fungi and beta-glucan in the total dust correlated significantly with the number of DNA/RNA-containing particles with lengths of between 1.0 and 1.5 microm, with DNA/RNA-containing particles >1.5 microm, and with other fungal components in PM(1) dust. Airborne beta-glucan and NAGase were found in PM(1) samples where no cultivable fungi were present, and beta-glucan and NAGase were found in higher concentrations per fungal spore in PM(1) dust than in total dust. This indicates that fungal particles smaller than fungal spore size are present in the air at the plants. Furthermore, many bacteria, including actinomycetes, were present in PM(1) dust. Only 0.2% of the bacteria in PM(1) dust were cultivable.
Notes
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2000 Jul;16(1):140-510933100
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2008 Aug;34(4):278-718820821
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2001 Mar;58(3):154-911171927
Cites: Mediators Inflamm. 2001 Feb;10(1):13-911324899
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2001 Aug;45(6):493-811513799
Cites: Mediators Inflamm. 2001 Aug;10(4):173-811577993
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2002 Jul;68(7):3522-3112089037
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2003 Apr;47(3):187-20012639832
Cites: Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):148-5512756008
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2004 Jun;48(4):327-3815191942
Cites: J Appl Bacteriol. 1976 Oct;41(2):315-9791914
Cites: Mycopathologia. 1976 Dec 10;60(1):45-913304
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1978 May;35(5):847-52655701
Cites: Basic Life Sci. 1981;18:19-327271709
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1982 Jul;44(1):179-836751223
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1983 Aug;40(3):325-96871122
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1986 Apr;77(4):635-93958392
Cites: J Appl Bacteriol. 1986 Nov;61(5):401-63804860
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1987 Jun;53(6):1370-53496850
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1990 Aug;51(8):427-362203242
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1990 Nov;86(5):726-312229838
Cites: J Appl Bacteriol. 1992 May;72(5):400-91618718
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1994 Nov;55(11):1055-607992797
Cites: Biochem Mol Biol Int. 1995 Jul;36(4):781-918528140
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1996 Mar;57(3):279-848776199
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Jun;105(6):622-359288497
Cites: Microbios. 1998;93(375):85-1049697338
Cites: Curr Opin Struct Biol. 1998 Oct;8(5):548-579818257
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Jun;107 Suppl 3:501-310346999
Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 1999 May;49(4):237-4110474915
Cites: Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 1999 Sep;14(9):598-60810510522
Cites: Indoor Air. 2005 Jun;15(3):160-915865616
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005 May;115(5):1043-815867864
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 May;78(4):279-8615818503
Cites: Indian J Exp Biol. 2005 Oct;43(10):892-616235723
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2006 Mar;50(2):175-8716354741
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Jul 1;40(13):4226-3216856739
Cites: Ann Agric Environ Med. 2006;13(1):139-4516858899
Cites: Toxicol In Vitro. 2006 Dec;20(8):1522-3116930940
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2006 Oct;32(5):374-8217091205
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2006 Nov;50(8):821-3116857704
Cites: Int J Biol Macromol. 2007 Jan 30;40(2):139-4317161862
Cites: Biochimie. 2007 Mar;89(3):347-5417258376
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2007 Oct;51(7):581-9217905736
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2000 Dec;44(8):561-311108781
PubMed ID
19620231 View in PubMed
Less detail

Algae biomass cultivation in nitrogen rich biogas digestate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272211
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;72(10):1723-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
I. Krustok
J G Diaz
M. Odlare
E. Nehrenheim
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;72(10):1723-9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ammonium Compounds - metabolism
Biofuels
Biomass
Lakes
Metals, Heavy - analysis - metabolism
Microalgae - growth & development - metabolism
Nitrogen - metabolism
Sweden
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
Because microalgae are known for quick biomass growth and nutrient uptake, there has been much interest in their use in research on wastewater treatment methods. While many studies have concentrated on the algal treatment of wastewaters with low to medium ammonium concentrations, there are several liquid waste streams with high ammonium concentrations that microalgae could potentially treat. The aim of this paper was to test ammonium tolerance of the indigenous algae community of Lake Mälaren and to use this mixed consortia of algae to remove nutrients from biogas digestate. Algae from Lake Mälaren were cultivated in Jaworski's Medium containing a range of ammonium concentrations and the resulting algal growth was determined. The algae were able to grow at NH4-N concentrations of up to 200 mg L(-1) after which there was significant inhibition. To test the effectiveness of the lake water algae on the treatment of biogas digestate, different pre-cultivation set-ups and biogas digestate concentrations were tested. It was determined that mixing pre-cultivated suspension algae with 25% of biogas digestate by volume, resulting in an ammonium concentration of around 300 mg L(-1), produced the highest algal growth. The algae were effective in removing 72.8±2.2% of NH4-N and 41.4±41.4% of PO4-P.
PubMed ID
26540532 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of chemical and material contamination in waste wood fuels--A case study ranging over nine years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278428
Source
Waste Manag. 2016 Mar;49:311-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Mar Edo
Erik Björn
Per-Erik Persson
Stina Jansson
Source
Waste Manag. 2016 Mar;49:311-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biofuels - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Environmental pollution - prevention & control
Solid Waste - analysis
Sweden
Waste Management - instrumentation - methods
Wood - analysis
Abstract
The increased demand for waste wood (WW) as fuel in Swedish co-combustion facilities during the last years has increased the import of this material. Each country has different laws governing the use of chemicals and therefore the composition of the fuel will likely change when combining WW from different origins. To cope with this, enhanced knowledge is needed on WW composition and the performance of pre-treatment techniques for reduction of its contaminants. In this study, the chemical and physical characteristics of 500 WW samples collected at a co-combustion facility in Sweden between 2004 and 2013 were investigated to determine the variation of contaminant content over time. Multivariate data analysis was used for the interpretation of the data. The concentrations of all the studied contaminants varied widely between sampling occasions, demonstrating the highly variable composition of WW fuels. The efficiency of sieving as a pre-treatment measure to reduce the levels of contaminants was not sufficient, revealing that sieving should be used in combination with other pre-treatment methods. The results from this case study provide knowledge on waste wood composition that may benefit its management. This knowledge can be applied for selection of the most suitable pre-treatments to obtain high quality sustainable WW fuels.
PubMed ID
26709051 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bioelectrochemical anaerobic sewage treatment technology for Arctic communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297771
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32844-32850
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Boris Tartakovsky
Yehuda Kleiner
Michelle-France Manuel
Author Affiliation
National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Ave, Montreal, QC, H4P 2R2, Canada. Boris.Tartakovsky@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32844-32850
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Biofuels
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Bioreactors - microbiology
Carbon - metabolism
Electrochemical Techniques - instrumentation - methods
Electrolysis
Equipment Design
Methane - biosynthesis
Sewage - chemistry
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - instrumentation - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
This study describes a novel wastewater treatment technology suitable for small remote northern communities. The technology is based on an enhanced biodegradation of organic carbon through a combination of anaerobic methanogenic and microbial electrochemical (bioelectrochemical) degradation processes leading to biomethane production. The microbial electrochemical degradation is achieved in a membraneless flow-through bioanode-biocathode setup operating at an applied voltage below the water electrolysis threshold. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests conducted through a broad range of mesophilic and psychrophilic temperatures (5-23 °C) using synthetic wastewater showed a biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) removal efficiency of 90-97% and an effluent BOD5 concentration as low as 7 mg L-1. An electricity consumption of 0.6 kWh kg-1 of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removed was observed. Low energy consumption coupled with enhanced methane production led to a net positive energy balance in the bioelectrochemical treatment system.
PubMed ID
28105595 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2010 Jan;1185:119-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Barry D Solomon
Author Affiliation
Environmental Policy Program, Department of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931-1295, USA. bdsolomo@mtu.edu
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2010 Jan;1185:119-34
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture - economics - methods
Biofuels - utilization
Conservation of Natural Resources - economics - methods - trends
Ecosystem
Employment - economics - methods - statistics & numerical data
Forestry - economics - methods
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Program Evaluation - economics - methods - trends
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
Interest in liquid biofuels production and use has increased worldwide as part of government policies to address the growing scarcity and riskiness of petroleum use, and, at least in theory, to help mitigate adverse global climate change. The existing biofuels markets are dominated by U.S. ethanol production based on cornstarch, Brazilian ethanol production based on sugarcane, and European biodiesel production based on rapeseed oil. Other promising efforts have included programs to shift toward the production and use of biofuels based on residues and waste materials from the agricultural and forestry sectors, and perennial grasses, such as switchgrass and miscanthus--so-called cellulosic ethanol. This article reviews these efforts and the recent literature in the context of ecological economics and sustainability science. Several common dimensions for sustainable biofuels are discussed: scale (resource assessment, land availability, and land use practices); efficiency (economic and energy); equity (geographic distribution of resources and the "food versus fuel" debate); socio-economic issues; and environmental effects and emissions. Recent proposals have been made for the development of sustainable biofuels criteria, culminating in standards released in Sweden in 2008 and a draft report from the international Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels. These criteria hold promise for accelerating a shift away from unsustainable biofuels based on grain, such as corn, and toward possible sustainable feedstock and production practices that may be able to meet a variety of social, economic, and environmental sustainability criteria.
PubMed ID
20146765 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate regulation, energy provisioning and water purification: Quantifying ecosystem service delivery of bioenergy willow grown on riparian buffer zones using life cycle assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279354
Source
Ambio. 2016 Dec;45(8):872-884
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
David Styles
Pål Börjesson
Tina D'Hertefeldt
Klaus Birkhofer
Jens Dauber
Paul Adams
Sopan Patil
Tim Pagella
Lars B Pettersson
Philip Peck
Céline Vaneeckhaute
Håkan Rosenqvist
Source
Ambio. 2016 Dec;45(8):872-884
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biofuels
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Crops, Agricultural - growth & development
Ecosystem
Eutrophication
Global Warming - prevention & control
Greenhouse Effect
Renewable Energy
Salix - growth & development
Sweden
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
Whilst life cycle assessment (LCA) boundaries are expanded to account for negative indirect consequences of bioenergy such as indirect land use change (ILUC), ecosystem services such as water purification sometimes delivered by perennial bioenergy crops are typically neglected in LCA studies. Consequential LCA was applied to evaluate the significance of nutrient interception and retention on the environmental balance of unfertilised energy willow planted on 50-m riparian buffer strips and drainage filtration zones in the Skåne region of Sweden. Excluding possible ILUC effects and considering oil heat substitution, strategically planted filter willow can achieve net global warming potential (GWP) and eutrophication potential (EP) savings of up to 11.9 Mg CO2e and 47 kg PO4e ha(-1) year(-1), respectively, compared with a GWP saving of 14.8 Mg CO2e ha(-1) year(-1) and an EP increase of 7 kg PO4e ha(-1) year(-1) for fertilised willow. Planting willow on appropriate buffer and filter zones throughout Skåne could avoid 626 Mg year(-1) PO4e nutrient loading to waters.
PubMed ID
27240661 View in PubMed
Less detail

Co-digestion of cultivated microalgae and sewage sludge from municipal waste water treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263567
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2014 Nov;171:203-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Jesper Olsson
Xin Mei Feng
Johnny Ascue
Francesco G Gentili
M A Shabiimam
Emma Nehrenheim
Eva Thorin
Source
Bioresour Technol. 2014 Nov;171:203-10
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Biofuels
Lakes - microbiology
Methane - biosynthesis
Microalgae - metabolism
Sewage - microbiology
Sweden
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - microbiology
Abstract
In this study two wet microalgae cultures and one dried microalgae culture were co-digested in different proportions with sewage sludge in mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The aim was to evaluate if the co-digestion could lead to an increased efficiency of methane production compared to digestion of sewage sludge alone. The results showed that co-digestion with both wet and dried microalgae, in certain proportions, increased the biochemical methane potential (BMP) compared with digestion of sewage sludge alone in mesophilic conditions. The BMP was significantly higher than the calculated BMP in many of the mixtures. This synergetic effect was statistically significant in a mixture containing 63% (w/w VS based) undigested sewage sludge and 37% (w/w VS based) wet algae slurry, which produced 23% more methane than observed with undigested sewage sludge alone. The trend was that thermophilic co-digestion of microalgae and undigested sewage sludge did not give the same synergy.
PubMed ID
25203227 View in PubMed
Less detail

Co-digestion of manure and industrial waste--The effects of trace element addition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276213
Source
Waste Manag. 2016 Jan;47(Pt A):21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Erik Nordell
Britt Nilsson
Sören Nilsson Påledal
Kaisa Karisalmi
Jan Moestedt
Source
Waste Manag. 2016 Jan;47(Pt A):21-7
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biofuels - analysis
Bioreactors
Cattle
Industrial Waste - analysis
Manure - analysis
Sus scrofa
Sweden
Trace Elements - metabolism
Abstract
Manure is one of the most common substrates for biogas production. Manure from dairy- and swine animals are often considered to stabilize the biogas process by contributing nutrients and trace elements needed for the biogas process. In this study two lab-scale reactors were used to evaluate the effects of trace element addition during co-digestion of manure from swine- and dairy animals with industrial waste. The substrate used contained high background concentrations of both cobalt and nickel, which are considered to be the most important trace elements. In the reactor receiving additional trace elements, the volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration was 89% lower than in the control reactor. The lower VFA concentration contributed to a more digested digestate, and thus lower methane emissions in the subsequent storage. Also, the biogas production rate increased with 24% and the biogas production yield with 10%, both as a result of the additional trace elements at high organic loading rates. All in all, even though 50% of the feedstock consisted of manure, trace element addition resulted in multiple positive effects and a more reliable process with stable and high yield.
PubMed ID
25812806 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of operating strategies for increased biogas production from thin stillage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258159
Source
J Biotechnol. 2014 Apr 10;175:22-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2014
Author
Jan Moestedt
Erik Nordell
Anna Schnürer
Author Affiliation
Tekniska verken i Linköping AB (publ.), Department of Biogas R&D, Box 1500, SE-581 15 Linköping, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7025, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: jan.moestedt@tekniskaverken.se.
Source
J Biotechnol. 2014 Apr 10;175:22-30
Date
Apr-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ammonia - metabolism
Archaea - genetics
Bacteria - genetics
Biofuels - analysis - microbiology
Biomass
Bioreactors
Biotechnology - methods
Hydrogen Sulfide - metabolism
Sweden
Temperature
Abstract
The effect of increasing organic loading rate (OLR) and simultaneously decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT) during anaerobic digestion of sulphur- and nitrogen-rich thin stillage was investigated during operation of continuously stirred tank laboratory reactors at two different temperatures. The operating strategies and substrate were set in order to mimic an existing full-scale commercial biogas plant in Sweden. The reactors were operated for 554-570 days with a substrate mixture of thin stillage and milled grain, resulting in high ammonium concentrations (>4.5gL(-1)). Initially, one reactor was operated at 38°C, as in the full-scale plant, while in the experimental reactor the temperature was raised to 44°C. Both reactors were then subjected to increasing OLR (from 3.2 to 6.0gVSL(-1)d(-1)) and simultaneously decreasing HRT (from 45 to 24 days) to evaluate the effects of these operational strategies on process stability, hydrogen sulphide levels and microbial composition. The results showed that operation at 44°C was the most successful strategy, resulting in up to 22% higher methane yield compared with the mesophilic reactor, despite higher free ammonia concentration. Furthermore, kinetic studies revealed higher biogas production rate at 44°C compared with 38°C, while the level of hydrogen sulphide was not affected. Quantitative PCR analysis of the microbiological population showed that methanogenic archaea and syntrophic acetate-oxidising bacteria had responded to the new process temperature while sulphate-reducing bacteria were only marginally affected by the temperature-change.
PubMed ID
24524873 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decision support framework for evaluating the operational environment of forest bioenergy production and use: Case of four European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282143
Source
J Environ Manage. 2016 Sep 15;180:68-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2016
Author
Špela Pezdevšek Malovrh
Mikko Kurttila
Teppo Hujala
Leena Kärkkäinen
Vasja Leban
Berit H Lindstad
Dörte Marie Peters
Regina Rhodius
Birger Solberg
Kristina Wirth
Lidija Zadnik Stirn
Janez Krc
Source
J Environ Manage. 2016 Sep 15;180:68-81
Date
Sep-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biofuels
Decision Making
Decision Support Techniques
Environmental Policy
Finland
Forestry - methods
Forests
Germany
Humans
Norway
Policy Making
Slovenia
Abstract
Complex policy-making situations around bioenergy production and use require examination of the operational environment of the society and a participatory approach. This paper presents and demonstrates a three-phase decision-making framework for analysing the operational environment of strategies related to increased forest bioenergy targets. The framework is based on SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis and the Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART). Stakeholders of four case countries (Finland, Germany, Norway and Slovenia) defined the factors that affect the operational environments, classified in four pre-set categories (Forest Characteristics and Management, Policy Framework, Technology and Science, and Consumers and Society). The stakeholders participated in weighting of SWOT items for two future scenarios with SMART technique. The first scenario reflected the current 2020 targets (the Business-as-Usual scenario), and the second scenario contained a further increase in the targets (the Increase scenario). This framework can be applied to various problems of environmental management and also to other fields where public decision-making is combined with stakeholders' engagement. The case results show that the greatest differences between the scenarios appear in Germany, indicating a notably negative outlook for the Increase scenario, while the smallest differences were found in Finland. Policy Framework was a highly rated category across the countries, mainly with respect to weaknesses and threats. Intensified forest bioenergy harvesting and utilization has potentially wide country-specific impacts which need to be anticipated and considered in national policies and public dialogue.
PubMed ID
27208996 View in PubMed
Less detail

29 records – page 1 of 3.