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445 records – page 1 of 45.

The 1300-year dynamics of vegetation cover in the Lake Shira depression (Khakassia, Siberia, Russia) reconstructed on the basis of bottom sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263196
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2014 Jul;457(1):248-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
K E Vershinin
D Yu Rogozin
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2014 Jul;457(1):248-51
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Biomass
Geologic sediments
Lakes
Paleontology
Plant Physiological Processes
Siberia
PubMed ID
25172593 View in PubMed
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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Conference (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 54 p.
Publication Type
Report
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Conference (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 54 p.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Alaska
Chukotka
Climate change
Arctic Council
Biodiversity
Human Rights
Environment
Sustainable development
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2010-2011 Annual Report: Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297081
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 26 p.
Publication Type
Report
....................................................................................................................................................................... 13 WILDLIFE AND SUSTAINABLE UTILIZATION ....................................................................................................................................... 14 BIODIVERSITY: ACCESS AND BENEFIT SHARING
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 26 p.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2639832
Keywords
Inuit
Alaska
Chukotka
Wildlife
Biodiversity
Health
Environment
Sustainable development
Documents

20102011annualreportenglish.pdf

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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 34 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
..................................................................................................................................... 11 Wildlife and Sustainable Utilization ..................................................................................................... 11 Biodiversity: Access and Benefit Sharing ............................................................................................. 12 ArcticNet
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada. Ottawa, ON. 34 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3283810
Keywords
Inuit
Climate change
Wildlife
Biodiversity
Sustainable development
Environment
Health
Mercury
Languages
Documents

merged_document__2_.pdf

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[Abundance and diversity of methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria in northern wetlands].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259581
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2014 Mar-Apr;83(2):204-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Danilova
S N Dedysh
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2014 Mar-Apr;83(2):204-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Fresh Water - microbiology
Gammaproteobacteria - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Methane - metabolism
Methylococcaceae - genetics
Methylocystaceae - genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
Oxygenases - genetics
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
Russia
Wetlands
Abstract
Numeric abundance, identity and pH preferences of methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria (type I methanotrophs) inhabiting the northern acidic wetlands were studied. The rates of methane oxidation by peat samples from six-wetlands of European Northern Russia (pH 3.9-4.7) varied from 0.04 to 0.60 µg CH4 g(-1) peat h(-1). The number of cells revealed by hybridization with fluorochrome-labeled probes M84 + M705 specific for type I methanotrophs was 0.05-2.16 x 10(5) cells g(-1) dry peat, i.e. 0.4-12.5% of the total number of methanotrophs and 0.004-0.39% of the total number of bacteria. Analysis of the fragments of the pmoA gene encoding particulate methane monooxygenase revealed predominance of the genus Methylocystis (92% of the clones) in the studied sample of acidic peat, while the proportion of the pmoA sequences of type I methanotrophs was insignificant (8%). PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene fragments of type I methanotrophs with TypeIF-Type IR primers had low specificity, since only three sequences out of 53 analyzed belonged to methanotrophs and exhibited 93-99% similarity to those of Methylovulum, Methylomonas, and Methylobacter species. Isolates of type I methanotrophs obtained from peat (strains SH10 and 83A5) were identified as members of the species Methylomonaspaludis and Methylovulum miyakonense, respectively. Only Methylomonaspaludum SH10 was capable of growth in acidic media (pH range for growth 3.8-7.2 with the optimum at pH 5.8-6.2), while Methylovulum miyakonense 83A5 exhibited the typical growth characteristics of neutrophilic methanotrophs (pH range for growth 5.5-8.0 with the optimum at pH 6.5-7.5).
PubMed ID
25423724 View in PubMed
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Activity and diversity of methane-oxidizing bacteria along a Norwegian sub-Arctic glacier forefield.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299197
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 05 01; 94(5):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-01-2018
Author
Alejandro Mateos-Rivera
Lise Øvreås
Bryan Wilson
Jacob C Yde
Kai W Finster
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Bergen, NO-5020, Bergen, Norway.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 05 01; 94(5):
Date
05-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Ice Cover - microbiology
Methane - metabolism
Methylococcaceae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Norway
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
Methane (CH4) is one of the most abundant greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and identification of its sources and sinks is crucial for the reliability of climate model outputs. Although CH4 production and consumption rates have been reported from a broad spectrum of environments, data obtained from glacier forefields are restricted to a few locations. We report the activities of methanotrophic communities and their diversity along a chronosequence in front of a sub-Arctic glacier using high-throughput sequencing and gas flux measurements. CH4 oxidation rates were measured in the field throughout the growing season during three sampling times at eight different sampling points in combination with laboratory incubation experiments. The overall results showed that the methanotrophic community had similar trends of increased CH4 consumption and increased abundance as a function of soil development and time of year. Sequencing results revealed that the methanotrophic community was dominated by a few OTUs and that a short-term increase in CH4 concentration, as performed in the field measurements, altered slightly the relative abundance of the OTUs.
PubMed ID
29617984 View in PubMed
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Additive partitioning of testate amoeba species diversity across habitat hierarchy within the pristine southern taiga landscape (Pechora-Ilych Biosphere Reserve, Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262104
Source
Eur J Protistol. 2015 Feb;51(1):42-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Andrey N Tsyganov
Alexander A Komarov
Edward A D Mitchell
Satoshi Shimano
Olga V Smirnova
Alexey A Aleynikov
Yuri A Mazei
Source
Eur J Protistol. 2015 Feb;51(1):42-54
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amoeba - classification - physiology
Biodiversity
Russia
Soil - parasitology
Taiga
Abstract
In order to better understand the distribution patterns of terrestrial eukaryotic microbes and the factors governing them, we studied the diversity partitioning of soil testate amoebae across levels of spatially nested habitat hierarchy in the largest European old-growth dark coniferous forest (Pechora-Ilych Biosphere Reserve; Komi Republic, Russia). The variation in testate amoeba species richness and assemblage structure was analysed in 87 samples from six biotopes in six vegetation types using an additive partitioning procedure and principal component analyses. The 80 taxa recorded represent the highest value of species richness for soil testate amoebae reported for taiga soils so far. Our results indicate that testate amoeba assemblages were highly aggregated at all levels and were mostly controlled by environmental factors rather than dispersal processes. The variation in species diversity of testate amoebae increased from the lowest to the highest hierarchical level. We conclude that, similarly to macroscopic organisms, testate amoeba species richness and community structure are primarily controlled by environmental conditions within the landscape and suggest that metacommunity dynamics of free-living microorganisms are driven by species sorting and/or mass effect processes.
PubMed ID
25553551 View in PubMed
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Alaska Marine Conservation Council (AMCC)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288385
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Marine Conservation Council (AMCC)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Changing Ecosystem
Marine biodiversity & Sustainability
Oceans and Seas
Natural resources
Climate change
Abstract
AMCC works with scientists, subsistence harvesters, fishermen, and natural resource managers to understand the effects of warming oceans and ocean acidification.
Online Resources
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Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288398
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alfred-Wegener-Institut
Language
English
German
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Changing Ecosystem
Marine biodiversity & Sustainability
Ice
Oceans and Seas
Arctic Regions
Antarctic Regions
Abstract
The Alfred Wegener Institute carries out research in the Arctic and Antarctic as well as in the high and mid latitude oceans. The institute coordinates German polar research and makes available to national and international science important infrastructure, e.g. the research ice breaker "Polarstern" and research stations in the Arctic and Antarctic.
Online Resources
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Alien roadside species more easily invade alpine than lowland plant communities in a subarctic mountain ecosystem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259937
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(2):e89664
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Jonas J Lembrechts
Ann Milbau
Ivan Nijs
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(2):e89664
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altitude
Biodiversity
Ecosystem
Environment
Environmental Policy
Introduced species
Norway
Plants
Species Specificity
Abstract
Effects of roads on plant communities are not well known in cold-climate mountain ecosystems, where road building and development are expected to increase in future decades. Knowledge of the sensitivity of mountain plant communities to disturbance by roads is however important for future conservation purposes. We investigate the effects of roads on species richness and composition, including the plant strategies that are most affected, along three elevational gradients in a subarctic mountain ecosystem. We also examine whether mountain roads promote the introduction and invasion of alien plant species from the lowlands to the alpine zone. Observations of plant community composition were made together with abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors in 60 T-shaped transects. Alpine plant communities reacted differently to road disturbances than their lowland counterparts. On high elevations, the roadside species composition was more similar to that of the local natural communities. Less competitive and ruderal species were present at high compared with lower elevation roadsides. While the effects of roads thus seem to be mitigated in the alpine environment for plant species in general, mountain plant communities are more invasible than lowland communities. More precisely, relatively more alien species present in the roadside were found to invade into the surrounding natural community at high compared to low elevations. We conclude that effects of roads and introduction of alien species in lowlands cannot simply be extrapolated to the alpine and subarctic environment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24586947 View in PubMed
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445 records – page 1 of 45.