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420 records – page 1 of 42.

[Ecologically critical areas of broad-leaved Korean pine mixed forest in Changbai Mountains, China].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267253
Source
Ying Yong Sheng Tai Xue Bao. 2014 May;25(5):1250-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Lin-Qian Yu
Jing-Wen Li
Xiu-Hai Zhao
Lin Ma
Shang Wu
Xue-Qi Bai
Source
Ying Yong Sheng Tai Xue Bao. 2014 May;25(5):1250-8
Date
May-2014
Language
Chinese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
China
Ecology
Forests
Pinus
Trees
Abstract
In order to improve the protection system to reduce the damage of biodiversity and protect broad-leaved Korean pine mixed forest, 64 forest farms from 6 Forestry Bureaus around Changbai Mountains Nature Reserve were investigated and analyzed. A total of 41 plants were selected as key protected plants, and felling area, cropland, mining area, highway, railway and residential area were considered as the disturbance factors. GAP and GIS spatial analysis were used to draw the indicator plant and disturbance intensity distribution maps. The results showed that the indicator species distribution was uneven. The indicator plant enrichment regions were located on the north western and southern slopes centered with Shengli and Lenggouzi forest farms of Quanyang County, respectively, and single distributions of the endemic plants were found in Baoshan, Henshan, Lenggouzi and Heishan forest farms. The different disturbance severities were observed in the different forest farms, among which the north part in Lushuihe and Baihe forest farms were severely disrupted. Two ecologically critical areas, Quanyang-Lushuihe-Baihe on the north slope of Changbai Mountains and the east part of Changbai County on the south slope, were determined based on the comprehensive analysis.
PubMed ID
25129922 View in PubMed
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Land use influences macroinvertebrate community composition in boreal headwaters through altered stream conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281334
Source
Ambio. 2017 Apr;46(3):311-323
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Micael Jonsson
Ryan M Burrows
Johan Lidman
Emma Fältström
Hjalmar Laudon
Ryan A Sponseller
Source
Ambio. 2017 Apr;46(3):311-323
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biodiversity
Forests
Invertebrates
Rivers
Sweden
Abstract
Land use is known to alter the nature of land-water interactions, but the potential effects of widespread forest management on headwaters in boreal regions remain poorly understood. We evaluated the importance of catchment land use, land cover, and local stream variables for macroinvertebrate community and functional trait diversity in 18 boreal headwater streams. Variation in macroinvertebrate metrics was often best explained by in-stream variables, primarily water chemistry (e.g. pH). However, variation in stream variables was, in turn, significantly associated with catchment-scale forestry land use. More specifically, streams running through catchments that were dominated by young (11-50 years) forests had higher pH, greater organic matter standing stock, higher abundance of aquatic moss, and the highest macroinvertebrate diversity, compared to streams running through recently clear-cut and old forests. This indicates that catchment-scale forest management can modify in-stream habitat conditions with effects on stream macroinvertebrate communities and that characteristics of younger forests may promote conditions that benefit headwater biodiversity.
Notes
Cites: Ecology. 2009 May;90(5):1227-4119537544
Cites: Environ Manage. 2011 Jan;47(1):28-3921132293
Cites: Ambio. 2009 Nov;38(7):357-6319943391
Cites: Ambio. 2014 Mar;43(2):218-3324046144
Cites: Ambio. 2016 Feb;45 Suppl 2:188-20226744053
PubMed ID
27804095 View in PubMed
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Evaluating species richness: Biased ecological inference results from spatial heterogeneity in detection probabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268704
Source
Ecol Appl. 2015 Sep;25(6):1669-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Lance B McNew
Colleen M Handel
Source
Ecol Appl. 2015 Sep;25(6):1669-80
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Biodiversity
Computer simulation
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Abstract
Accurate estimates of species richness are necessary to test predictions of ecological theory and evaluate biodiversity for conservation purposes. However, species richness is difficult to measure in the field because some species will almost always be overlooked due to their cryptic nature or the observer's failure to perceive their cues. Common measures of species richness that assume consistent observability across species are inviting because they may require only single counts of species at survey sites. Single-visit estimation methods ignore spatial and temporal variation in species detection probabilities related to survey or site conditions that may confound estimates of species richness. We used simulated and empirical data to evaluate the bias and precision of raw species counts, the limiting forms of jackknife and Chao estimators, and multispecies occupancy models when estimating species richness to evaluate whether the choice of estimator can affect inferences about the relationships between environmental conditions and community size under variable detection processes. Four simulated scenarios with realistic and variable detection processes were considered. Results of simulations indicated that (1) raw species counts were always biased low, (2) single-visit jackknife and Chao estimators were significantly biased regardless of detection process, (3) multispecies occupancy models were more precise and generally less biased than the jackknife and Chao estimators, and (4) spatial heterogeneity resulting from the effects of a site covariate on species detection probabilities had significant impacts on the inferred relationships between species richness and a spatially explicit environmental condition. For a real data set of bird observations in northwestern Alaska, USA, the four estimation methods produced different estimates of local species richness, which severely affected inferences about the effects of shrubs on local avian richness. Overall, our results indicate that neglecting the effects of site covariates on species detection probabilities may lead to significant bias in estimation of species richness, as well as the inferred relationships between community size and environmental covariates.
PubMed ID
26552273 View in PubMed
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The first reconstruction of the late glacial plant communities on the Yamal Peninsula based on plant macrofossils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259359
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2014 Mar;455(1):83-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
O M Korona
S S Trofimova
E G Lapteva
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2014 Mar;455(1):83-6
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiosperms - genetics - physiology
Biodiversity
Fossils
Siberia
Tundra
PubMed ID
24795177 View in PubMed
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Uneven-aged silviculture can enhance within stand heterogeneity and beetle diversity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295747
Source
J Environ Manage. 2018 Jan 01; 205:1-8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-01-2018
Author
Klara Joelsson
Joakim Hjältén
Timothy Work
Author Affiliation
Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden. Electronic address: klara.joelsson@slu.se.
Source
J Environ Manage. 2018 Jan 01; 205:1-8
Date
Jan-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Biodiversity
Coleoptera
Ecosystem
Forests
Sweden
Trees
Abstract
Uneven-aged silviculture may better maintain species assemblages associated with old-growth forests than clear felling in part due to habitat heterogeneity created by maintaining standing retention strips adjacent to harvest trails. Retention strips and harvest trails created at the time of tree removal will likely have different microclimate and may harbor different assemblages. In some cases, the resultant stand heterogeneity associated with uneven-aged silviculture may be similar to natural small-scale disturbances. For beetles, increased light and temperature as well as potential access to young vegetation and deadwood substrates present in harvset trails may harbor beetle assemblages similar to those found in natural gaps. We sampled saproxylic beetles using flight intercept traps placed in harvest corridors and retention strips in 9 replicated uneven-aged spruce stands in central Sweden. We compared abundance, species richness and composition between harvest corridors and retention strips using generalized linear models, rarefaction, permutational multivariate analysis of variance and indicator species analysis. Canopy openness doubled, mean temperature and variability in daily temperature increased and humidity decreased on harvest trails. Beetle richness and abundance were greater in harvests trails than in retention strips and the beetle species composition differed significantly between habitats. Twenty-five species were associated with harvest trails, including three old-growth specialists such as Agathidium discoideum (Erichson), currently red-listed. We observed only one species, Xylechinus pilosus (Ratzeburg) that strongly favored retention strips. Harvest trails foster both open habitat species and old-growth species while retention strips harbored forest interior specialists. The combination of closed canopy, stratified forest in the retention strips and gap-like conditions on the harvest trails thus increases overall species richness and maintains more diverse assemblages at the stand level than would otherwise be seen in less heterogeneous stand types. This suggests that uneven-aged silviculture may provide added conservation benefits for both open habitat and old-growth specialists than silvicultural approaches that reduce stand heterogeneity.
PubMed ID
28961435 View in PubMed
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Flow regimes filter species traits of benthic diatom communities and modify the functional features of lowland streams - a nationwide scale study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296520
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Feb 15; 651(Pt 1):357-366
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-15-2019
Author
Naicheng Wu
Hans Thodsen
Hans Estrup Andersen
Henrik Tornbjerg
Annette Baattrup-Pedersen
Tenna Riis
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies, Aarhus University, Høegh-Guldbergs Gade 6B, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark; Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Ole Worms Allé 1, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. Electronic address: naichengwu88@gmail.com.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Feb 15; 651(Pt 1):357-366
Date
Feb-15-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Denmark
Diatoms - physiology
Rivers
Water Movements
Abstract
Changes in land use, climate and flow diversion are key drivers of river flow regime change that may eventually affect freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem functions. However, our knowledge is limited on how the functional features of stream organisms vary along the gradient of hydrological disturbance (i.e. flow regime changes) and how flow regimes mediate the functional features in lowland streams. We analyzed the functional traits of benthic diatoms (unicellular siliceous algae) that are most sensitive and tolerant to flow regime changes along a nationwide scale of 246 sites in Denmark. We combined RLQ and fourth-corner analyses to explore the co-variation between hydrological variables (R table) and species traits (Q table), constrained by the relative abundance of each species (L table) as observed in each of the sampling sites. Further, we examine the relationships between functional features (i.e., functional redundancy and diversity) and hydrological variables by multivariate statistical analyses. Results show that species turnover with displacement of sensitive species by tolerant species was the dominating process in benthic diatom communities during high flow disturbances. Functional features, as indicated by functional diversity and redundancy indices, were mediated mainly by high and low flow magnitude. Median daily flow magnitude shows a consistent positive relationship with functional redundancy and richness indices indicating that larger streams are more resilient to flow perturbations. In addition flow regime changes are less important than median daily flow magnitude and show inconsistent correlation to functional features likely due to the interaction of multiple environmental stressors. Our study highlights the robustness of trait-based approaches for identifying flow regime changes in streams, and strongly suggests that biodiversity conservation and water resource management should focus on protecting natural base flow in headwater streams and generally reduce flow regulation for sustaining stream ecosystems under future global changes.
PubMed ID
30240919 View in PubMed
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Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277627
Source
J Insect Sci. 2016;16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Hanne Eik Pilskog
Tone Birkemoe
Erik Framstad
Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson
Source
J Insect Sci. 2016;16
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Beetles
Biodiversity
Ecosystem
Norway
Quercus
Trees
Abstract
One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2000 Mar 10;287(5459):1770-410710299
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2001 Sep 7;268(1478):1791-611522197
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2006 Feb;20(1):212-716909674
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2008 Oct;22(5):1309-1918680500
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2009 Oct;23(5):1167-7519765035
Cites: Nature. 2011 Mar 3;471(7336):51-721368823
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(5):e3735922629384
Cites: Science. 2012 Dec 7;338(6112):1305-623224548
PubMed ID
26945089 View in PubMed
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Ancient DNA sheds new light on the Svalbard foraminiferal fossil record of the last millennium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260488
Source
Geobiology. 2014 Jul;12(4):277-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
J. Pawlowska
F. Lejzerowicz
P. Esling
W. Szczucinski
M. Zajaczkowski
J. Pawlowski
Source
Geobiology. 2014 Jul;12(4):277-88
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
DNA - analysis
Foraminifera - genetics
Fossils
Metagenomics
Abstract
Recent palaeogenetic studies have demonstrated the occurrence of preserved ancient DNA (aDNA) in various types of fossilised material. Environmental aDNA sequences assigned to modern species have been recovered from marine sediments dating to the Pleistocene. However, the match between the aDNA and the fossil record still needs to be evaluated for the environmental DNA approaches to be fully exploited. Here, we focus on foraminifera in sediments up to one thousand years old retrieved from the Hornsund fjord (Svalbard). We compared the diversity of foraminiferal microfossil assemblages with the diversity of aDNA sequenced from subsurface sediment samples using both cloning and high-throughput sequencing (HTS). Our study shows that 57% of the species archived in the fossil record were also detected in the aDNA data. However, the relative abundance of aDNA sequence reads and fossil specimens differed considerably. We also found a limited match between the stratigraphic occurrence of some fossil species and their aDNA sequences, especially in the case of rare taxa. The aDNA data comprised a high proportion of non-fossilised monothalamous species, which are known to dominate in modern foraminiferal communities of the Svalbard region. Our results confirm the relevance of HTS for studying past micro-eukaryotic diversity and provide insight into its ability to reflect fossil assemblages. Palaeogenetic studies including aDNA analyses of non-fossilised groups expand the range of palaeoceanographical proxies and therefore may increase the accuracy of palaeoenvironmental reconstructions.
PubMed ID
24730667 View in PubMed
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Annual Report 2009-2010 : Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297080
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 33 p.
Publication Type
Report
Sustainable Use of Wildlife 9 Biodiversity – Access and Benefit Sharing 11 ArcticNet 11 International Polar Year 12 Circumpolar Flaw Lead Study 12 Contaminants 13 Circumpolar Health 14 Preparation for 2010 General Assembly in Nuuk, Greenland 16 Arctic Sovereignty 16 Financial Report 18 Annex I
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 33 p.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2148858
Keywords
Inuit
Human Rights
Biodiversity
Language
Health
Contaminants
Documents

20092010iccannualreport.pdf

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Can trait patterns along gradients predict plant community responses to climate change?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293090
Source
Ecology. 2016 Oct; 97(10):2791-2801
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
John Guittar
Deborah Goldberg
Kari Klanderud
Richard J Telford
Vigdis Vandvik
Author Affiliation
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109, USA.
Source
Ecology. 2016 Oct; 97(10):2791-2801
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Climate change
Norway
Plant Leaves
Plants
Abstract
Plant functional traits vary consistently along climate gradients and are therefore potential predictors of plant community response to climate change. We test this space-for-time assumption by combining a spatial gradient study with whole-community turf transplantation along temperature and precipitation gradients in a network of 12 grassland sites in Southern Norway. Using data on eight traits for 169 species and annual vegetation censuses of 235 turfs over 5 yr, we quantify trait-based responses to climate change by comparing observed community dynamics in transplanted turfs to field-parameterized null model simulations. Three traits related to species architecture (maximum height, number of dormant meristems, and ramet-ramet connection persistence) varied consistently along spatial temperature gradients and also correlated to changes in species abundances in turfs transplanted to warmer climates. Two traits associated with resource acquisition strategy (SLA, leaf area) increased along spatial temperature gradients but did not correlate to changes in species abundances following warming. No traits correlated consistently with precipitation. Our study supports the hypothesis that spatial associations between plant traits and broad-scale climate variables can be predictive of community response to climate change, but it also suggests that not all traits with clear patterns along climate gradients will necessarily influence community response to an equal degree.
PubMed ID
27859101 View in PubMed
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420 records – page 1 of 42.