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Analysis of newspaper coverage of active aging through the lens of the 2002 World Health Organization Active Ageing Report: A Policy Framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257220
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Dec;10(12):6799-819
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Boushra Abdullah
Gregor Wolbring
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary AB T2N 4N1, Canada. gwolbrin@ucalgary.ca.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Dec;10(12):6799-819
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Bibliometrics
Canada
Health Policy
Health promotion
Humans
Motor Activity
Newspapers - statistics & numerical data
Public Health
Socioeconomic Factors
World Health Organization
Abstract
As populations continue to grow older, efforts to support the process of aging well are important goals. Various synonyms are used to cover aging well, such as active aging. The World Health Organization published in 2002 the report Active Ageing: A Policy Framework that according to the call for papers, has brought active ageing to the forefront of international public health awareness. The 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A Global Call for Action was singled out in the call for papers as a key document promoting physical activity one goal of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework. Media are to report to the public topics of importance to them. We investigated the newspaper coverage of aging well and synonymous terms such as active aging through the lens of the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity. As sources we used the following newspapers: China Daily, The Star (Malaysia), two UK newspapers (The Guardian, The Times), a database of 300 Canadian newspapers (Canadian Newsstand) and a US newspaper (The New York Times). The study generated data answering the following four research questions: (1) how often are the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity mentioned; (2) how often is the topic of active aging and terms conveying similar content (aging well, healthy aging, natural aging and successful aging) discussed; (3) which of the issues flagged as important in the 2002 WHO active aging policy framework and the 2010 Toronto Charter for Physical Activity are covered in the newspaper coverage of active aging and synonymous terms; (4) which social groups were mentioned in the newspapers covered. The study found a total absence of mentioning of the two key documents and a low level of coverage of "active aging" and terms conveying similar content. It found further a lack of engagement with the issues raised in the two key documents and a low level of mentioning of socially disadvantages groups. We posit that reading the newspapers we covered will not expose the reader to the two key documents and the issues linked to aging well including the need to increase physical activity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24317386 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the publication volume of Canadian ophthalmology departments from 2005 to 2009: a systematic review of the literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137425
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):66-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Andrew Micieli
Jonathan A Micieli
Andrew F Smith
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada. andrew.smith@medmetricsinc.com
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):66-71
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - statistics & numerical data
Bibliometrics
Biomedical Research - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Databases, Factual
Humans
Journal Impact Factor
Ophthalmology - statistics & numerical data
Periodicals as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Publishing - statistics & numerical data
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess the publication volume of Canadian ophthalmology departments over a 5-year period, 2005-2009.
Systematic review of the literature.
MEDLINE was searched for papers published from 2005 to 2009 where the designated affiliation corresponded to a Canadian ophthalmology department. The papers were sorted by year, university, and study design. A total impact score (the impact factor of the journal multiplied by the number of papers published in that journal per year) was also calculated for each university.
In the 5-year period there was an increasing trend in the total number of published ophthalmology papers. The University of Toronto had the highest number of published papers (224), followed by the University of British Columbia (143) and McGill University (120). The Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology published the most papers, followed by Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. The most frequent study design category was basic science research and a total of 11 different randomized controlled trials were retrieved.
The publication volume of Canadian ophthalmology researchers increased significantly from 2005 to 2009 with larger institutions accounting for the majority of published papers. Like researchers in other countries, Canadian ophthalmology researchers preferred to publish in domestic journals.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Oct;46(5):440-1; author reply 44121995990
PubMed ID
21283161 View in PubMed
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An assessment protocol for gender analysis of medical literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52563
Source
Women Health. 1999;29(2):81-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
K. Alexanderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environment, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden. krial@soc.liu.se
Source
Women Health. 1999;29(2):81-98
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliometrics
Curriculum
Education, Medical
Epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Prejudice
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Textbooks
Women's health
Abstract
Although medical research has been criticized for gender bias, few studies have dealt with how such bias affects medical education and textbooks. There is an extensive body of literature showing that most scientific research has been performed by men on men or on male laboratory animals. The male is often considered the norm, the female the exception. This probably has a significant impact on the training of medical students, which is often gender biased, as well as on medical practice. A few studies have actually evaluated medical textbooks from a gender perspective, but a standard instrument or protocol is needed for such assessment. The present work, which was commissioned by a Swedish university, entailed the construction of an instrument that will facilitate gender analysis of medical textbooks.
PubMed ID
10427650 View in PubMed
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Artificial Nutritional Support Registries: systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98458
Source
Nutr Hosp. 2009 Nov-Dec;24(6):711-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
I. Castelló-Botía
C. Wanden-Berghe
J. Sanz-Valero
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Enfermería Comunitaria, Salud Pública, Medicina Preventiva e Historia de la Ciencia, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante, España. isabel.castello@ua.com
Source
Nutr Hosp. 2009 Nov-Dec;24(6):711-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bibliometrics
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Bibliographic - statistics & numerical data
Forms and Records Control
Home Nursing - utilization
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support - methods - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The nutritional registries are data bases through which we obtain the information to understand the nutrition of populations. Several main nutrition societies of the world have these types of registries, outstanding the NADYA (Home artificial and Ambulatory nutrition) group in Spain. The object of this study is to determine by means of a systematic review, the existent scientific production in the international data bases referred to nutritional support registries. METHODS: Descriptive transversal study of the results of a critical bibliographic research done in the bioscience data bases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, ISI (Web of Sciences), LILACS, CINHAL. RESULTS: A total of 20 original articles related to nutritional registries were found and recovered. Eleven registries of eight countries were identified: Australia, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Sweden, United Status and United Kingdom. The Price Index was of 65% and all the articles were published in the last 20 years. CONCLUSIONS: The Price Index highlights the innovativeness of this practice. The articles related to nutritional support are heterogeneous with respect to data and population, which exposes this as a limitation for a combined analysis.
PubMed ID
20049375 View in PubMed
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Bibliographic characteristics of the research output of pediatric anesthesiologists in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144882
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2010 Jun;57(6):573-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
James D O'Leary
Mark W Crawford
Author Affiliation
The Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2010 Jun;57(6):573-7
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology
Bibliometrics
Biomedical Research - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Child
Databases, Bibliographic - statistics & numerical data
Efficiency, Organizational
Humans
Abstract
Various bibliometric citation indices have been used to evaluate research productivity and scientific impact, but recently, Hirsch's h-index has gained widespread recognition. Although described initially for physical sciences, h-indices are being used to assess research productivity and impact in other disciplines.
In this descriptive study, Scopus and Web of Science(R) citation databases were used to identify the bibliographic characteristics of pediatric anesthesiologists from all university affiliated departments of pediatric anesthesia in Canada up to May 2009. For each anesthesiologist, the h-index, mean citations per publication, total number of publications, total number of citations, and year of first publication were determined.
A study population of 151 pediatric anesthesiologists was identified. The range of h-index values for this cohort was 0-32 with a median (interquartile range) of 2 (1-5). The 90(th) percentile was 8.0. The median (interquartile range) number of citations per publication was 6 (1-15), with a range of 0-87. The median (interquartile range) number of publications was 4 (1-9) with a range of 0-165.
We describe the bibliographic characteristics of the research output of pediatric anesthesiologists in Canada. This study highlights the growing influence of scientometrics on the evaluation of scientific performance in medical specialties.
PubMed ID
20229218 View in PubMed
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A bibliometric analysis of cancer among American Indians & Alaska Natives, 1966-1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4085
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;37(2):59-62, 77
Publication Type
Article
Author
M C Mahoney
A M Michalek
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational Affairs, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1995 Apr-Jun;37(2):59-62, 77
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Bibliometrics
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
MEDLINE
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
A bibliometric analysis was employed to objectively assess scientific studies published between 1966 and 1993 which have described cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Searches of the MEDLINE (1966-1993) and CANCERLIT data bases (1983-1994) were used to identify relevant publications. In addition to examining publication sources and quantitative temporal trends, further bibliometric analyses were completed by considering a subset of papers published between 1982 and 1992. A total of 128 studies of cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives were published between 1966 and 1993; 62 of these articles (48%) appeared between 1988 and 1993. Nine journals accounted for 53% of the total publications. The subset of 68 papers published between 1982 and 1992 were cited a total of 388 times in 136 different journals; the median number of citations was 2. Results demonstrate a limited number of published papers on cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives. It is hoped that this paper will increase the awareness of cancer as an important health problem among American Indian and Alaska Natives and thereby serve to stimulate additional cancer-related research activities involving these groups.
PubMed ID
7661328 View in PubMed
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[Bibliometric analysis of Danish medical research 1986-1992]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48354
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Sep 11;157(37):5075-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-1995
Author
P C Gøtzsche
J W Krog
R. Moustgaard
Author Affiliation
Udviklingsafdelingen, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Sep 11;157(37):5075-81
Date
Sep-11-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliometrics
Clinical Trials
Comparative Study
Denmark
Efficiency
English Abstract
Humans
Norway
Publishing
Research
Research Support
Sweden
Abstract
The productivity of major Danish research milieus were compared and Denmark was compared with Norway and Sweden. Number and proportion of articles published in the 200 and 500 most cited journals increased over the years (p
PubMed ID
7502373 View in PubMed
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A bibliometric analysis of tuberculosis research indexed in PubMed, 1997-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91208
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2008 Dec;12(12):1461-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Ramos J M
Padilla S.
Masiá M.
Gutiérrez F.
Author Affiliation
Infectious Diseases Unit, Internal Medicine Service, Hospital General Universitario de Elche, Alicante, Spain. jramosrincon@yahoo.es
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2008 Dec;12(12):1461-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliometrics
PubMed
Research - statistics & numerical data
Tuberculosis
United States
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe a bibliometric review of the literature on tuberculosis (TB) research indexed in PubMed over a 10-year period. METHODS: Medline was used via the PubMed online service of the US National Library of Medicine from 1997 to 2006. The search strategy was: [(tuberculosis) OR (tuberculous) in all fields]. RESULTS: A total of 35 735 references were located. The average annual growth rate was +4.7%. The articles were published in 2874 scientific journals. Sixteen journals contained 25% of the TB journal literature. The main journal was the International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. Western Europe was the most productive region, with 31.1% of the articles. The USA ranked second (21%) and Asia third (19.9%). The USA is the predominant country, followed by India, Japan and the United Kingdom. When normalised by population, the order of prominence is Switzerland, New Zealand and Denmark. Normalised by GDP, Gambia, Malawi and Guinea-Bissau were the most productive countries. Normalised by estimated number of TB cases, Iceland, Switzerland and Norway were in leading positions. CONCLUSIONS: There was increasing research activity in the field of TB during the period 1997-2006. The countries with more estimated cases of TB produced less research in TB than industrialised countries.
PubMed ID
19017458 View in PubMed
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89 records – page 1 of 9.