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Beverage consumption in low income, "milk-friendly" families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150389
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(2):95-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
N Theresa Glanville
Lynn McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(2):95-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Beverages - economics - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply
Humans
Hunger
Infant
Male
Mental Recall
Milk - economics - statistics & numerical data
Poverty
Questionnaires
Abstract
Beverage consumption by poor, lone mother-led, "milk-friendly" families living in Atlantic Canada was characterized over a one-month income cycle.
Beverage intake and food security status were assessed weekly, using a 24-hour dietary recall and the Cornell-Radimer food insecurity questionnaire. Families were classified as "milk friendly" if total consumption of milk was 720 mL on a single day during the month. Beverage intake was assessed using t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc comparisons, and chi-square analysis.
Milk consumption by milk-friendly families (76; total sample, 129) was highest at the time of the month when they had the most money to spend. During all time intervals, mothers consumed the least amount of milk and children aged one to three years consumed the most. Mothers consumed carbonated beverages disproportionately, while children of all ages consumed more fruit juice/drink. Mothers' coffee consumption was profoundly increased when either they or their children were hungry.
The quality of beverage intake by members of low-income households fluctuates in accordance with financial resources available to purchase foods. Mothers' beverage intake is compromised by the degree of food insecurity the family experiences.
PubMed ID
19515273 View in PubMed
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Changes in alcohol consumption patterns following the introduction of credit cards in Ontario liquor stores.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201810
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1999 May;60(3):378-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
S A Macdonald
S L Wells
N. Giesbrecht
P M West
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Addiction Research Foundation Division, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1999 May;60(3):378-82
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - statistics & numerical data
Commerce - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In 1994, regulatory changes were introduced in Ontario, Canada, permitting the purchase of alcoholic beverages with credit cards at government-operated liquor stores. Two objectives of this study were: (1) to compare the characteristics of credit card shoppers with non credit card shoppers at liquor stores, and (2) to assess whether changes occurred in alcohol consumption patterns among shoppers following the introduction of credit cards.
Random digit dialing was used to interview 2,039 telephone participants prior to the introduction of credit cards (Time 1); 1,401 of these subjects were contacted 1 year later (Time 2). Independent sample t tests were used to compare credit card shoppers with shoppers not using credit cards, and paired t tests were performed to assess whether drinking behaviors changed from Time 1 to Time 2.
The credit card shoppers were more likely than the non credit card shoppers to be highly educated (p
PubMed ID
10371266 View in PubMed
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Divergent drinking patterns and factors affecting homemade alcohol consumption (the case of Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287861
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2016 Aug;34:88-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Vadim Radaev
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2016 Aug;34:88-95
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - statistics & numerical data
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Wine
Young Adult
Abstract
Unrecorded homemade alcohol consumption has been less examined in the literature. Previous studies of homemade alcohol in Russia have almost entirely focused upon the use of samogon (moonshine) attributed to the northern style of drinking. No systematic analysis is available regarding the production and consumption of homemade wine. This paper explores the drinking patterns demonstrated by consumers of samogon and homemade wine in Russia. The main factors affecting the consumption of these beverages are investigated.
Data were collected from a 2014 nationwide survey of 14,986 respondents aged 15+ years. Beverage preferences, volume of consumed alcohol, drinking habits, and alcohol availability were the main measures reported. Demographic, socio-economic, spatial, and policy-related factors affecting homemade alcohol consumption are examined using logistic regression.
The percentages of samogon and homemade wine consumers were similar, although a greater volume of samogon in pure alcohol was consumed compared to homemade wine. The groups of samogon and homemade wine consumers showed very little overlap. Unlike homemade wine consumers, samogon drinkers consumed larger amounts of alcohol and were more engaged in frequent and excessive drinking, drinking without meals and drinking in marginal public settings. Gender, education, regional affiliation, and type of residence showed opposite associations with regard to the consumption of samogon and homemade wine. Availability of homemade alcohol in the neighbourhood was the most influential predictor due to respondents' own production, presence of homemade alcohol in friendship networks and at illegal market. The prices of manufactured alcohol and the consumption of homemade alcohol did not show significant relationships.
Consumers of samogon and homemade wine demonstrate contrasting drinking patterns that are largely driven by different factors. Samogon is consumed in a more hazardous manner, whereas homemade wine is consumed in a more moderate and law-abiding way. Illegal commercial samogon should be a special concern for alcohol policy.
PubMed ID
27449330 View in PubMed
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Does minimum pricing reduce alcohol consumption? The experience of a Canadian province.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128783
Source
Addiction. 2012 May;107(5):912-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Tim Stockwell
M Christopher Auld
Jinhui Zhao
Gina Martin
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. timstock@uvic.ca
Source
Addiction. 2012 May;107(5):912-20
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - statistics & numerical data
British Columbia
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Young Adult
Abstract
Minimum alcohol prices in British Columbia have been adjusted intermittently over the past 20 years. The present study estimates impacts of these adjustments on alcohol consumption.
Time-series and longitudinal models of aggregate alcohol consumption with price and other economic data as independent variables.
British Columbia (BC), Canada.
The population of British Columbia, Canada, aged 15 years and over.
Data on alcohol prices and sales for different beverages were provided by the BC Liquor Distribution Branch for 1989-2010. Data on household income were sourced from Statistics Canada.
Longitudinal estimates suggest that a 10% increase in the minimum price of an alcoholic beverage reduced its consumption relative to other beverages by 16.1% (P
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2012 May;107(5):921-222471577
Comment In: Addiction. 2012 May;107(5):922-422471578
PubMed ID
22168350 View in PubMed
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Drinking alcohol surrogates among clients of an alcohol-misuser treatment clinic in Novosibirsk, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146777
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(13):1821-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Natalia Bobrova
Robert West
Darya Malutina
Evgenia Koshkina
Ravil Terkulov
Martin Bobak
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. n.bobrova@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(13):1821-32
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - statistics & numerical data
Alcoholism - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - prevention & control
Abstract
A pilot study was conducted in the Russian city Novosibirsk during 2006-2007 with 40 participants sampled from clients admitted to health services for drinking-related problems to explore surrogates for alcoholic beverage drinking using semistructured interviews. Types of surrogates consumed and reasons for their consumption were investigated. Results revealed that the most prevalent reported surrogate used was industrial spirit. The main reasons for drinking surrogates were the high affordability and physical availability of surrogates combined with the need to relieve severe withdrawal symptoms. The study limitations are described, and suggestions for future research are made.
Notes
Cites: Addiction. 2007 Apr;102(4):544-5317362291
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jun 16;369(9578):2001-917574092
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007 Oct;31(10):1613-2417681034
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 1994 Jul;29(4):357-627986272
Cites: Addiction. 2005 Feb;100(2):146-915679743
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2005 Oct;29(10):1884-816269919
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 1999 Nov-Dec;34(6):824-910659717
PubMed ID
20001282 View in PubMed
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Potential consequences of replacing a retail alcohol monopoly with a private licence system: results from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141095
Source
Addiction. 2010 Dec;105(12):2113-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Thor Norström
Ted Miller
Harold Holder
Esa Osterberg
Mats Ramstedt
Ingeborg Rossow
Tim Stockwell
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. thor.norstrom@sofi.su.se
Source
Addiction. 2010 Dec;105(12):2113-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - mortality - trends
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Automobile Driving - statistics & numerical data
Commerce - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Economic Competition - trends
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Licensure
Male
Models, Theoretical
Privatization
Sick Leave - trends
Social Problems - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the potential effects of replacing the Swedish alcohol retail system with a private licensing system on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm.
Two possible scenarios were analysed: (1) replacing the current alcohol retail monopoly with private licensed stores that specialize in alcohol sales or (2) making all alcohol available in grocery stores. We utilized a multiplicative model that projected effects of changes in a set of key factors including hours of sale, retail prices, promotion and advertising and outlet density. Next, we estimated the effect of the projected consumption increase on a set of harm indicators. Values for the model parameters were obtained from the research literature.
Measures of alcohol-related harm included explicitly alcohol-related mortality, accident mortality, suicide, homicide, assaults, drinking driving and sickness absence.
According to the projections, scenario 1 yields a consumption increase of 17% (1.4 litres/capita), which in turn would cause an additional 770 deaths, 8500 assaults, 2700 drinking driving offences and 4.5 million sick days per year. The corresponding figures for scenario 2 are a consumption increase of 37.4% (3.1 litres/capita) leading to an additional annual toll of 2000 deaths, 20 000 assaults, 6600 drinking driving offences and 11.1 million days of sick leave.
Projections based on the research literature suggest that privatization of the Swedish alcohol retail market would significantly increase alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm.
PubMed ID
20809914 View in PubMed
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Saturday opening of alcohol retail shops in Sweden: an impact analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9703
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 May;64(3):393-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Thor Norström
Ole-Jørgen Skog
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. totto@sofi.su.se
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 May;64(3):393-401
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - statistics & numerical data
Breath Tests
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Change
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Violence - economics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the impact of Saturday opening of alcohol retail shops in Sweden. METHOD: An experimental design was applied. Prior to February 2000, all alcohol monopoly outlets we closed on Saturdays. After this date, stores in an experimental area (six counties) were open on Saturdays. In the control area (seven counties) the shops remained closed. To prevent biases resulting from border trade, the experimental and control areas were separated by a border area (seven counties). The outcome measures included alcohol sales and indicators of assaults and drunken driving. The pre-intervention period covered January 1995-January 2000, and the post-intervention period February 2000-June 2001 (17 months). The data were analyzed on a monthly basis through ARIMA-modeling according to the Box-Jenkins technique. RESULTS: The analysis uncovered a statistically significant increase in alcohol sales of 3.3%. There were no significant changes in any of the assault indicators. There was a statistically significant increase in drunken driving (8.3%) on Saturdays-Sundays; however, further analyses suggested this increase was due mainly to a change in the surveillance strategy of the police. CONCLUSIONS: The Saturday opening of alcohol retail shops seems to have increased consumption but not alcohol-related harm. The absence of a significant effect on harm indicators could signify either that no such effect is present or that the design has insufficient power to uncover effects of the expected magnitude.
PubMed ID
12817829 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.