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Alcohol consumption and bone mineral density in elderly women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122594
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):704-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Isolde Sommer
Arja T Erkkilä
Ritva Järvinen
Jaakko Mursu
Joonas Sirola
Jukka S Jurvelin
Heikki Kröger
Marjo Tuppurainen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. Isolde.Sommer@port.ac.uk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):704-12
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis
Anthropometry
Bone Density
Cohort Studies
Female
Femur Neck - radiography
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Lumbar vertebrae - radiography
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Findings regarding alcohol consumption and bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly women have been inconsistent. The objective of the present study was to explore the association of alcohol intake with BMD in elderly women.
This cohort study included women from the population-based Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention - Fracture Prevention Study (OSTPRE-FPS). Alcohol intake and potential confounders were assessed at baseline and after 3 years of follow-up using a lifestyle questionnaire. In addition, an FFQ was distributed in the third year to measure dietary intake, including alcohol. Women underwent BMD measurements at the femoral neck and lumbar spine at baseline and after 3 years of follow-up.
Kuopio Province, Finland.
Three hundred elderly women (mean age 67·8 years) who provided both BMD measurements and FFQ data.
Alcohol consumption estimated from the FFQ and lifestyle questionnaire was significantly associated with BMD at both measurement sites after adjustment for potential confounders, including lifestyle and dietary factors (P 3 alcoholic drinks/week had significantly higher BMD than abstainers, 12·0 % at the femoral neck and 9·2 % at the lumbar spine. Results based on the lifestyle questionnaire showed higher BMD values for all alcohol-consuming women at the femoral neck and for women drinking 1-3 alcoholic beverages/week at the lumbar spine, compared with non-users.
The results from OSTPRE-FPS suggest that low to moderate alcohol intake may exert protective effects on bone health in elderly women.
PubMed ID
22800300 View in PubMed
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Alcohol content in declared non-to low alcoholic beverages: implications to pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146266
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2010;17(1):e47-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Y Ingrid Goh
Zulfikar Verjee
Gideon Koren
Author Affiliation
Motherisk Program, Division of Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2010;17(1):e47-50
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - analysis
Beer - analysis
Beverages - analysis
Canada
Chromatography, Gas
Ethanol - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Food Labeling
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Wine - analysis
Abstract
Alcohol consumption in pregnancy may result in serious adverse fetal outcome. Non- or low alcoholic wines and beers may be a risk-reduction strategy to help alcohol-dependent individuals to prevent or limit ethanol consumption. The objective of this study was to quantify ethanol concentrations in Canadian beverages claiming to contain no or low alcohol content.
Forty-five different beverages claiming to contain no or low alcohol content in the Canadian market were tested for ethanol concentration using gas chromatography.
Thirteen (29%) of the beverages contained ethanol levels higher than the declared concentration on their label. Six beverages claiming to contain no alcohol were found to contain greater than 1% ethanol.
Pregnant women seeking replacement to alcoholic beverages may be misled by these labels, unknowingly exposing themselves and their unborn babies to ethanol.
PubMed ID
20051610 View in PubMed
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[Alcoholism at the end of 1980-s and beginning of 2010-s].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294852
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2016; 116(6):60-65
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Author
Nemtsov A V
Orlov A V
Author Affiliation
Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry Branch of Serbsky Federal Medical Research Center of Psychiatry and Narcology, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2016; 116(6):60-65
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - history
Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis - classification - history - utilization
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To study the 20-years' clinical alteration and alcoholism basing on the changes in its clinical symptoms and course.
The study included 527 alcoholics with formed alcohol withdrawal syndrome: 181 alcoholics were examined in 1988-1990 (Group 1) and 346 alcoholics in 2011-2012 (Group 2).
In Group 1, vodka consumption dominated at all stages of alcoholism. Group 2 included 172 alcoholics with the domination of vodka consumption and 174 alcoholics with mixed consumption. It was shown that in comparison with Group 1 (1988-1990 patients) patients from Group 2 (2011-2012) had slower and mild development of alcoholism, especially those in the mixed consumption group. The authors suggest that the change of the clinical pattern in Group 2 was due to the change in the composition of consumed alcoholic beverages.
???? ?????????????. ??????? ????????? ??????? ? ??????? ??????????? ?? 20 ???. ???????? ? ??????. ??????????? 527 ??????? ???????????? ?? ?????????????? ??????????? ???????????? ?????????, ?? ??????? 181 ??????? ?????????? ? 1988-1990 ??. ? 346 ??????? - ? 2011-2012 ??. ?????????? ? ??????????. ? ??????, ????????????? ? ????? 1980-?, ???????????? ????? ?? ???? ?????? ???????? ???????????. ? ??????, ????????????? ? ?????? 2010-?, ? ????? ??????? ????? ???????????? ???????????? ????? (172 ????????), ? ?????? ????? (174 ???????) ???? ????????? ???????????. ????????, ??? ? ????????? ? ???????? 20-?????? ???????? ? ???????, ????????????? ? 2011-2012 ??., ?????????? ??????????? ????????? ? ????????? ?????, ???????? ? ?????? ?? ????????? ????????????. ??????? ?????????????, ??? ????????? ??????????? ??????? ? ??????? ?????? 2010-? ????? ??????????? ?????????? ??????? ???????????? ??????????? ????????.
PubMed ID
27456905 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use and pregnancy consensus clinical guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138492
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Aug;32(8 Suppl 3):S1-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
George Carson
Lori Vitale Cox
Joan Crane
Pascal Croteau
Lisa Graves
Sandra Kluka
Gideon Koren
Marie-Jocelyne Martel
Deana Midmer
Irena Nulman
Nancy Poole
Vyta Senikas
Rebecca Wood
Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Aug;32(8 Suppl 3):S1-31
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis
Alcoholism - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Consensus
Counseling
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - etiology - prevention & control
Fetal Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Mass Screening
Patient Education as Topic
Preconception Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - therapy
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Temperance
Abstract
to establish national standards of care for the screening and recording of alcohol use and counselling on alcohol use of women of child-bearing age and pregnant women based on the most up-to-date evidence.
published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library in May 2009 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., pregnancy complications, alcohol drinking, prenatal care) and key words (e.g., pregnancy, alcohol consumption, risk reduction). Results were restricted to literature published in the last five years with the following research designs: systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to May 2010. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment (HTA) and HTA-related agencies, national and international medical specialty societies, clinical practice guideline collections, and clinical trial registries. Each article was screened for relevance and the full text acquired if determined to be relevant. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the members of the Expert Workgroup established by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. The quality of evidence was evaluated and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.
the quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1).
the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.
these consensus guidelines have been endorsed by the Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Quebec; the Canadian Association of Midwives; the Canadian Association of Perinatal, Women's Health and Neonatal Nurses (CAPWHN); the College of Family Physicians of Canada; the Federation of Medical Women of Canada; the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada; and Motherisk. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. There is evidence that alcohol consumption in pregnancy can cause fetal harm. (II-2) There is insufficient evidence regarding fetal safety or harm at low levels of alcohol consumption in pregnancy. (III) 2. There is insufficient evidence to define any threshold for low-level drinking in pregnancy. (III) 3. Abstinence is the prudent choice for a woman who is or might become pregnant. (III) 4. Intensive culture-, gender-, and family-appropriate interventions need to be available and accessible for women with problematic drinking and/or alcohol dependence. (II-2).
1. Universal screening for alcohol consumption should be done periodically for all pregnant women and women of child-bearing age. Ideally, at-risk drinking could be identified before pregnancy, allowing for change. (II-2B) 2. Health care providers should create a safe environment for women to report alcohol consumption. (III-A) 3. The public should be informed that alcohol screening and support for women at risk is part of routine women's health care. (III-A) 4. Health care providers should be aware of the risk factors associated with alcohol use in women of reproductive age. (III-B) 5. Brief interventions are effective and should be provided by health care providers for women with at-risk drinking. (II-2B) 6. If a woman continues to use alcohol during pregnancy, harm reduction/treatment strategies should be encouraged. (II-2B) 7. Pregnant women should be given priority access to withdrawal management and treatment. (III-A) 8. Health care providers should advise women that low-level consumption of alcohol in early pregnancy is not an indication for termination of pregnancy. (II-2A).
PubMed ID
21172102 View in PubMed
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Altering alcohol price by ethanol content: results from a Swedish tax policy in 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11022
Source
Addiction. 1997 Jul;92(7):859-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
W. Ponicki
H D Holder
P J Gruenewald
A. Romelsjö
Author Affiliation
Prevention Research Center, Berkeley, California 94704, USA.
Source
Addiction. 1997 Jul;92(7):859-70
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - trends
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis - economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Ethanol - analysis
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden
Taxes
Abstract
In July 1992, the Swedish alcohol retail monopoly reset the taxes for alcohol sold in state stores according to absolute alcohol content. This provided a unique opportunity to examine the effects on alcohol sales within the three beverage classes (beer, wine and spirits) in a situation where price is purposely linked to alcohol content. The most notable effects of the taxation change were a substantial compression of the range of prices for spirits and wine and a corresponding expansion of the price spectrum for beer. Consumers appear to have responded to these tax changes by shifting away from beverage brands that became relatively more expensive. These results suggest that alcohol policy strategies to reduce total alcohol consumption should consider the entire price/quality spectrum as well as differences in absolute alcohol per volume across the three alcohol beverage types.
PubMed ID
9293045 View in PubMed
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[Alternative food fortification during Christmas time].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117566
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Dec 3;174(49):3089-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-3-2012
Author
Michael Patrick Achiam
Jakob Burcharth
Hans-Christian Pommergaard
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk Afdeling, Køge Sygehus, Lykkebækvej 1, 4600 Køge, Denmark. achiam@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Dec 3;174(49):3089-91
Date
Dec-3-2012
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis
Denmark
Food, Fortified
Holidays
Humans
Meat products
Proton Pump Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Solanum tuberosum
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage
Abstract
Alcohol consumption is known to increase during Christmas time and excessive alcohol consumption has been proven to be associated with gastrointestinal bleeding and certain vitamin deficiencies. While food fortification is well known and practiced in most countries, food or beverages fortified with medicine has never been practiced on a wider scale, just as alcohol rarely is fortified. In this article it is speculated how alcohol fortified with proton pump inhibitor and vitamin B would effect alcohol-related morbidity.
PubMed ID
23286727 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59663
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Jorhem
G. Haegglund
Author Affiliation
Chemistry Division 2, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Beverages - analysis
Cereals - chemistry
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Meat - analysis
Milk - analysis
Shellfish - analysis
Sweden
Tea - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.
PubMed ID
1542992 View in PubMed
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Assessing the risk of an excess fluoride intake among Swedish children in households with private wells--expanding static single-source methods to a probabilistic multi-exposure-pathway approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256480
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Jul;68:192-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Anna Augustsson
Tobias Berger
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. Electronic address: anna.augustsson@lnu.se.
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Jul;68:192-9
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Drinking Water - chemistry
Dust - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Fluorides - analysis - toxicity
Food analysis
Humans
Models, Theoretical
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Risk assessment
Soil Pollutants - chemistry
Sweden
Toothpastes - chemistry
Water supply
Abstract
It is often assumed that water consumption is the major route of exposure for fluoride and analysis of water fluoride content is the most common approach for ensuring that the daily intake is not too high. In the present study, the risk of excess intake was characterized for children in households with private wells in Kalmar County, Sweden, where the natural geology shows local enrichments in fluorine. By comparing water concentrations with the WHO drinking water guideline (1.5 mg/L), it was found that 24% of the ca. 4800 sampled wells had a concentration above this limit, hence providing a figure for the number of children in the households concerned assessed to be at risk using this straightforward approach. The risk of an excess intake could, alternatively, also be characterized based on a tolerable daily intake (in this case the US EPA RfD of 0.06 mg/kg-day). The exposure to be evaluated was calculated using a probabilistic approach, where the variability in all exposure factors was considered, again for the same study population. The proportion of children assessed to be at risk after exposure from drinking water now increased to 48%, and when the probabilistic model was adjusted to also include other possible exposure pathways; beverages and food, ingestion of toothpaste, oral soil intake and dust inhalation, the number increased to 77%. Firstly, these results show how the risk characterization is affected by the basis of comparison. In this example, both of the reference values used are widely acknowledged. Secondly, it illustrates how much of the total exposure may be overlooked when only focusing on one exposure pathway, and thirdly, it shows the importance of considering the variability in all relevant pathways.
PubMed ID
24747328 View in PubMed
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Available energy from soft drinks: more than the sum of its parts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143754
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Dec;13(12):1997-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Anwar T Merchant
Avnish Tripathi
Farhan Pervaiz
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 800 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. anwar.merchant@post.harvard.edu
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Dec;13(12):1997-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Humans
Nutritive Value
Sweetening Agents - administration & dosage
Abstract
To evaluate the relationship between energy available from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and total energy availability.
Ecological study using food availability data from 1976 to 2007 from the database of the Canadian Socio-Economic Information Management System. The average available total daily energy per capita (kJ (kcal)/d per capita) and percentage of energy from SSB (%E/d per capita) were calculated. A regression analysis was performed with average available total daily energy per capita (kJ (kcal)/d per capita) as the outcome and percentage of energy from SSB as the independent variable (%E/d per capita).
Canada 1976-2007.
None.
Between 1976 and 2007, total available energy increased on average by 669 kJ (160 kcal)/d per capita, and energy from SSB by 155 kJ (37 kcal)/d per capita. Total available energy increased by 434 kJ (104 kcal)/d per capita for a one unit increase in average percentage of energy from SSB.
Total available energy increased as the contribution of energy available from SSB increased. This increase was larger than that explained by energy availability from SSB alone. Reducing energy from soft drinks may contribute to larger reductions in total energy available for consumption.
PubMed ID
20444316 View in PubMed
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Beverage caffeine intakes in young children in Canada and the US.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168912
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006;67(2):96-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Carol A Knight
Ian Knight
Diane C Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Knight International, Chicago, IL, USA.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006;67(2):96-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Caffeine - administration & dosage - analysis
Canada
Carbonated Beverages - analysis
Central Nervous System Stimulants - administration & dosage - analysis
Child, Preschool
Coffee - chemistry
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Tea - chemistry
United States
Abstract
Throughout childhood there is a shift from predominantly milk-based beverage consumption to other types of beverages, including those containing caffeine. Although a variety of health effects in children and adults have been attributed to caffeine, few data exist on caffeine intake in children aged one to five years.
Because beverages provide about 80% of total caffeine consumed in children of this age group, beverage consumption patterns and caffeine intakes were evaluated from two beverage marketing surveys: the 2001 Canadian Facts study and the 1999 United States Share of Intake Panel study.
Considerably fewer Canadian children than American children consume caffeinated beverages (36% versus 56%); Canadian children consume approximately half the amount of caffeine (7 versus 14 mg/day in American children). Differences were largely because of higher intakes of carbonated soft drinks in the US.
Caffeine intakes from caffeinated beverages remain well within safe levels for consumption by young children.
PubMed ID
16759437 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.