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19 records – page 1 of 2.

[Ambient air benz[a]pyrene and cancer morbidity in Kemerovo].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166782
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Jul-Aug;(4):28-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
S A Mun
S A Larin
V V Brailovskii
A F Lodzia
S F Zinchuk
A N Glushkov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Jul-Aug;(4):28-30
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air - analysis
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Benzopyrenes - analysis
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
A statistically significant direct strong correlation was found between the annual average daily concentrations of air benz[a]pyrene and the lung and the gastric cancer morbidity rates in males and females, skin, thyroid, and ovarian cancer in females. The certain interval of the measured concentration of benz[a]pyrene and the recorded morbidity rate was shown to be characteristic of each of the above-mentioned tumors.
PubMed ID
17078289 View in PubMed
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Bladder cancer in the aluminium industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240592
Source
Lancet. 1984 Apr 28;1(8383):947-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-1984
Author
G. Thériault
C. Tremblay
S. Cordier
S. Gingras
Source
Lancet. 1984 Apr 28;1(8383):947-50
Date
Apr-28-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aluminum - poisoning
Benzopyrenes - poisoning
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupations
Quebec
Risk
Smoking
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence of bladder cancer is unusually high in aluminium smelter workers. An epidemiological study showed that workers in Soderberg potrooms are at highest risk for bladder cancer, the adjusted overall relative risk being 2.39 (1.34-4.28). Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, of which benz(a)pyrene (BaP) served as an indicator, seems to be the causative factor. The relative risk was evaluated at 12.38 for workers with 20 or more equivalent years of BaP exposure. Cigarette smoking contributed significantly to the appearance of bladder cancer in the population studied. There is a synergistic effect when cigarette smoking and BaP exposure are combined; the numbers in our population are too small to determine whether this interaction effect is multiplicative or additive. It is concluded that bladder cancer is associated with aluminium smelting (primarily with the Soderberg process).
PubMed ID
6143877 View in PubMed
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[Carcinogenic hazard in the manufacture of technical-grade carbon]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27348
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1980;26(1):63-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
N A Troitskaia
B T Velichkovskii
F M Kogan
A I Kuz'minykh
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1980;26(1):63-7
Date
1980
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Benzopyrenes - analysis
Carbon - adverse effects
Dust - analysis
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Siberia
Time Factors
Abstract
As a result of retrospective studies on cancer mortality among workers engaged in the carbon black industry, it was found that the mortality rate from cancer of the lung, stomach and gastrointestinal tract within this cohort of workers is higher compared with the population of the surrounding district and distant to it.
PubMed ID
7355600 View in PubMed
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Carcinogens in tobacco smoke: benzo[a]pyrene from Canadian cigarettes and cigarette tobacco.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223458
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Jul;82(7):1023-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
M J Kaiserman
W S Rickert
Author Affiliation
Tobacco Products Section, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Jul;82(7):1023-6
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benzopyrenes - analysis
Canada
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Carcinogens - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods - standards
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Nicotine - analysis
Plants, Toxic
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Smoke - analysis
Tars - analysis
Tobacco
Abstract
We evaluated the benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) content in the smoke from 35 brands of Canadian cigarettes and 5 brands of Canadian tobaccos for roll-your-own cigarettes. For the cigarettes, mean values of BaP ranged from 3.36 ng to 28.39 ng per cigarette, roughly in proportion with declared tar values. The relationship between declared tar and yields of BaP, however, does not allow accurate prediction of one from the other. For the tobaccos, mean BaP values ranged from 22.92 ng to 26.27 ng (average, 24.7 ng) per cigarette. The implications of these findings are discussed with respect to overall exposure.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1992 Jan;82(1):107-91536311
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1990 May;80(5):560-42327532
Cites: J Assoc Off Anal Chem. 1985 Sep-Oct;68(5):935-404055640
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1988 Jan-Feb;79(1):S33-93355959
PubMed ID
1609904 View in PubMed
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Compensating lung cancer patients occupationally exposed to coal tar pitch volatiles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212523
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1996 Mar;53(3):160-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
B. Armstrong
G. Thériault
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Department of Occupational Health, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1996 Mar;53(3):160-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum
Benzopyrenes - adverse effects
Causality
Coal Tar - adverse effects
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - economics - epidemiology - etiology
Metallurgy
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Quebec
Smoking - adverse effects
Workers' Compensation
Abstract
To investigate the process of deciding on compensation claims by lung cancer patients exposed occupationally to coal tar pitch volatiles.
For each case of lung cancer the probability that it was caused (probability of causation (PC)) by coal tar pitch volatiles was expressed as an increasing function of cumulative exposure to benzo-a-pyrene-years. This was assessed from several exposure-response models fitted to data from a large epidemiological study of aluminum production workers. For some models, PC depended also on the smoking habit of the cancer patient.
Estimation of relative risk by exposure group indicated that over 50% of lung cancers were attributable to coal tar pitch volatiles (PC > 50%) at exposures above 100 micrograms/m3-years benzo(a)pyrene. A linear relative risk model indicated that 50% PC was first achieved at 342.2 micrograms/m3-years benzo(a)pyrene, or 190.1 micrograms/m3-years benzo(a)pyrene according to the upper 95% confidence limit for risk increment. Corresponding figures for a power curve model were 210.3 and 45.9. With these five figures as compensation criteria compensation would have resulted in 31.4%, 2.7%, 19.2%, 15.7%, and 39.2% of cancers studied, compared with an estimated total proportion of cancers studied attributable to coal tar pitch volatiles of 15%-26%. If risks due to coal tar pitch volatiles and smoking multiply, PC does not depend on the amount smoked. If the two risks are additive, however, PC depends on the amount smoked according to a formula, with the figures mentioned applying to an average smoking history (24.4 pack-years).
Because of its simplicity and because it falls within the range of criteria based on several more sophisticated approaches, we prefer the criterion of 100 micrograms/m3-years, based on the relative risks by exposure group. However, the compensation board of the Canadian province of Quebec, on consideration of these alternatives, has proposed as a criterion that the upper 95% confidence limit of PC for the patient be at least 50%, assuming an additive relative risk model and allowing for their smoking habit.
Notes
Cites: Health Phys. 1981 Jan;40(1):108-117216772
Cites: J Occup Med. 1985 Mar;27(3):189-983156981
Cites: J Health Polit Policy Law. 1985 Spring;10(1):33-803160761
Cites: Risk Anal. 1986 Sep;6(3):345-573602505
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Jul;128(1):1-93381817
Cites: J Occup Med. 1988 Oct;30(10):771-52976422
Cites: Epidemiology. 1994 Jan;5(1):57-658117783
Cites: Biometrics. 1989 Dec;45(4):1125-382611320
Cites: Stat Med. 1991 Jan;10(1):79-932006358
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1992;22(4):573-901442790
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Jun 1;148(11):1903-58500027
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Feb 1;139(3):250-628116600
Cites: Stat Med. 1989 Jul;8(7):845-592772444
PubMed ID
8704856 View in PubMed
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Diesel exhaust - an occupational carcinogen?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246534
Source
J Occup Med. 1980 Jan;22(1):41-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1980
Author
M B Schenker
Source
J Occup Med. 1980 Jan;22(1):41-6
Date
Jan-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benzopyrenes - poisoning
Carcinogens, Environmental
Finland
Fuel Oils
Humans
London
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Petroleum
Polycyclic Compounds - poisoning
Railroads
United States
Vehicle Emissions - poisoning
Abstract
The existence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the particulate phase of diesel engine exhaust has raised concern about a carcinogenic effect in workers exposed to exhaust from diesel engines. Some of the PAH are carcinogenic following inhalation by experimental animals and are associated with excess cancer mortality in some occupational exposures. Studies of occupational exposure to diesel exhaust show concentrations of PAH are above ambient levels but below the very high levels in occupations with demonstrated excess cancer mortality. A critical review of the epidemiologic evidence on the carcinogenicity of workplace exposure to diesel engine exhaust is suggestive of a carcinogenic effect but the existing data are sparse and contradictory. Further epidemiologic studies of this question are needed.
PubMed ID
6153403 View in PubMed
Less detail

Gastric cancer and diet. A pilot study on dietary habits in two districts differing markedly in respect of mortality from gastric cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28735
Source
Br J Cancer. 1967 Jun;21(2):270-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1967

19 records – page 1 of 2.