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A 2-dose regimen of a recombinant hepatitis B vaccine with the immune stimulant AS04 compared with the standard 3-dose regimen of Engerix-B in healthy young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56626
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(8):610-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
K. Levie
I. Gjorup
P. Skinhøj
M. Stoffel
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(8):610-4
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Belgium
Comparative Study
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens - analysis
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Immunity - physiology
Immunization - methods
Immunization Schedule
Male
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Single-Blind Method
Vaccines, Synthetic - administration & dosage
Abstract
An open-label randomized study was undertaken to compare a 2-dose regimen (Months 0 and 6) of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine formulated with a novel adjuvant (HBsAg/AS04) with a standard 3-dose regimen (Months 0, 1 and 6) of licensed recombinant HBsAg vaccine in terms of immunogenicity and reactogenicity when administered to healthy subjects aged between 15 and 40 y. At 1 and 6 months after the full vaccination course there was a 100% seroprotection rate (anti-HBs > or = 10 mIU/ml) with the HBsAg/AS04 vaccine, compared with a 99% response rate with the licensed vaccine. The corresponding geometric mean titres were significantly higher for the novel vaccine compared to the standard vaccine: 15,468 and 2,745 mIU/ml at Months 7 and 12 vs. 6,274 and 1,883 mIU/ml, respectively. There was a higher prevalence of local symptoms with the adjuvant vaccine (90% of doses) than with the standard vaccine (48% of doses). However, these symptoms (pain, swelling and redness) were predominantly of mild-to-moderate intensity and resolved rapidly without treatment. A 2-dose regimen of the new HBsAg/AS04 adjuvant vaccine therefore compared favourably to the standard regimen in healthy young adults. It is anticipated that the simplified vaccination schedule may improve compliance and reduce costs.
PubMed ID
12238579 View in PubMed
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[ADOPT study: which first-line glucose-lowering oral medication in type 2 diabetes?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164781
Source
Rev Med Liege. 2007 Jan;62(1):48-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
A J Scheen
Author Affiliation
Université de Liège, Belgique.
Source
Rev Med Liege. 2007 Jan;62(1):48-52
Date
Jan-2007
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Belgium
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - economics
Double-Blind Method
European Union
Glyburide - therapeutic use
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Metformin - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Thiazolidinediones - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
ADOPT ("A Diabetes Outcome Progression Trial") is a double-blind, controlled clinical trial that aims at assessing the efficacy of rosiglitazone, as compared to metformin or glibenclamide, in maintaining long-term glycaemic control in patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes. It randomized 4,360 patients who were followed for a median of 4.0 years. The cumulative incidence of monotherapy failure (defined as a confirmed level of fasting plasma glucose level of more than 180 mg/dl) averaged at 5 years 15% with rosiglitazone, 21% with metformin, and 34% with glibenclamide. This represents a risk reduction for rosiglitazone of 32% as compared to metformin and 63% as compared to glibenclamide (P
PubMed ID
17343130 View in PubMed
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[AIDS and drug addicts in the view of an epidemiologist]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8724
Source
AIDS Forsch. 1987 Jun;(6):323-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987
Author
B. Velimirovic
Source
AIDS Forsch. 1987 Jun;(6):323-34
Date
Jun-1987
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Asia
Asia, Western
Austria
Behavior
Belgium
Denmark
Developed Countries
Disease
English Abstract
Europe
Germany, West
Great Britain
Greece
HIV Infections
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Malta
Netherlands
Norway
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Portugal
Scandinavia
Sexual Behavior
Social Problems
Spain
Substance-Related Disorders
Sweden
Switzerland
Therapeutics
Virus Diseases
Abstract
Data from 12 different European countries show a rapid increase in HIV antibody positivity among drug users or a high degree of contamination already reached wherever studies have been made. Until 31 December 1986, 698 (18%) of AIDS cases were among drug users, of which 600 (15%) of AIDS cases were solely drug users, and 98 (3%) were in addition homosexual or bisexual. A further increase is expected. Because of the epidemiological importance for transmission to the heterosexual population, this problem has become a focus of attention. Drug abusing prostitutes constitute a major source of infection for the heterosexual population and newborns. The increase in the number of AIDS cases in 1986 among male drug abusers was 98 - that is up 61% compared to previous years; among women, the increase was 56%. The 3 main approaches to solution of this problem, i.e. interdiction of the drug trade, availability of sterile needles, and an education program have not proven as successful as anticipated. Relevant indications of the progress of infection in society can only be obtained by systematic observation of conversion rates in differential subgroups, i.e. drug abusers, newly incarcerated drug abusers, male and female prostitutes who use drugs, and individuals newly reporting for treatment. Separation of HIV antibody positives and negatives in therapeutic communities which are not drug free is recommended for epidemiological purposes in view of the developments to date. Nor should forced segregation of the infected from noninfected be dismissed out of hand.
PubMed ID
12281241 View in PubMed
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Alloscardovia omnicolens gen. nov., sp. nov., from human clinical samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162515
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2007 Jul;57(Pt 7):1442-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Geert Huys
Marc Vancanneyt
Klaas D'Haene
Enevold Falsen
Georges Wauters
Peter Vandamme
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Microbiology, Ghent University, K. L. Ledeganckstraat 35, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. geert.huys@UGent.be
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2007 Jul;57(Pt 7):1442-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Aerobiosis
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Base Composition
Belgium
Chaperonin 60 - genetics
Cluster analysis
DNA Fingerprinting
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal - chemistry - genetics
Fermentation
Genes, rRNA
Genotype
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - microbiology
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Norway
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA, Bacterial - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid
Sweden
Abstract
The taxonomic position of 12 isolates tentatively assigned to the genus Bifidobacterium on the basis of a limited phenotypic characterization was examined. The isolates were collected between 1978 and 2005 in Belgium, Sweden and Norway, and originated from various human clinical samples, including urine, blood, urethra, oral cavity, tonsil, and abscesses of lung and aortic valve. On the basis of band number and clustering analysis, repetitive DNA element-based PCR fingerprinting using the BOXA1R and (GTG)(5) primers indicated that the clinical isolates represented a taxon probably not belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities revealed that the isolates were most closely affiliated to Parascardovia denticolens LMG 18312(T) (93.0-93.2 %), Scardovia inopinata LMG 18313(T) (92.9-93.1 %) and other members of the Bifidobacteriaceae, indicating that the isolates belong to a novel genus within that family. This observation was further substantiated by the results of partial sequencing of the heat-shock protein 60 gene (hsp60) and determination of the DNA G+C contents (47.3-48.3 mol%). Members of the novel taxon can be phenotypically distinguished from S. inopinata, P. denticolens and Gardnerella vaginalis by the ability to grow on agar under aerobic conditions and on the basis of positive reactions for acid production from L-arabinose, raffinose, salicin and D-xylose. Unambiguous phenotypic differentiation from Aeriscardovia aeriphila and Bifidobacterium species may be difficult, so phenotypic analyses should be complemented by molecular methods. The values for DNA-DNA binding among four members of the novel genus were in the range of 89-100 %, indicating that the strains should be considered as a single novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Alloscardovia omnicolens gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Alloscardovia omnicolens is CCUG 31649(T) (=LMG 23792(T)).
PubMed ID
17625172 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of diarrhoeic shellfish poisoning in Antwerp, Belgium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31065
Source
Euro Surveill. 2002 Oct;7(10):138-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
K. De Schrijver
I. Maes
L. De Man
J. Michelet
Author Affiliation
Gezondheidsinspectie Copernicuslaan 1 Antwerpen, Belgium.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2002 Oct;7(10):138-41
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Belgium - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Diarrhea - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Feces - microbiology
Food Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Okadaic Acid - analysis
Protozoan Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Shellfish - microbiology - poisoning
Abstract
In Antwerp, Belgium, 403 cases of diarrhoeic shellfish poisoning were reported after consumption of blue mussels. Symptoms included diarrhoea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and nausea. The analysis of faecal specimens from patients allowed diagnosis exclusions for bacteria and viruses. Mouse-assays revealed the presence of biotoxins specific of dinoflagellates, which were identified and quantified by LC-MS. The mussels were imported from Denmark, and were part of a batch presenting high concentrations of okadaic acid above the regulatory limits.
PubMed ID
12631993 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prescribing in relation to diagnoses and consultation rates in Belgium, the Netherlands and Sweden: use of European quality indicators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285373
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2017 Mar;35(1):10-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Mia Tyrstrup
Alike van der Velden
Sven Engstrom
Geert Goderis
Sigvard Molstad
Theo Verheij
Samuel Coenen
Niels Adriaenssens
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2017 Mar;35(1):10-18
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Belgium
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Otitis media
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Primary Health Care
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Referral and Consultation
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Urinary Tract Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the quality of antibiotic prescribing in primary care in Belgium, the Netherlands and Sweden using European disease-specific antibiotic prescribing quality indicators (APQI) and taking into account the threshold to consult and national guidelines.
A retrospective observational database study.
Routine primary health care registration networks in Belgium, the Netherlands and Sweden.
All consultations for one of seven acute infections [upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), sinusitis, tonsillitis, otitis media, bronchitis, pneumonia and cystitis] and the antibiotic prescriptions in 2012 corresponding to these diagnoses.
Consultation incidences for these diagnoses and APQI values (a) the percentages of patients receiving an antibiotic per diagnosis, (b) the percentages prescribed first-choice antibiotics and (c) the percentages prescribed quinolones.
The consultation incidence for respiratory tract infection was much higher in Belgium than in the Netherlands and Sweden. Most of the prescribing percentage indicators (a) were outside the recommended ranges, with Belgium deviating the most for URTI and bronchitis, Sweden for tonsillitis and the Netherlands for cystitis. The Netherlands and Sweden prescribed the recommended antibiotics (b) to a higher degree and the prescribing of quinolones exceeded the proposed range for most diagnoses (c) in Belgium. The interpretation of APQI was found to be dependent on the consultation incidences. High consultation incidences were associated with high antibiotic prescription rates. Taking into account the recommended treatments from national guidelines improved the results of the APQI values for sinusitis in the Netherlands and cystitis in Sweden.
Quality assessment using European disease-specific APQI was feasible and their inter-country comparison can identify opportunities for quality improvement. Their interpretation, however, should take consultation incidences and national guidelines into account. Differences in registration quality might limit the comparison of diagnosis-linked data between countries, especially for conditions such as cystitis where patients do not always see a clinician before treatment. Key points The large variation in antibiotic use between European countries points towards quality differences in prescribing in primary care. ? The European disease-specific antibiotic prescribing quality indicators (APQI) provide insight into antibiotic prescribing, but need further development, taking into account consultation incidences and country-specific guidelines. ? The incidence of consultations for respiratory tract infections was almost twice as high in Belgium compared to the Netherlands and Sweden. ? Comparison between countries of diagnosis-linked data were complicated by differences in data collection, especially for urinary tract infections.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28277045 View in PubMed
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Anticipatory reproduction and population growth in seed predators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79335
Source
Science. 2006 Dec 22;314(5807):1928-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-22-2006
Author
Boutin Stan
Wauters Lucas A
McAdam Andrew G
Humphries Murray M
Tosi Guido
Dhondt André A
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9, Canada. stan.boutin@ualberta.ca
Source
Science. 2006 Dec 22;314(5807):1928-30
Date
Dec-22-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Belgium
Cues
Feeding Behavior
Female
Italy
Litter Size
Male
Population Growth
Reproduction
Sciuridae - physiology
Seasons
Seeds - growth & development
Trees
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Mast seeding, the intermittent, synchronous production of large seed crops by a population of plants, is a well-known example of resource pulses that create lagged responses in successive trophic levels of ecological communities. These lags arise because seed predators are thought capable of increasing reproduction and population size only after the resource pulse is available for consumption. The resulting satiation of predators is a widely cited explanation for the evolution of masting. Our study shows that both American and Eurasian tree squirrels anticipate resource pulses and increase reproductive output before a masting event, thereby increasing population size in synchrony with the resource pulse and eliminating the population lag thought to be universal in resource pulse systems.
PubMed ID
17185600 View in PubMed
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275 records – page 1 of 28.