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1991-1996: Alaska's progress towards the goals of Healthy People 2000

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88238
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 6(1)
Publication Type
Report
Date
Feb-1998
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 6(1)
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Behavioral risk factors
Cholesterol screening
Cigarette smoking
Diabetes
Fruit and vegetable consumption
Heart disease
Inflluenza amd pneumonia immunizations
Mammography and clinical breast exams
Overweight
Pap tests
Physical activity
Proctoscopic exams
Safety belt use
Abstract
The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services implemented the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1990 incooperation with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The system gathers information about the health-related lifestyle choices of Alaskan adults related to leading causes of death such as heart disease, cancer and injury. The program is part of an ongoing national data collection system. Results are analyzed each year to improve our understanding of Alaskanhealth habits and to measure progress toward national and state health objectives. This report summarizes survey findings from1991 to 1996 and compares the results to selected national health objectives presented in the Healthy People 2000 publication.
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1994 behavioral risk factor survey highlights

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88229
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 4(1)
Publication Type
Report
Date
May-1996
risk factors. 1994 Behavioral Risk Factor Survey Highlights The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services implemented the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1990. In coopera- tion with the Federal Centers for Disease Control and
  1 document  
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 4(1)
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
122252
Keywords
Alcohol use
Behavioral risk factors
Breast cancer
Cervical cancer
Chronic Disease
Diabetes
Health care coverage
Health checkups
HIV/AIDS
Nutrition
Overweight
Physical activity
Premature death
Sedentary lifestyle
Tobacco use
Abstract
Behavior and lifestyle play an important part in determining ourhealth status and lifespan. Every day Alaskans make lifestyle choices that profoundly affect their health. Although heredity and environment play a part, the leading causes of death in Alaska (heart disease, cancer and unintentional injuries) are closely related to lifestyle factors. Lifestyle and behavioral factors that affect health include such things as diet, exercise, use of alcohol andtobacco, and preventive health practices. Many premature deathsand disabilities could be prevented through better control of thesebehavioral risk factors.
Documents
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1995 behavioral risk factor survey highlights

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88230
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 5(1)
Publication Type
Report
Date
April-1997
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 5(1)
Date
April-1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult immunizations
Alcohol use
Behavioral risk factors
Breast cancer screening
Cervical cancer screening
Cholesterol screening
Chronic Disease
Colorectal cancer screening
Diabetes
Health care coverage
HIV/AIDS
Hypertension
Overweight
Premature death
Safety belt use
Tobacco use
Abstract
Behavior and lifestyle play an important part in determining ourhealth status and lifespan. Every day Alaskans make lifestyle choices that profoundly affect their health. Although heredity and environment play a part, the leading causes of death in Alaska (heart disease, cancer and unintentional injuries) are closely related to lifestyle factors. Lifestyle and behavioral factors that affect health include such things as diet, exercise, use of alcohol andtobacco, and preventive health practices. Many premature deathsand disabilities could be prevented through better control of thesebehavioral risk factors.
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2013 BRFSS Adverse Childhood Experiences among Alaska Native People: executive summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301061
Source
Alaska Epidemiology Center, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. 7 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2013]
by states in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The domains of childhood abuse and household dysfunction covered in the survey are listed in Table 1. Actual questions included in the ACEs Optional Module can be found in Appendix A. In Alaska, the ACEs module was included for
  1 document  
Source
Alaska Epidemiology Center, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. 7 pages.
Date
[2013]
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
290855
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)
Adverse childhood event (ACE)
Documents

2013-ACES-Summary_FINAL-10-16-2014.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
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Alcohol consumption: a different kind of Canadian mosaic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139725
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jul-Aug;101(4):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
Catherine Paradis
Andrée Demers
Elyse Picard
Author Affiliation
Département de sociologie, GRASP, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC. catherine_paradis@yahoo.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jul-Aug;101(4):275-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
To determine the way Canadians consume alcohol beyond drinking amounts and to verify if the drinking act is similar across provinces given that, in Canada, alcohol policies come under provincial jurisdiction.
Subjects were 10,466 current drinkers (5,743 women and 4,723 men) aged 18 to 76 years, who participated in the GENACIS Canada study.
In Canada, there are three main patterns of consuming alcohol. Maritimers tend to drink more per occasion, report more binge drinking and largely prefer beer. In the Prairies, people tend to drink less, to drink less often during a meal and to favour spirits. Finally, drinkers from Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia drink more often, drink wine more often, drink spirits less often, and drink more often during a meal than drinkers from the other provinces. The same patterns are observed in both sexes, although the differences across provinces are less pronounced among women.
Knowledge about these three drinking groups should be used to increase the legitimacy and effectiveness of alcohol policies in general.
PubMed ID
21033531 View in PubMed
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Assessing health-related quality of life in Northern Plains American Indians: prominence of physical activity as a health behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100501
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2010;17(1):25-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Dmitri Poltavski
Jeffrey Holm
Nancy Vogeltanz-Holm
Leander McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of North DakotaGrand Forks, ND 58202-8380, USA. dpoltavski@medicine.nodak.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2010;17(1):25-48
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.) - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
Motor Activity - physiology
New Mexico - epidemiology - ethnology
North Dakota - epidemiology - ethnology
Quality of Life - psychology
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Rural Population
United States - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Associations of behavioral health risks and healthy behaviors with self-reported health-related quality of life measures were investigated in a Northern Plains American Indian sample. Participants were surveyed in person using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. The results showed that regular physical activity was significantly associated with better self-reported overall health, fewer mentally unhealthy and activity limitation days in the past 30 days, and with a greater number of good health days.
PubMed ID
20683822 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular knowledge among urban American Indians and Alaska Natives: first steps in addressing cardiovascular health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129680
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2011;5(3):273-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Angela G Brega
Timothy Noe
Crystal Loudhawk-Hedgepeth
Dakotah M Jim
Bradley Morse
Kelly Moore
Spero M Manson
Author Affiliation
Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Corolado School of Public Health, University of Corolado Denver, USA.
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2011;5(3):273-9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - ethnology
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Colorado - epidemiology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
New Mexico - epidemiology
Risk factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is common among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). Given limited access to health care, urban AI/ANs may be at particular risk. Lack of available data, however, limits our understanding of cardiovascular health in this population.
We conducted a survey to characterize CVD-related knowledge, behavior, and risk of urban AI/ANs. Results related to knowledge are reported.
In collaboration with the Indian clinics in two urban communities, we surveyed 298 AI/ANs.
Respondents recognized approximately half of the symptoms of heart attack and stroke, and were significantly less likely to recognize each symptom than reported in national studies using the same items. General CVD knowledge (e.g., risks of high blood pressure) was stronger, although areas for improvement were noted.
Urban AI/ANs would benefit from efforts to enhance CVD knowledge. These preliminary data are providing the foundation for community-based efforts to address CVD risk among urban AI/ANs.
PubMed ID
22080775 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of American Indian and Alaska native adult caregivers, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90346
Source
Ethn Dis. 2008;18(4):477-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
McGuire Lisa C
Okoro Catherine A
Goins R Turner
Anderson Lynda A
Author Affiliation
Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3724, USA. LMcGuire@cdc.gov
Source
Ethn Dis. 2008;18(4):477-82
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans
Alaska - ethnology
Asian Americans
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Caregivers - psychology
Family
Female
Health status
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We compared characteristics of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adult caregivers (age > or = 18 years) who were caring for an older adult (age > or = 60 years) to those of other ethnic groups. METHODS: Participants (N=20,996) were from the 2000 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Caregivers provided regular care or assistance during the past month to a family member or friend who was > or = 60 years of age. In addition, participants were asked to indicate whom they would call to arrange short- or long-term care in the home for elderly relatives or friends who were no longer able to care for themselves. RESULTS: A total of 16.4% of adults were caregivers to a person who was > or = 60. AI/AN were significantly more likely to report being caregivers than were people who were of Asian descent. Compared to AI/AN caregivers, Hispanic caregivers indicated that if a friend or relative needed short- or long-term care, they were more likely to provide care themselves (29.1% vs 46.6%) and that they were less likely to indicate that they would contact a professional resource (14.5% vs 25.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Family caregivers provide a valuable service in the United States, particularly to chronically ill or disabled older adults. National, state, and local surveys should regularly collect information on caregiving.
Notes
SummaryForPatientsIn: Ethn Dis. 2008 Autumn;18(4):52019157260
PubMed ID
19157253 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.