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99 records – page 1 of 10.

"Becoming the real me": recovering from anorexia nervosa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175454
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2005 Feb;26(2):170-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Mary M H Lamoureux
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
Kelowna Mental Health Centre, Eating Disorders Program, 1340 Ellis Street, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada V1Y 9N1. mary.lamoureux@interiorhealth.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2005 Feb;26(2):170-88
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - psychology - rehabilitation
Attitude to Health
Behavior Therapy - methods
British Columbia
Convalescence - psychology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Narration
Questionnaires
Self Care - psychology
Self Efficacy
Time Factors
Women's health
Abstract
We investigated the process of recovery from anorexia nervosa using grounded theory. Open-ended interviews conducted with 9 women who had recovered from anorexia nervosa revealed that recovery focused on rediscovery and redefinition of the self and included the following: (1) seeing the dangers, (2) inching out of anorexia, (3) tolerating exposure without anorexia, (4) gaining perspective by changing the anorexia mindset, and (5) discovering and reclaiming self as "good enough." The process of recovery described in this study may provide a useful framework for helping women understand their own process of recovery efforts. The findings also support therapies that foster therapeutic alliance, acknowledge readiness for change, and promote a senses of autonomy.
PubMed ID
15804915 View in PubMed
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Behavioral activation and rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157697
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2008 Mar;46(3):36-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Harold R Wallbridge
Patricia Furer
Carrie Lionberg
Author Affiliation
St. Boniface General Hospital, Manitoba, Canada wallbrid@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2008 Mar;46(3):36-44
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude to Health
Avoidance Learning
Behavior Therapy - methods
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - etiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Goals
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Manitoba
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Patient Care Planning
Problem Solving
Self Care - methods - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Rehabilitation from a mental or physical disorder can become complicated when patients feel overwhelmed by symptoms and unable to make progress. Newer behavioral approaches have been developed that can help these patients. This article describes behavioral activation techniques designed to address depression.
PubMed ID
18416273 View in PubMed
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Beliefs about drinking problems: results from a general population telephone survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169665
Source
Addict Behav. 2007 Jan;32(1):166-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
John A Cunningham
Jan Blomqvist
Joanne Cordingley
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. John_Cunningham@camh.net
Source
Addict Behav. 2007 Jan;32(1):166-9
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - psychology - therapy
Behavior Therapy - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Marriage
Ontario
Sex Factors
Temperance
Abstract
As part of a general population telephone survey (N=3006), respondents were asked their beliefs about alcohol problems. The majority of respondents were skeptical about the possibility of untreated and of moderate drinking recoveries. The predominant conceptions of the nature of alcohol problems were those of a disease or of drug addiction. Beliefs about the need for treatment and abstinence were positively associated with being female, older, and married. Current heavy drinkers were less likely to believe that treatment was needed. Former heavy drinkers were more likely to believe that abstinence was required, as compared to all other respondents.
PubMed ID
16626882 View in PubMed
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Brief Online Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Dysfunctional Worry Related to the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312204
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 2021; 90(3):191-199
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
2021
Author
Tove Wahlund
David Mataix-Cols
Klara Olofsdotter Lauri
Elles de Schipper
Brjánn Ljótsson
Kristina Aspvall
Erik Andersson
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, tove.wahlund@ki.se.
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 2021; 90(3):191-199
Date
2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - therapy
COVID-19 - psychology
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Internet-Based Intervention
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Health Questionnaire
SARS-CoV-2
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Worries about the immediate and long-term consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic may for some individuals develop into pervasive worry that is disproportionate in its intensity or duration and significantly interferes with everyday life.
The aim of this study was to investigate if a brief self-guided, online psychological intervention can reduce the degree of dysfunctional worry related to the COVID-19 pandemic and associated symptoms.
670 adults from the Swedish general population reporting daily uncontrollable worry about CO-VID-19 and its possible consequences (e.g., illness, death, the economy, one's family) were randomised (1:1 ratio) to a 3-week self-guided, online cognitive behavioural intervention targeting dysfunctional COVID-19 worry and associated symptoms, or a waiting list of equal duration. The primary outcome measure was a COVID-19 adapted version of the Generalised Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale administered at baseline and weeks 1-3 (primary endpoint). Follow-up assessments were conducted 1 month after treatment completion. The trial was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04341922) before inclusion of the first participant.
The main pre-specified intention-to-treat analysis indicated significant reductions in COVID-19-related worry for the intervention group compared to the waiting list (ß = 1.14, Z = 9.27, p
Notes
CommentIn: Psychother Psychosom. 2021;90(3):156-159 PMID 33517335
PubMed ID
33212440 View in PubMed
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Can disruptive boys be helped to become competent?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226453
Source
Psychiatry. 1991 May;54(2):148-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991
Author
R E Tremblay
J. McCord
H. Boileau
P. Charlebois
C. Gagnon
M. Le Blanc
S. Larivée
Author Affiliation
School of Psycho-Education, University of Montréal, Canada.
Source
Psychiatry. 1991 May;54(2):148-61
Date
May-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Antisocial Personality Disorder - prevention & control - psychology
Behavior Therapy - methods
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Family Therapy - methods
Fantasy
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parents - education
Personality Development
Quebec
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
Socialization
Television
Abstract
The Montréal Longitudinal Study of Disruptive Boys, an experimental study, was designed to understand boys who were considered disruptive in kindergarten. One part of the study involved assessing effects of a preventive treatment program carried out during the boys' early years in primary school. This paper reports on the outcome of the randomized treatment experiment 3 years after treatments ended. Disruptive boys were randomly allocated to a treated group and two nontreated groups. Treatment consisted of parent training and training of boys for social skills, fantasy play and television viewing. Results suggest that the treatment program had some positive effects. Some of the improvements were not evident immediately after treatment ended.
PubMed ID
1852848 View in PubMed
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Can we help persons with dementia find their way in a new environment?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183760
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2003 Sep;7(5):363-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
K S McGilton
T M Rivera
P. Dawson
Author Affiliation
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute Queen Elizabeth Centre, Toronto, Ontario M6K 2R7, Canada. kathy.mcgilton@utoronto.ca
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2003 Sep;7(5):363-71
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - psychology - therapy
Analysis of Variance
Behavior Therapy - methods
Confusion - prevention & control
Female
Health Facility Environment
Health Services Research
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Intervention Studies
Life Change Events
Location Directories and Signs
Male
Ontario
Patient transfer
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychomotor Agitation - psychology
Spatial Behavior
Abstract
The objective of this study was to conduct a randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of a way-finding intervention on residents' ability to find their way in a new environment. The effect of the intervention on the residents' spatial orientation and agitation were also examined. The study was conducted on four nursing home units in a geriatric center and the final sample consisted of 32 residents with Alzheimer's disease (17 in the treatment group and 15 in the control group). The intervention consisted of the use of a location map and a behavioral training technique, which was provided to residents over the course of a month. Repeated measures analysis of variance and McNemar tests were used to compare the groups in regard to changes in the outcomes over time. Results indicated that the residents' in the treatment group demonstrated an increased ability to find their way to the dining room one week after the intervention. The intervention effect was not sustained three months later.
Notes
Erratum In: Aging Ment Health. 2003 Nov;7(6):following author index
PubMed ID
12959805 View in PubMed
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99 records – page 1 of 10.