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2006 Canadian clinical practice guidelines on the management and prevention of obesity in adults and children [summary].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164223
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2007
Author
David C W Lau
James D Douketis
Katherine M Morrison
Irene M Hramiak
Arya M Sharma
Ehud Ur
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Julia McFarlane Diabetes Research Centre, Diabetes and Endocrine Research Group, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. dcwlau@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Date
Apr-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Bariatric Surgery
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Bulimia Nervosa - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Diet
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Obesity - classification - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Research - trends
Waist-Hip Ratio
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):139118025434
PubMed ID
17420481 View in PubMed
Less detail

Achieving cardiovascular health through continuing interprofessional development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190531
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):I10-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
D M Kaufman
J. McClaran
M. Toombs
S. Beardall
I. Levy
A. Chockalingam
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):I10-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior Therapy - education
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing
Health Behavior
Health Care Coalitions
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Life Style
Patient care team
Patient Participation
Public Health
Abstract
In order to achieve cardiovascular health for all Canadians, the ACHIC (Achieving Cardiovascular Health in Canada) partnership advocates that health promotion for healthy lifestyles be incorporated into practice, and that the consistent messages and professional skills required to motivate patients and the public be acquired through interprofessional education and development. Professional education specialists are essential members of health care promotion teams with expertise to develop educational interventions that impact behaviours of health professionals and subsequent patient outcomes. Continuing medical education (CME) is in evolution to continuing professional development (CPD), and then to continuing inter-professional development (CID). Providers of health promotion, public health, and health care can work with health educators to complete the cascade of learning, change in practice, and improvement in patient outcomes. The Canadian health care system can empower Canadians to achieve cardiovascular health, the most important health challenge in the 21st century.
PubMed ID
11962121 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adapted Couple Therapy (ACT) for pathological gamblers: a promising avenue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156657
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2008 Sep;24(3):393-409
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Karine Bertrand
Magali Dufour
John Wright
Benoît Lasnier
Author Affiliation
Département des Sciences de santé Communautaire, Service de Toxicomanie, Université de Sherbrooke, Campus de Longueuil, 1111, rue St-Charles Ouest, Tour Ouest, Bureau 500, Longueuil, QC, Canada J4K 5G4. karine.bertrand@usherbrooke.ca
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2008 Sep;24(3):393-409
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior Therapy - organization & administration
Behavior, Addictive - prevention & control - therapy
Counseling - organization & administration
Couples Therapy - organization & administration
Female
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Play Therapy - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Recurrence - prevention & control
Spouses
Abstract
The study of the effectiveness of treatment for pathological gambling constitutes a field that is still largely unexplored. To date, the models assessed primarily target the individual and include little or no involvement of the family circle. Yet, the deleterious effects of gambling on loved ones and especially spouses are well recognized. Further, the addition of a couple modality to individual treatment has been shown to be effective on many levels in the treatment of substances use disorders. This article therefore proposes a critical review of (1) the literature providing a better understanding of the complex interactions between the couple relationship and pathological gambling, (2) studies on the effects of couple therapies on gamblers and their partners. We then present the therapeutic model developed by our team of clinician-researchers in collaboration with actors from Québec clinical settings: Adapted Couple Therapy (ACT) for pathological gamblers. In the Québec context, this model will serve as a complement to an individual cognitive-behavioral treatment model that has been proven effective and is employed throughout the Canadian province. The assessment of couple therapies could reveal avenues of solutions to better assist pathological gamblers who tend to drop-out of treatment and relapse.
PubMed ID
18560999 View in PubMed
Less detail

The addition of social support to a community-based large-group behavioral smoking cessation intervention: improved cessation rates and gender differences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188900
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Jul-Aug;27(4):547-59
Publication Type
Article
Author
Linda E Carlson
Eileen Goodey
Marlene Hahn Bennett
Paul Taenzer
Jan Koopmans
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. lindacar@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Jul-Aug;27(4):547-59
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior Therapy
Canada
Community Mental Health Services
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine the effects on cessation rates of adding a partner support group component to a large-group community-based behavioral smoking cessation program.
During the past eight smoking cessation programs at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, separate support group sessions were offered for support persons of prospective quitters. Six hundred smokers brought 156 support people with them to the groups. Cessation rates were calculated at 3, 6, and 12 months postquit.
Those smokers who had support people attending at least one of the support group sessions had higher cessation rates at 3, 6, and 12 months (56%, 46%, and 43%) compared to those without a support person in attendance (36%, 35%, 32%). This effect was especially strong for men, with 3-, 6-, and 12-month cessation rates for those with support of 58%, 54%, and 56%, compared to 52%, 41%, and 36% in the women with support. For men without a support person, the rates were 34%, 35%, and 33%, compared to 38%, 35%, and 31% in women without support. This indicates that although support was initially effective for women, it had no effect on sustained abstinence.
The addition of a support person group to a large-group behavioral smoking cessation program was effective in improving 3-month cessation rates in both men and women, but over 1-year of follow-up support was only associated with greater sustained abstinence in men.
PubMed ID
12188591 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adoption of the children's obesity clinic's treatment (TCOCT) protocol into another Danish pediatric obesity treatment clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269068
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2015;15:13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sebastian W Most
Birgitte Højgaard
Grete Teilmann
Jesper Andersen
Mette Valentiner
Michael Gamborg
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2015;15:13
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Protocols
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Parenting
Pediatric Obesity - psychology - therapy
Professional-Family Relations
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Social Class
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Treating severe childhood obesity has proven difficult with inconsistent treatment results. This study reports the results of the implementation of a childhood obesity chronic care treatment protocol.
Patients aged 5 to 18 years with a body mass index (BMI) above the 99th percentile for sex and age were eligible for inclusion. At baseline patients' height, weight, and tanner stages were measured, as well as parents' socioeconomic status (SES) and family structure. Parental weight and height were self-reported. An individualised treatment plan including numerous advices was developed in collaboration with the patient and the family. Patients' height and weight were measured at subsequent visits. There were no exclusion criteria.
Three-hundred-thirteen (141 boys) were seen in the clinic in the period of February 2010 to March 2013. At inclusion, the median age of patients was 11.1 years and the median BMI standard deviation score (SDS) was 3.24 in boys and 2.85 in girls. After 1 year of treatment, the mean BMI SDS difference was -0.30 (95% CI: -0.39; -0.21, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
25884714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alarm treatment: analyses of response and relapse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33072
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol Suppl. 1999;202:73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
I N Jensen
G. Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Urinvejskirurgisk Afdeling K, Skejby Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol Suppl. 1999;202:73-5
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Behavior Therapy - instrumentation
Child
Enuresis - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Recurrence
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
With focus on relapse, this article reports the results of treating nocturnal enuresis (NE) with an alarm. The frequency of wet nights/week was used as an indicator for the patients' predisposition for alarm treatment and thus the efficiency of the alarm. This article concludes that patients with the highest frequency of NE will obtain the best results when treated with an alarm. Furthermore, these patients find themselves in a better situation than children with lower frequency NE receiving the same treatment.
PubMed ID
10573801 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial (ADAPT): a randomized theory-based efficacy trial for adults with type 2 diabetes--rationale, design, recruitment, evaluation, and dissemination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146122
Source
Trials. 2010;11:4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Kerry S Courneya
Ronald J Sigal
Jeffrey A Johnson
Nicholas Birkett
David Lau
Kim Raine
Steven T Johnson
Nandini Karunamuni
Author Affiliation
School of Education, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW Australia. ron.plotnikoff@newcastle.edu.au
Source
Trials. 2010;11:4
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - instrumentation
Alberta
Behavior Therapy
Biological Markers - blood
Counseling
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - psychology - therapy
Exercise Therapy - methods
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Selection
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Telephone
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The primary aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three physical activity (PA) behavioural intervention strategies in a sample of adults with type 2 diabetes.
Participants (N = 287) were randomly assigned to one of three groups consisting of the following intervention strategies: (1) standard printed PA educational materials provided by the Canadian Diabetes Association [i.e., Group 1/control group)]; (2) standard printed PA educational materials as in Group 1, pedometers, a log book and printed PA information matched to individuals' PA stage of readiness provided every 3 months (i.e., Group 2); and (3) PA telephone counseling protocol matched to PA stage of readiness and tailored to personal characteristics, in addition to the materials provided in Groups 1 and 2 (i.e., Group 3). PA behaviour measured by the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire and related social-cognitive measures were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18-months (i.e., 6-month follow-up). Clinical (biomarkers) and health-related quality of life assessments were conducted at baseline, 12-months, and 18-months. Linear Mixed Model (LMM) analyses will be used to examine time-dependent changes from baseline across study time points for Groups 2 and 3 relative to Group 1.
ADAPT will determine whether tailored but low-cost interventions can lead to sustainable increases in PA behaviours. The results may have implications for practitioners in designing and implementing theory-based physical activity promotion programs for this population.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00221234.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20067626 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcoholism: beliefs and attitudes among Canadian alcoholism treatment practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195178
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Mar;46(2):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
E E Meza
J A Cunningham
N. el-Guebaly
L. Couper
Author Affiliation
Addiction Research Foundation Division, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Mar;46(2):167-72
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Deterrents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Behavior Therapy
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Humans
Patient care team
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
To explore differences in views concerning adjunctive medications and theoretical orientation among Canadian practitioners from different professional backgrounds who treat alcoholism.
A survey of clinicians from different disciplines was conducted by mail. The response rate was 56%: 95 drug and alcohol counsellors, 46 social workers, 81 nonpsychiatrist addiction physicians, and 74 addiction psychiatrists. The number of items in the questionnaire was reduced using principal component analysis. Group differences were explored using analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction and Scheffé's posthoc comparisons.
Physicians and nonphysicians differed in their views on the utility of medications in treating alcohol problems, the disease concept of alcohol problems, and the classification of alcohol abuse or dependence as psychiatric conditions. No group differences emerged on views regarding cognitive-behavioural treatment, pharmacological-only interventions, combined treatment, and recovery without treatment. Psychopathology in the alcoholic was significantly more likely to be considered as secondary to the use of alcohol by nonpsychiatrist physicians. Nonphysician practitioners viewed alcoholic behaviour as self-medication.
Groups differed on questionnaire items concerning medication use and the disease concept of alcoholism. Agreement on several areas may facilitate bridging the gap across disciplines. The implications of these results are discussed.
PubMed ID
11280087 View in PubMed
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[Ambulatory long-term cardiac rehabilitation--one year results]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49890
Source
Gesundheitswesen. 2001 Mar;63 Suppl 1:S39-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
U. Tegtbur
H. Machold
U. Brinkmeier
M. Busse
Author Affiliation
Sportmedizinisches Zentrum, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover. Tegtbur.Uwe@mh-hannover.de
Source
Gesundheitswesen. 2001 Mar;63 Suppl 1:S39-42
Date
Mar-2001
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ambulatory Care - economics
Behavior Therapy - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
English Abstract
Exercise
Female
Germany
Humans
Long-Term Care - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - economics - rehabilitation
Patient compliance
Abstract
After acute hospital therapy of myocardial infarction or bypass surgery the patient in Germany will be treated using an inpatient rehabilitation programme for 3-4 weeks. One year later only 10% of them are still active in outpatients groups. In our study 61 cardiac patients performed an one-year outpatient rehabilitation (instead of 4 weeks inpatient) programme with intense supervised exercise and behaviour therapy. The money input per patient was the same for the usual care 4 weeks inpatient (6000 DM) as for 1 year outpatient rehabilitation (5800 DM). The exercise capacity per heart rate-blood pressure-product was increased by 43% (p > 0.01) after 12 months. The maximum exercise capacity was reached in the 57th week. Without increased medical treatment, cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were reduced after 12 months by 3.9% down to 195 +/- 25 mg/dl or by 6.6% down to 122 +/- 21 mg/dl, respectively (n.s.). HDL-cholesterol increased by 2.8% to 48 +/- 8 mg/dl (n.s.). This study shows results similar to outpatient rehabilitation programmes in the United States or in Sweden. The long intervention time and the intensity are main factors for the success of cardiac rehabilitation and patient health. Financial resources should primarily be concentrated on long-term outpatient rehabilitation programmes.
PubMed ID
11329918 View in PubMed
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Analysis of adolescents' beliefs about the outcome of using dental floss and drinking non-sugared mineral water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72879
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;24(3):211-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
A N Astrøm
J. Rise
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;24(3):211-6
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Behavior Therapy
Beverages
Comparative Study
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dental Devices, Home Care
Dentist-Patient Relations
Fear
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Mineral Waters
Motivation
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parent-Child Relations
Persuasive Communication
Probability
Sensation
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Abstract
Using an expectancy value approach, personal and normative beliefs about the outcome of using dental floss and drinking non-sugared mineral water were studied in a sample of 970 15-year-old adolescents in the county of Hordaland in Norway. The data stem from a survey performed in October 1992. A detailed analysis of these beliefs provides information about which of them should be targeted in a persuasive communication directed at changing behavior. The adolescents evaluated six outcomes of each behavior in terms of how much they wanted or feared them, and rated the probability of each outcomes happening. The adolescents also rated the probability that four significant referents would approve the performance of each behavior and how much they valued the approval of each referent. Subjects with relatively strong and relatively weak intentions to use dental floss and to drink non-sugared mineral water (intenders and non-intenders) were compared with respect to their scores on each measure. A one-way analysis of variance showed consistent differences between intenders and non-intenders. Intenders were more likely to believe that the specified behaviors would result in positive outcomes and they evaluated these outcomes as more desirable than non-intenders. Intenders believed their referens, in particular dentists and parents, to be more concerned about whether or not to perform the specified behaviors than non-intenders. The most promising candidates for persuasive communication among behavioral beliefs with respect to the specified behaviors appeared to be reduced tooth decay and several non, health beliefs in terms of immediate social and sensory concerns.
PubMed ID
8871022 View in PubMed
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