Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Alcohol law changes and homicide in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9823
Source
Psychol Rep. 2002 Dec;91(3 Pt 1):742
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
David Lester
Author Affiliation
Psychology Program, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona 08240-0195, USA.
Source
Psychol Rep. 2002 Dec;91(3 Pt 1):742
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Beer - supply & distribution
Female
Homicide - trends
Humans
Iceland
Male
Abstract
Homicide rates declined, but not significantly, after the passage of a law in Iceland legalizing the sale of strong beer.
Notes
Comment On: Psychol Rep. 1999 Jun;84(3 Pt 2):115810477936
PubMed ID
12530717 View in PubMed
Less detail

A brief research note concerning nonmedical detoxification rates during the 1978 Manitoba beer and liquor strikes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244131
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 Oct;16(7):1259-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1981

The dynamics of shifts in alcoholic beverage preference: effects of the legalization of beer in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10923
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1998 Jan;59(1):107-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
H. Olafsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Landspítalinn, Department of Psychiatry, The University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1998 Jan;59(1):107-14
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcoholic Beverages - supply & distribution
Beer - supply & distribution
Drug and Narcotic Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Food Preferences
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study is to examine the changes in alcoholic beverage preference and the underlying social and cultural dynamics that followed the legalization of strong beer in Iceland in 1989. METHOD: Data from three nationwide surveys on drinking habits carried out among a random sample of all Icelanders, men and women, 20-69 years old, are analyzed. A questionnaire was mailed to the prospective respondents and in 1988 the response rate was 75.1%, in 1989 it was 73.3% and in 1992 it was 74.7%. RESULTS: Total alcohol consumption peaked the year after strong beer was introduced, but leveled off in the following years as the novelty of the new beverage faded away and real income declined. A shift in beverage preference towards beer took place as soon as it became available. The survey data indicate that almost all sociodemographic groups are moving from the traditional distilled spirits to weaker beverages, beer in particular. The groups contributing most to the current preference for lighter beverages are those living in the capital area, women, individuals aged 30-49 years, people in the academic professions and management, and men belonging to the service professions. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest some important conclusions regarding alcohol policy. The collective behavior of drinkers documented in this study supports the view that the general population is an important target group for alcohol policy measures. Particular attention to specific subgroups of drinkers may be applied as a supplementary measure.
PubMed ID
9498322 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of changing alcohol laws in Iceland on suicide rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10613
Source
Psychol Rep. 1999 Jun;84(3 Pt 2):1158
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
D. Lester
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Suicide, Blackwood, NJ 08012-5356, USA.
Source
Psychol Rep. 1999 Jun;84(3 Pt 2):1158
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - legislation & jurisprudence
Beer - supply & distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Suicide - trends
Abstract
After the legalization of strong beer in 1989 in Iceland, the decrease in consumption of spirits was accompanied by a decrease in the suicide rate.
Notes
Comment In: Psychol Rep. 2002 Dec;91(3 Pt 1):74212530717
PubMed ID
10477936 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effects of beverage type on suicide rate in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129733
Source
Psychiatr Danub. 2011 Dec;23(4):378-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Yury E Razvodovsky
Author Affiliation
Grodno State Medical University, 230009, Grodno, str. Gorky 80, Belarus. razvodovsky@tut.by
Source
Psychiatr Danub. 2011 Dec;23(4):378-83
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Beverages - supply & distribution - toxicity
Beer - supply & distribution - toxicity
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethanol - supply & distribution - toxicity
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Statistics as Topic
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Wine - supply & distribution - toxicity
Abstract
Research evidence has suggested that the consumption of different types of alcoholic beverage may have a differential effect on suicide rate. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between the consumption of different beverage types and suicide rates in Russia.
Age-standardized sex- and age-specific suicide rate for the period 1980-2005 and data on beverage-specific alcohol sale were obtained from the Russian State Statistical Committee. Time-series analytical modeling techniques (ARIMA) were used to examine the relationship between the sale of different alcoholic beverages and suicide rates.
Vodka consumption as measured by sale was significantly associated with both male and female suicide rate. The consumption of beer and wine were not associated with suicide rate. The estimates of the age specific models for men were positive (except for the 75+ age group) and ranging from 0.069 (60-74 age group) to 0.123 (30-44 age group). The estimates for women were positive for the 15-29 age group (0.08), 30-44 age group (0.096) and 45-59 age group (0.057).
These findings suggest that public health efforts should focus on both reducing overall consumption and changing beverage preference away from distilled spirits in order to reduce suicide rate in Russia.
PubMed ID
22075739 View in PubMed
Less detail