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Age, period and cohort effects on time trends in alcohol consumption in the Swedish adult population 1979-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269107
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):319-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Ludwig Kraus
Mimmi Eriksson Tinghög
Annette Lindell
Alexander Pabst
Daniela Piontek
Robin Room
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):319-27
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Effect
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In Sweden, alcohol abstention has increased over the last 20 years and consumption has recently decreased after a peak in 2004. To understand the dynamics of these trends the present study aims at estimating age, period and cohort (APC) effects on trends in alcohol use prevalence as well as overall and beverage-specific volume of drinking over the last three decades.
APC analysis of seven cross-sectional surveys from 1979 to 2011 was conducted using cross-classified random effects models (CCREMs) by gender. The nationally representative samples comprised 77,598 respondents aged 16-80 years. Outcome measures were 30-day prevalence of alcohol use and overall as well as beverage-specific alcohol volume.
Trends in prevalence, overall and beverage-specific volume were significantly affected by APC. The period effects of prevalence and overall volume show a small decline after an increase up to the year 2005. Mean beer and wine volume levelled off after a peak in 2005 and volume of spirits drinking decreased constantly. Predicted alcohol prevalence rates in male cohorts (1945-1985) remained generally at the same level, while they declined in post-World War II female generations. Results point to high overall and beverage-specific consumption among cohorts born in the 1940s, 1950s and 1980s.
High consuming cohorts of the 1940-1950s were key in rising consumption up to 2005. Progression through the life course of these cohorts, a decrease in prevalence and drinking volume in successive cohorts seem to have contributed to the recent downward trend in alcohol use in Sweden.
PubMed ID
25743087 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and cancer of the colon and rectum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11664
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1993 Sep;2(5):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
A. Romelsjö
M. Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Psychiatry, St. Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1993 Sep;2(5):401-8
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer was examined in a population-based case-control study performed in Stockholm in 1986-88. The study included 352 cases of colon cancer, 217 cases of rectal cancer, and 512 controls. Relative risks, with 95% confidence intervals, were calculated for total alcohol intake and for different alcoholic beverages. Total alcohol intake (> or = 30 g 100% ethanol per day) was not associated with colon cancer (relative risk = 0.9, confidence intervals = 0.4-1.8) or rectal cancer (1.0, 0.4-2.1). There was no evidence supporting beverage specificity (for colorectal cancer and > or = 10 g 100% ethanol per day: beer 1.1, 0.6-2.0, wine 1.0, 0.4-2.7, spirits 1.0, 0.6-1.6). The associations did not vary according to gender or site within the large bowel. These analyses were adjusted for year of birth and gender (when appropriate). Further adjustments for diet, body mass or physical activity had little or no influence on the results. The present study does not support the hypothesis that alcohol plays an important role in the aetiology of cancer of the colon and rectum in a population with a relatively low alcohol intake.
PubMed ID
8401175 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and fecundability: prospective Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281352
Source
BMJ. 2016 Aug 31;354:i4262
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-31-2016
Author
Ellen M Mikkelsen
Anders H Riis
Lauren A Wise
Elizabeth E Hatch
Kenneth J Rothman
Heidi T Cueto
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
BMJ. 2016 Aug 31;354:i4262
Date
Aug-31-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Coitus
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fertility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Rate
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
 To investigate to what extent alcohol consumption affects female fecundability.
 Prospective cohort study.
 Denmark, 1 June 2007 to 5 January 2016.
 6120 female Danish residents, aged 21-45 years, in a stable relationship with a male partner, who were trying to conceive and not receiving fertility treatment.
 Alcohol consumption was self reported as beer (330 mL bottles), red or white wine (120 mL glasses), dessert wine (50 mL glasses), and spirits (20 mL) and categorized in standard servings per week (none, 1-3, 4-7, 8-13, and =14). Participants contributed menstrual cycles at risk until the report of pregnancy, start of fertility treatment, loss to follow-up, or end of observation (maximum 12 menstrual cycles). A proportional probability regression model was used to estimate fecundability ratios (cycle specific probability of conception among exposed women divided by that among unexposed women).
 4210 (69%) participants achieved a pregnancy during follow-up. Median alcohol intake was 2.0 (interquartile range 0-3.5) servings per week. Compared with no alcohol consumption, the adjusted fecundability ratios for alcohol consumption of 1-3, 4-7, 8-13, and 14 or more servings per week were 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.91 to 1.03), 1.01 (0.93 to 1.10), 1.01 (0.87 to 1.16) and 0.82 (0.60 to 1.12), respectively. Compared with no alcohol intake, the adjusted fecundability ratios for women who consumed only wine (=3 servings), beer (=3 servings), or spirits (=2 servings) were 1.05 (0.91 to1.21), 0.92 (0.65 to 1.29), and 0.85 (0.61 to 1.17), respectively. The data did not distinguish between regular and binge drinking, which may be important if large amounts of alcohol are consumed during the fertile window.
 Consumption of less than 14 servings of alcohol per week seemed to have no discernible effect on fertility. No appreciable difference in fecundability was observed by level of consumption of beer and wine.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27581754 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality after lifting ban on beer sales in country with state alcohol monopoly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272377
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Aug;25(4):729-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Thorarinn Tyrfingsson
Sigurdur Olafsson
Einar Stefan Bjornsson
Vilhjalmur Rafnsson
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Aug;25(4):729-31
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
End Stage Liver Disease - mortality
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
The objectives were to study alcohol consumption per capita and liver cirrhosis mortality in the population of Iceland.
The Statistic Iceland website supplied alcohol sales figures and death rates.
The alcohol consumption increased 30% during the study period 1982-2009, because of increase in beer and wine, and decrease in spirits consumption. Chronic liver cirrhosis mortality increased significantly for men when comparing the 1982-88 rates (before beer ban was lifted) with the rates for 2003-09.
The findings do not support the suggestion that spirits consumption rather than the total alcohol consumption affect the cirrhosis mortality.
PubMed ID
25085471 View in PubMed
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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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The effect of beverage type on alcoholic psychoses rate in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267940
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 Mar;50(2):200-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Y E Razvodovsky
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 Mar;50(2):200-5
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Psychoses, Alcoholic - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To test the hypothesis of beverage-specific effect in Russia on the incidence rate of alcoholic psychoses (a known indicator of a population's alcohol-related problems).
Time series analytical modeling techniques (ARIMA) were used to examine the relation between the sales of different alcoholic beverages (vodka, wine, beer) and alcoholic psychoses incidence rate between 1970 and 2013.
The analysis suggests that of the three beverages vodka alone was associated with alcoholic psychoses incidence rate. The estimated effect of vodka sales on the alcohol psychoses rate is statistically significant: a 1 l per person per year increase in vodka sales would result in a 23.4% increase in the alcoholic psychoses incidence rate.
The incidence of alcoholic psychoses is more responsive to changes in vodka sales per capita than wine or beer sales.
Notes
Comment In: Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 Sep;50(5):624-525839187
Comment In: Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 Sep;50(5):626-726071593
PubMed ID
25583743 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiology, medical and social features of the addiction to beer and strong alcogol].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138272
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2011;111(11 Pt 2):3-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
R D Iliuk
K V Rybakova
A S Kiselev
E M Krupitskii
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2011;111(11 Pt 2):3-13
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Alcoholics - classification - psychology
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology
Beer - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Ethanol - administration & dosage
Female
Health
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Social Adjustment
Abstract
The comparative study of the addiction to beer and hard liquor was carried out. Despite of the dramatic increase in the beer consumption in the Russian Federation between 1999 and 2009, the incidence and prevalence of alcohol dependence and alcohol psychoses had decreased. The analysis of preference in alcohol consumption revealed that 90.7% of study participants consumed different types of alcohol beverages: beer and hard liquor. Alcohol addiction caused by the consumption of beer or spirits and wine alone was 1.2% and 8.1%, respectively. Our study of case histories demonstrated that alcohol addiction related predominantly to the beer use was associated with the consumption of smaller doses of pure ethanol, less pronounced abstinent syndrome, less frequent complications, such as the convulsive syndrome and alcoholic psychosis, compared to the addiction to hard liquor. The examination of 106 outpatients with alcohol addiction revealed that patients who preferred hard liquor during the last month consumed more alcohol in terms of pure ethanol. Also, the period of hard drinking was longer and patients had more social, legal, and psychological problems as well as somatic and psychopathological disorders. The higher was the consumption of hard liquor, the severe was the course of alcohol addiction. The least number of biopsychosocial problems was noted in patients who consumed only beer.
PubMed ID
22611690 View in PubMed
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Food buying habits of people who buy wine or beer: cross sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171072
Source
BMJ. 2006 Mar 4;332(7540):519-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-2006
Author
Ditte Johansen
Karina Friis
Erik Skovenborg
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Øster Farimagsgade 5 A, DK-1399 Copenhagen K, Denmark.
Source
BMJ. 2006 Mar 4;332(7540):519-22
Date
Mar-4-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Chi-Square Distribution
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Regression Analysis
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate whether people who buy wine buy healthier food items than those who buy beer.
Cross sectional study.
Supermarkets in Denmark. Data Information on number, type of item, and total charge from 3.5 million transactions over a period of six months.
Wine buyers bought more olives, fruit and vegetables, poultry, cooking oil, and low fat cheese, milk, and meat than beer buyers. Beer buyers bought more ready cooked dishes, sugar, cold cuts, chips, pork, butter or margarine, sausages, lamb, and soft drinks than wine buyers.
Wine buyers made more purchases of healthy food items than people who buy beer.
Notes
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ReprintIn: Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Feb 26;169(9):823-617355850
PubMed ID
16428251 View in PubMed
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Impact of a new alcohol policy on homemade alcohol consumption and sales in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269109
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):365-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Vadim Radaev
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):365-72
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Public Policy
Russia - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe the effects of Russian policy since 2006 affecting price and availability on the consumption of recorded and unrecorded alcohol, with specific reference to homemade alcohol, and to investigate other factors affecting homemade alcohol consumption and purchasing.
Consumption and preferred beverage data were collected from RLMS-HSE nationwide panel surveys from 1994 to 2013, with a detailed analysis of 2012 data (18,221 respondents aged 16+ years). Official statistics on manufactured alcohol sales, regional price increase and real disposable income were used.
Homemade distilled spirits (samogon) consumption decreased together with that of recorded and unrecorded manufactured spirits since 2000. The consumption of spirits was partially replaced by the consumption of beer and wine. These trends in alcohol consumption were interrupted in 2008-2013. The interruption was more likely affected by the economic crisis and recession than by the new alcohol policy. Social networks and availability of unrecorded alcohol were more important predictors of homemade alcohol consumption and purchasing than was a recorded alcohol price increase.
Homemade alcohol consumption does not replace the declining market for recorded spirits in Russia. The effects of economic and social factors on homemade alcohol consumption are greater than are the short-term effects of the new alcohol policy. The very recent (2015) reduction of the minimum unit price of vodka may be premature.
PubMed ID
25716114 View in PubMed
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Intake of alcohol may modify the risk for non-melanoma skin cancer: results of a large Danish prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123461
Source
J Invest Dermatol. 2012 Dec;132(12):2718-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Allan Jensen
Fatima Birch-Johansen
Anne B Olesen
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Susanne K Kjær
Author Affiliation
Virus, Lifestyle and Genes, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen O, Denmark. allan@cancer.dk
Source
J Invest Dermatol. 2012 Dec;132(12):2718-26
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Melanosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nevus - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Alcohol has not been linked definitively to non-melanoma skin cancer. We examined whether alcohol intake affects the risks for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) using data on 54,766 persons enrolled in the prospective Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort. Statistical analyses were based on the Cox proportional hazards model. All hazard ratios (HRs) were multivariate adjusted. Adjustment for exposure to UVR was not possible, but all analyses were adjusted for factors related to susceptibility to UVR, including sun sensitivity, degree of freckling, and number of nevi. A total of 2,409 BCC cases and 198 SCC cases were diagnosed within a median follow-up of 11.4 years. Total current alcohol intake was not associated with BCC risk, but beverage-specific analyses showed an increased BCC risk associated with intake of wine (HR=1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.08, current average alcohol intake, per 10 g per day) and spirits (HR=1.11, 95% CI: 1.02-1.21) and a decreased risk with beer (HR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.93-1.00). No convincing associations were found between total alcohol intake and risk for SCC, perhaps because of the limited number of cases. Our findings indicate that alcohol intake may increase the risk for BCC, but the relations seemed to depend on beverage type.
PubMed ID
22696059 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.