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A 32-year longitudinal study of alcohol consumption in Swedish women: Reduced risk of myocardial infarction but increased risk of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275258
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Dominique Hange
Jóhann A Sigurdsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Valter Sundh
Calle Bengtsson
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Beer
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Ethanol - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Neoplasms - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess associations between the intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and the 32-year incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, as well as mortality, in a middle-aged female population.
Prospective study.
Gothenburg, Sweden, population about 430 000.
Representative sample of a general population of women (1462 in total) aged 38 to 60 years in 1968-1969, followed up to the ages of 70 to 92 years in 2000-2001.
Associations between alcohol intake and later risk of mortality and morbidity from myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, studied longitudinally.
During the follow-up period, 185 women developed myocardial infarction, 162 developed stroke, 160 women became diabetic, and 345 developed cancer. Women who drank beer had a 30% lower risk (hazards ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.95) of developing myocardial infarcion and almost half the risk (HR 0.51 CI 0.33-0.80). A significant association between increased risk of death from cancer and high spirits consumption was also shown (hazards ratio [HR] 1.47, CI 1.06-2.05).
Women with moderate consumption of beer had a reduced risk of developing myocardial infarction. High spirits consumption was associated with increased risk of cancer mortality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26194171 View in PubMed
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The 1978 strike at the Norwegian Wine and Spirits Monopoly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12888
Source
Br J Addict. 1983 Mar;78(1):51-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1983

Age, period and cohort effects on time trends in alcohol consumption in the Swedish adult population 1979-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269107
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):319-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Ludwig Kraus
Mimmi Eriksson Tinghög
Annette Lindell
Alexander Pabst
Daniela Piontek
Robin Room
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 May;50(3):319-27
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Effect
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In Sweden, alcohol abstention has increased over the last 20 years and consumption has recently decreased after a peak in 2004. To understand the dynamics of these trends the present study aims at estimating age, period and cohort (APC) effects on trends in alcohol use prevalence as well as overall and beverage-specific volume of drinking over the last three decades.
APC analysis of seven cross-sectional surveys from 1979 to 2011 was conducted using cross-classified random effects models (CCREMs) by gender. The nationally representative samples comprised 77,598 respondents aged 16-80 years. Outcome measures were 30-day prevalence of alcohol use and overall as well as beverage-specific alcohol volume.
Trends in prevalence, overall and beverage-specific volume were significantly affected by APC. The period effects of prevalence and overall volume show a small decline after an increase up to the year 2005. Mean beer and wine volume levelled off after a peak in 2005 and volume of spirits drinking decreased constantly. Predicted alcohol prevalence rates in male cohorts (1945-1985) remained generally at the same level, while they declined in post-World War II female generations. Results point to high overall and beverage-specific consumption among cohorts born in the 1940s, 1950s and 1980s.
High consuming cohorts of the 1940-1950s were key in rising consumption up to 2005. Progression through the life course of these cohorts, a decrease in prevalence and drinking volume in successive cohorts seem to have contributed to the recent downward trend in alcohol use in Sweden.
PubMed ID
25743087 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and cancer of the colon and rectum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11664
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1993 Sep;2(5):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
A. Romelsjö
M. Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Psychiatry, St. Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1993 Sep;2(5):401-8
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer was examined in a population-based case-control study performed in Stockholm in 1986-88. The study included 352 cases of colon cancer, 217 cases of rectal cancer, and 512 controls. Relative risks, with 95% confidence intervals, were calculated for total alcohol intake and for different alcoholic beverages. Total alcohol intake (> or = 30 g 100% ethanol per day) was not associated with colon cancer (relative risk = 0.9, confidence intervals = 0.4-1.8) or rectal cancer (1.0, 0.4-2.1). There was no evidence supporting beverage specificity (for colorectal cancer and > or = 10 g 100% ethanol per day: beer 1.1, 0.6-2.0, wine 1.0, 0.4-2.7, spirits 1.0, 0.6-1.6). The associations did not vary according to gender or site within the large bowel. These analyses were adjusted for year of birth and gender (when appropriate). Further adjustments for diet, body mass or physical activity had little or no influence on the results. The present study does not support the hypothesis that alcohol plays an important role in the aetiology of cancer of the colon and rectum in a population with a relatively low alcohol intake.
PubMed ID
8401175 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and mortality from all causes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9376
Source
Biol Res. 2004;37(2):183-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Serge Renaud
Dominique Lanzmann-Petithory
René Gueguen
Pascale Conard
Author Affiliation
Emile Roux Hospital, Public Assistance of Paris Hospitals France. serge.renaud@erx.ap-hop-paris.fr
Source
Biol Res. 2004;37(2):183-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Beer
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Wine
Abstract
A large number of prospective studies have observed an inverse relationship between a moderate intake of alcohol and coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality. Concerning death from all-causes, results are not unanimous. Alcohol intake was associated with a protection of all-cause mortality in England and USA physicians and the large study of the American Cancer Society. None of these studies separated the effects of different alcoholic beverages. In our prospective studies in France on 35 000 middle-aged men, we observed that only wine at moderate intake, was associated with a protective effect on all-cause mortality. The reason was that in addition to the known effect on cardiovascular diseases, a very moderate intake of wine, protected also from cancer and other causes as confirmed by Gronbaek in Denmark. Our recent results also indicate that the protective effect of a moderate intake of wine on all-cause mortality is observed at all levels of blood pressure and serum cholesterol.
PubMed ID
15455645 View in PubMed
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Alcohol, beer and lung cancer--a meaningful relationship?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12807
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1984 Jun;13(2):240-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
J D Potter
A J McMichael
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1984 Jun;13(2):240-2
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications
Beer - adverse effects
Canada
Denmark
Female
Humans
Ireland
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
United States
Abstract
The epidemiological evidence relating alcohol consumption and lung cancer is reviewed. Four correlation studies have shown a relationship between alcohol, particularly beer, consumption and lung cancer. Beer consumption was a risk factor in one case-control study. Eight out of ten prospective studies show alcoholics and high alcohol consumers to be at greater risk of lung cancer. Not all of the increased risk in these studies is explainable in terms of confounding by tobacco consumption. There is some animal evidence which supports the effects of alcohol on the likelihood of developing lung cancer.
PubMed ID
6376387 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and fecundability: prospective Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281352
Source
BMJ. 2016 Aug 31;354:i4262
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-31-2016
Author
Ellen M Mikkelsen
Anders H Riis
Lauren A Wise
Elizabeth E Hatch
Kenneth J Rothman
Heidi T Cueto
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
BMJ. 2016 Aug 31;354:i4262
Date
Aug-31-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Coitus
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fertility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Rate
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
 To investigate to what extent alcohol consumption affects female fecundability.
 Prospective cohort study.
 Denmark, 1 June 2007 to 5 January 2016.
 6120 female Danish residents, aged 21-45 years, in a stable relationship with a male partner, who were trying to conceive and not receiving fertility treatment.
 Alcohol consumption was self reported as beer (330 mL bottles), red or white wine (120 mL glasses), dessert wine (50 mL glasses), and spirits (20 mL) and categorized in standard servings per week (none, 1-3, 4-7, 8-13, and =14). Participants contributed menstrual cycles at risk until the report of pregnancy, start of fertility treatment, loss to follow-up, or end of observation (maximum 12 menstrual cycles). A proportional probability regression model was used to estimate fecundability ratios (cycle specific probability of conception among exposed women divided by that among unexposed women).
 4210 (69%) participants achieved a pregnancy during follow-up. Median alcohol intake was 2.0 (interquartile range 0-3.5) servings per week. Compared with no alcohol consumption, the adjusted fecundability ratios for alcohol consumption of 1-3, 4-7, 8-13, and 14 or more servings per week were 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.91 to 1.03), 1.01 (0.93 to 1.10), 1.01 (0.87 to 1.16) and 0.82 (0.60 to 1.12), respectively. Compared with no alcohol intake, the adjusted fecundability ratios for women who consumed only wine (=3 servings), beer (=3 servings), or spirits (=2 servings) were 1.05 (0.91 to1.21), 0.92 (0.65 to 1.29), and 0.85 (0.61 to 1.17), respectively. The data did not distinguish between regular and binge drinking, which may be important if large amounts of alcohol are consumed during the fertile window.
 Consumption of less than 14 servings of alcohol per week seemed to have no discernible effect on fertility. No appreciable difference in fecundability was observed by level of consumption of beer and wine.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27581754 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality after lifting ban on beer sales in country with state alcohol monopoly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272377
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Aug;25(4):729-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Thorarinn Tyrfingsson
Sigurdur Olafsson
Einar Stefan Bjornsson
Vilhjalmur Rafnsson
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Aug;25(4):729-31
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
End Stage Liver Disease - mortality
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
The objectives were to study alcohol consumption per capita and liver cirrhosis mortality in the population of Iceland.
The Statistic Iceland website supplied alcohol sales figures and death rates.
The alcohol consumption increased 30% during the study period 1982-2009, because of increase in beer and wine, and decrease in spirits consumption. Chronic liver cirrhosis mortality increased significantly for men when comparing the 1982-88 rates (before beer ban was lifted) with the rates for 2003-09.
The findings do not support the suggestion that spirits consumption rather than the total alcohol consumption affect the cirrhosis mortality.
PubMed ID
25085471 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and risk of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes development in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131295
Source
Diabet Med. 2012 Apr;29(4):441-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
M. Cullmann
A. Hilding
C-G Östenson
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 2012 Apr;29(4):441-52
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Beer - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - chemically induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ethanol - adverse effects
Female
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prediabetic State - chemically induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wine - adverse effects
Abstract
Alcohol is a potential risk factor of Type 2 diabetes. However, more detailed information on effects of alcohol types and early phases of Type 2 diabetes development seems warranted. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of alcohol consumption and specific alcoholic beverages on the risk of developing pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Swedish men and women.
Subjects, who at baseline had normal glucose tolerance (2070 men and 3058 women) or pre-diabetes (70 men and 41 women), aged 35-56 years, were evaluated in this cohort study. Logistic regression was performed to estimate the risk [odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI)] to develop pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes at 8-10 years follow-up, in relation to self-reported alcohol intake at baseline. Adjustment was performed for several risk factors.
Total alcohol consumption and binge drinking increased the risk of pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes in men (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.00-2.03 and OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.11-2.50, respectively), while low consumption decreased diabetes risk in women (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.22-0.79). Men showed higher risk of pre-diabetes with high beer consumption (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.13-3.01) and of Type 2 diabetes with high consumption of spirits (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.27-3.24). Women showed a reduced risk of pre-diabetes with high wine intake (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.43-0.99) and of Type 2 diabetes with medium intake of both wine and spirits (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.88 and OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.31-0.97, respectively), whereas high consumption of spirits increased the pre-diabetes risk(OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.47-3.96).
High alcohol consumption increases the risk of abnormal glucose regulation in men. In women the associations are more complex: decreased risk with low or medium intake and increased risk with high alcohol intake.
PubMed ID
21916972 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption in Lithuanian school-aged children during 1994-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9330
Source
Medicina (Kaunas). 2004;40(11):1117-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Linas Sumskas
Apolinaras Zaborskis
Author Affiliation
Institute for Biomedical Research, Kaunas University of Medicine, Eiveniu 4, 50009 Kaunas, Lithuania. linas@kmu.lt
Source
Medicina (Kaunas). 2004;40(11):1117-23
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer
Child
Comparative Study
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Humans
Lithuania - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Abstract
Alcohol consumption becomes an important social and health problem among youth in many countries. Analysis of data on alcohol consumption behavior from World Health Organization Cross-National Study on Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) is presented in the article. This survey is carried out in majority of European countries including Lithuania. Aim of this study was to analyze features and trends of alcohol consumption among representative sample of 11, 13 and 15-year-old school children and to compare results with international data. METHODS: Patterns and trends of alcohol consumption were analyzed in three cross sectional questionnaire surveys of the representative sample of Lithuanian secondary school student's aged 11, 13 and 15 years in 1994, 1998 and 2002. Respectively, 5428, 4513 and 5645 respondents have filled in the questionnaires anonymously in the classroom according the methodology of international HBSC study. RESULTS: Boys were using alcohol on the regular basis (once a week or more often) more frequently than girls. Prevalence of regular alcohol consumption has increased from 9.4 to 13.6% in boys and from 4.2% to 6.5% in girls (p
PubMed ID
15547314 View in PubMed
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146 records – page 1 of 15.