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Association between rehabilitation care practices and care quality in long-term care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158250
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2008 Apr-Jun;23(2):155-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pia Vähäkangas
Anja Noro
Harriet Finne-Soveri
Magnus Björkgren
Author Affiliation
Chydenius Institute, Jyväskylä University, Kokkola, Finland. pia.vahakangas@chydenius.fi
Source
J Nurs Care Qual. 2008 Apr-Jun;23(2):155-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bed Rest - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fecal Incontinence - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Long-Term Care - standards
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pressure Ulcer - epidemiology
Prevalence
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Rehabilitation Nursing - standards
Skilled Nursing Facilities - organization & administration
Urinary Incontinence - epidemiology
Abstract
This article analyzes the association between rehabilitation care practices and quality outcomes in Finland and represents unit-level (n = 256) associations between rehabilitation nursing and quality outcomes. Units classified as units providing a high frequency of rehabilitation care practices had better outcomes in 2 of 5 quality outcomes.
PubMed ID
18344782 View in PubMed
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Twenty-four-hour mobility during acute hospitalization in older medical patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120753
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2013 Mar;68(3):331-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Mette Merete Pedersen
Ann Christine Bodilsen
Janne Petersen
Nina Beyer
Ove Andersen
Louise Lawson-Smith
Henrik Kehlet
Thomas Bandholm
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre (136), Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. mette.merete.pedersen@hvh.regionh.dk
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2013 Mar;68(3):331-7
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Bed Rest - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mobility Limitation
Prospective Studies
Walking
Abstract
Inactivity during hospitalization in older medical patients may lead to functional decline. This study quantified 24-hour mobility, validated the accelerometers used, and assessed the daily level of basic mobility in acutely admitted older medical patients during their hospitalization.
This is a prospective cohort study in older medical patients able to walk independently (ambulatory patients) and those not able to walk independently (nonambulatory patients) on admission. The 24-hour mobility level during hospitalization was assessed by measuring the time in lying, sitting, and standing and/or walking, by two accelerometers. Basic mobility was quantified within 48 hours of admission and repeated daily throughout hospitalization.
Forty-three ambulatory patients and six nonambulatory patients were included. The ambulatory patients tended to be hospitalized for fewer days than the nonambulatory patients (7 vs 16, p = .13). The ambulatory patients were lying median 17 hours, (interquartile range [IQR]: 14.4-19.1), sitting 5.1 hours (IQR: 2.9-7.1), and standing and/or walking 1.1 hours (IQR: 0.6-1.7) per day. On days with independency in basic mobility, the ambulatory patients were lying 4.1 hours less compared with days with dependency in basic mobility (p
PubMed ID
22972940 View in PubMed
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Would GPs advise patients with respiratory tract infections to refrain from exercise, stay indoors or stay in bed? Survey of GPs in Poland and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262869
Source
Eur J Gen Pract. 2014 Sep;20(3):209-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Peder Andreas Halvorsen
Maciek Godycki-Cwirko
Katrine Wennevold
Hasse Melbye
Source
Eur J Gen Pract. 2014 Sep;20(3):209-13
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bed Rest - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
General Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Poland
Respiratory Tract Infections - physiopathology - therapy
Time Factors
Abstract
For patients with respiratory tract infections evidence regarding bed rest, staying indoors and refraining from exercise is sparse.
To explore how general practitioners (GPs) in Poland and Norway would advise such patients.
Convenience samples of GPs in Poland (n = 216) and Norway (n = 171) read four vignettes in which patients presented symptoms consistent with pneumonia, sinusitis, common cold and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), respectively. For each vignette, GPs were asked whether they would recommend staying indoors, staying in bed and refraining from exercise, and if so, for how many days.
For each vignette, the proportions of GPs recommending the patient to stay indoors in Poland versus Norway were 98% versus 72% (pneumonia), 92% versus 26% (sinusitis), 87% versus 9% (common cold) and 92% versus 39% (exacerbation of COPD). In regression analysis adjusted relative risks (95% CI) for recommending the patient to stay indoors in Poland versus Norway was 1.4 (1.2-1.5), 3.7 (2.8-4.8), 10.6 (6.3-17.7) and 2.5 (2.0-3.1), respectively. Among those who would recommend the patient to stay indoors, mean durations were 8.1, 6.6, 5.1 and 6.7 days in Poland versus 3.2, 2.8, 2.6 and 4.1 days in Norway, respectively. Polish GPs were also more likely to recommend staying in bed and refraining from exercise, and for a longer time, than their Norwegian colleagues.
GPs in Poland were more likely to recommend bed rest, staying indoors and refraining from exercise. This suggests that they perceived the cases as more serious than their Norwegian colleagues.
PubMed ID
24219344 View in PubMed
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