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Abused women and child custody: the ongoing exposure to abusive ex-partners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202476
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Feb;29(2):416-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
C. Shalansky
J. Ericksen
A. Henderson
Author Affiliation
Burnaby Hospital, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Feb;29(2):416-26
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Battered Women - psychology
British Columbia
Child
Child Custody - legislation & jurisprudence
Child, Preschool
Emotions
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Safety
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Abuse of women in domestic relationships has become an epidemic. Research studies have documented that abuse does not end when a woman with children leaves the abuser but, in fact, the danger increases. A father's legal right to custody of and access to his children and the children's bond with their father prevent a woman from truly breaking free of her abuser. Theoretical literature has addressed how custody and access can serve as a means for an abuser to continue his abuse and expose his children to ongoing abuse and discord. Research on how custody and access issues are affecting abused women is limited. Key details about this phenomenon are not known. Hence, a research study using the qualitative methodology of phenomenology was conducted on abused women's experiences with custody and access and the ongoing exposure to abusive ex-partners. Six single mothers who had left abusive relationships and were at the time sharing custody of and/or access to their children with their abusive ex-partners participated in the study. Unstructured, non-directive interviews were conducted. Direction for analysis was taken from the specific steps outlined by Giorgi. Data analysis revealed that all of the women were living in great fear for their safety and that of their children. The ongoing danger and stress of living with the restrictions of the law took its toll on the women and ultimately affected their physical health and psychological well-being. The women described their experiences as having four components: (1) safety--living with ongoing danger; (2) stress--living with the restrictions of the law and the legal system; (3) coping--social support systems; and (4) to heal and move forward in life.
PubMed ID
10197942 View in PubMed
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Abused women's vulnerability in daily life and in contact with psychiatric care: In the light of a caring science perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286928
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Aug;26(15-16):2384-2391
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Karin Örmon
Ulrica Hörberg
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Aug;26(15-16):2384-2391
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Battered Women - psychology
Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Women's health
Abstract
The aim of the study is to deepen the understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with health care professionals affect life. A further aim is to highlight abused women's vulnerability with a caring science perspective.
Experience of abuse has consequences for the mental health of women and girls. Abused women may experience health care as unsupportive, and as a result, often chose not to disclose their experiences of abuse.
The results of two qualitative empirical studies were analysed along with a phenomenological meaning analysis in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research.
Living one's life with experiences of abuse implies vulnerability, which can prevent abused women from achieving good health. This vulnerability results from insecurity regarding identity, along with the sense that one could have been a different individual if it were not for the abuse and thereby have a more fair chance in life. Being cared for within general psychiatric care could further increase this vulnerability. The healthcare professional's ability to care for the women who have experienced abuse leads to either an encounter of trust or else further suffering for the women.
A lifeworld-oriented caring science perspective as a foundation for care can contribute to care for abused women which reaches the existential dimensions of their vulnerability and vulnerable life situation.
It is evident that healthcare professionals should deepen their understanding of how abused women live, within a general psychiatric context. This study enables a deeper understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with healthcare professionals affect life.
PubMed ID
27349375 View in PubMed
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Actuarial assessment of violence risk in hospital-based partner assault clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152826
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Dec;40(4):56-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
N Zoe Hilton
Grant T Harris
Norah Holder
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Mental Health Centre Penetanguishene, Ontario, Canada. zhilton@mhcp.on.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Dec;40(4):56-70
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis - methods - standards
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - methods - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Pilot Projects
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Recurrence
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stalking - psychology
Abstract
Hospital-based partner assault clinics are a relatively recent addition to the community response to partner violence. In this study, 66% of 111 women attending hospital clinics for partner assault were physically injured and 43% reported death threats. Few concurrently used other services (shelters or police) and most relied on female friends and relatives for help. Many participants who currently lived with the perpetrator were contemplating leaving but only a third had made plans to do so. Participants faced an unusually high risk of future assault, according to both victim interview using the ODARA actuarial risk assessment and their own perceptions. Findings imply an important role for partner assault clinics and the feasibility of the victim service sector's using the same actuarial risk assessments as the criminal justice system.
PubMed ID
19186785 View in PubMed
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Acute forensic medical procedures used following a sexual assault among treatment-seeking women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175653
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Hester Dunlap
Paulette Brazeau
Lana Stermac
Mary Addison
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto at Sunnybrook and Women's College of Health Sciences Centre, Room 231, 7th Floor, 252 Bloor Street, West, Toronto, ON, M5S 1V6, Canada. hester_dunlap@camh.net
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Forensic Pathology - standards
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health Services - standards
Abstract
Despite the negative physical and mental health outcomes of sexual assault, a minority of sexually assaulted women seek immediate post-assault medical and legal services. This study identified the number and types of acute forensic medical procedures used by women presenting at a hospital-based urgent care centre between 1997 and 2001 within 72 hours following a reported sexual assault. The study also examined assault and non-assault factors associated with the use of procedures. It was hypothesized that assault characteristics resembling the stereotype of rape would be associated with the use of more procedures. The multiple regression indicated that injury severity, coercion severity, homelessness, and delay in presentation were significantly associated with the number of procedures received. Findings provide partial support for the hypothesis that post-assault procedures would be associated with the stereotype of rape, and highlight homeless women as a group particularly at risk for not receiving adequate medical treatment following a sexual assault.
PubMed ID
15778138 View in PubMed
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"A fool to keep staying": battered women labeling themselves stupid as an expression of gendered shame.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98680
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Jan;16(1):5-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Viveka Enander
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, SE 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. aqut@hotmail.com
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Jan;16(1):5-31
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Battered Women - psychology
Domestic Violence - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Intelligence
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Self Concept
Shame
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In this qualitative study with women who have left abusive heterosexual relationships, the informants labeling themselves stupid is investigated. Several different meanings ascribed to stupidity were found, with feeling stupid for allowing oneself to be mistreated and for staying in the abusive relationship as main themes. Four frames for interpreting the findings are presented: abusive relationship dynamics, gendered shame, the gender-equality-oriented Nordic context, and leaving processes. It is proposed that feeling- and labeling oneself-stupid is an expression of gendered shame or, more explicitly, of battered shame.
PubMed ID
19949227 View in PubMed
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The association between disordered eating and substance use and abuse in women: a community-based investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165986
Source
Women Health. 2006;44(1):1-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Niva Piran
Shannon Robinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Adult Education and Counseling Psychology, OISE/University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. npiran@oise.utoronto.ca
Source
Women Health. 2006;44(1):1-20
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Eating Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Women's health
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
A behavioral analysis was conducted of various eating disorder behaviors and their relationship with the lifetime use of different substances in a community-based sample of young adult women, aged 18-25 years. Women with particular eating disorder behaviors were selected from the 517 women who completed the Women's Health Survey. Analyses compared the frequencies of lifetime use of a range of licit and illicit substances as well as the abuse of prescription medications between each of the eating disorder groups and the normal control group. Results showed that as eating disorder behaviors became more severe, or were clustered together, the number of substance classes used, increased. Severe bingeing was consistently associated with alcohol use. Dieting and purging, with or without bingeing, was associated with the use of stimulants/ amphetamines and the abuse of sleeping pills. The results of this study suggest that the co-occurrence between subclinical levels of eating disorders and the use and abuse of a wide range of substances should inform assessment and treatment planning for adult women.
PubMed ID
17182524 View in PubMed
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The association between violence victimisation and common symptoms in Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32534
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 Nov;54(11):815-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
G. Krantz
P O Ostergren
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Box 121 33, S-402 42 Göteborg, Sweden. gunillak@nhv.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 Nov;54(11):815-21
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - etiology
Female
Headache - etiology
Humans
Irritable Mood
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Disclosure
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between violence and abuse suffered by women during childhood or adult life, and the manifestation of a high level of common physical and mental symptoms. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A questionnaire was sent to a random population of women, 40 to 50 years of age, living in a rural Swedish community. The response rate was 81.7 per cent (397 women). Odds ratios were used to estimate bivariate associations between the experience of violence/abuse and common symptoms. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to test for confounding and effect modification. MAIN RESULTS: The experience of violence or abuse during childhood was reported by 32.2 per cent of the women, while 15.6 per cent reported being abused as an adult. In both cases, these experiences reached statistical significance in their association with a high level of common symptoms (OR=1.67; 95% CI 1. 08, 2.49 and OR=2.26; 95%CI 1.30, 3.92, respectively). The associations between childhood and as well adult experience of violence or abuse and common symptoms were largely independent of potential confounders such as unemployment, job strain, social support, and sense of coherence. The combined exposure to adult violence/abuse and low psychosocial coping resources, such as low social support or a low level of sense of coherence, considerably increased the odds ratio for common symptoms and a synergistic effect seemed to exist. CONCLUSION: Violence or abuse experience is an important factor when considering illness manifestations in terms of common symptoms in women 40 to 50 years of age.
PubMed ID
11027194 View in PubMed
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Between desire and rape - narratives about being intimate partners and becoming pregnant in a violent relationship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105783
Source
Glob Health Action. 2013;6:20984
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kerstin Edin
Bo Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Umeå Centre of Gender Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; kerstin.edin@nurs.umu.se.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2013;6:20984
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Battered Women - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unplanned - psychology
Rape - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sexuality
Social Desirability
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Women subjected to intimate partner violence (IPV) experience different forms of abuse. Sexual violence is often under-reported because physically abused women, in particular, might see forced sex as an obligatory part of the sexual interplay. Accordingly, abused women have less sexual autonomy and experience unplanned pregnancies more often than other women.
To describe and analyse nine Swedish women's retrospective stories about IPV with a focus on power and coping strategies as intimate partners, particularly regarding experiences of sex, contraception, and becoming pregnant. Design : Nine qualitative interviews were carried out with women who had been subjected to very severe violence in their intimate relationships and during at least one pregnancy. The stories were analysed using 'Narrative method' with the emphasis on the women's lived experiences.
Despite the violence and many contradictory and ambivalent feelings, two of the women described having sex as desirable, reciprocal and as a respite from the rest of the relationship. The other seven women gave a negative and totally different picture, and they viewed sex either as obligatory or as a necessity to prevent or soothe aggression or referred to it as rape and as something that was physically forced upon them. The women's descriptions of their pregnancies ranged from being carefully planned and mostly wanted to completely unwelcome and including flawed contraceptive efforts with subsequent abortions.
Women subjected to IPV have diverse and complex experiences that have effects on all parts of the relationship. Intimacy might for some turn into force and rape, but for others sex does not necessarily exclude pleasure and desire and can be a haven of rest from an otherwise violent relationship. Accordingly, women may tell stories that differ from the ones expected as 'the typical abuse story', and this complexity needs to be recognized and dealt with when women seek healthcare, especially concerning contraceptives, abortions, and pregnancies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24314321 View in PubMed
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Changing help-seeking rates for intimate partner violence in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173607
Source
Women Health. 2005;41(1):1-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Janice Du Mont
Tonia Forte
Marsha M Cohen
Ilene Hyman
Sarah Romans
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Women's Health, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, M5G 1N8, Canada. janice.dumont@sw.ca
Source
Women Health. 2005;41(1):1-19
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sexual Partners - psychology
Spouse Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Truth Disclosure
Women's health
Abstract
The adverse physical and psychological sequelae of intimate partner violence (IPV) are well documented, as are government initiatives in Canada since the early 1990s to address the problem through public awareness campaigns and service enhancement programs. While these initiatives have been designed to encourage abused women to come forward, there has been little research examining changes over time in help-seeking rates among this group. To fill this void, we compared data from two large Canadian population-based, cross-sectional telephone surveys: the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey (1993-VAWS) and the 1999 General Social Survey (1999-GSS). Among women who reported physical and/or sexual violence by a current or previous partner, we examined differences in rates of disclosure of abuse, help-seeking by type of service, and barriers to service use. Abused women in the 1999-GSS were significantly more likely than those in the 1993-VAWS to have reported disclosing a violent incident(s) to a family member (66.4% v. 43.9%), friend or neighbor (67.4% v. 45.4%), doctor or nurse (31.9% v. 23.0%), and/or minister, priest, or cleric (11.5% v. 7.3%). The 1999-GSS cohort was also more likely to have presented to a shelter or transition house (11.0% v. 7.8%), a crisis center (17.3% v. 4.2%), a counselor or psychologist (39.1% v. 14.7%), a women's center (11.2% v. 3.4%), and/or a community or family center (15.4% v. 4.7%). Among those women who did not seek help, fewer in the 1999-GSS reported that they did not know of any services (6.4% v. 17.0%), or that services were not available (0.8% v. 14.5%). Although we found a demonstrable increase in the numbers of abused women seeking help, overall, rates of service utilization were still low as late as 1999, highlighting the importance of continued government commitment to funding IPV initiatives.
PubMed ID
16048865 View in PubMed
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Commentary on Flinck A, Paavilaninen E & Astedt-Kurki P (2005). Survival of intimate partner violence as experienced by women. Journal of Clinical Nursing 14, 383-393.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172863
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2005 Oct;14(9):1162-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Jill Manthorpe
Author Affiliation
Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King's College London, London, UK. jill.manthorpe@kcl.ac.uk
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2005 Oct;14(9):1162-3
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Nurse's Role
Spouse Abuse - prevention & control - psychology
Survivors - psychology
Notes
Comment On: J Clin Nurs. 2005 Mar;14(3):383-9315707449
PubMed ID
16164540 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 1 of 9.