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Commentaries -- Biorhythms, cold physiology, and pathology

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94097
Source
Pages 71-77 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
conspicuous evidence of cold acclimation by the seventh day of col.d exposure (Farrand and Folk). Recent studies by gas-liquid and thin- 72 Biorhythms, cold physiology, and pathology layer chrcmatography of hamster subscapular brBAT), perirenal white fat (PWF), and inguinal
  1 document  
Source
Pages 71-77 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Brown adipose tissue (BAT)
Cardiovascular response
Cold acclimation
Cold diuresis
Cortisol
Inguinal white fat (IWF)
Linoleic Acid
Linolenic acid
Muscular activity
Non-shivering thermogenesis
Norepinephrine infusion
Palmitic Acid
Palmitoleic acid
Perirenal white fat (PWF)
Rectal temperature
Renal response
Skin temperatures
Sleep pattern
Notes
"Renal response and lipid change during cold acclimation of rodents" (G.E. Folk, Jr. and J.J. Berberich)
"Physiological responses to cooling of the face" (J. LeBlanc)
"Adaptive changes in rats reared in cold for successive generations" (S. Itoh, K. Moriya, and H. Maekubo)
"Seasonal patterns of sleep stages and secretion of cortisol and growth hormone during 24-hour periods in northern Norway" (Elliot D. Weitzman, Andries S. deGraaf, Jon F. Sassin, Tormar Hansen, Ole B. Godtlibsen, and Leon Hellman)
"Protection against extreme cold - 10 clo of insulation?" (R.F. Goldman)
"Thermographic (infrared) evaluation of frostbite" (M.P. Hamlet)
"Circadian and seasonal hormone cycles in Caucasian males in the arctic and subarctic" (Betty Anne Philip and Donald E. Roberts)
"Biorhythmologic study of man's adaptation to the conditions of the Far North" (M.G. Kolpakov)
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Temperature regulation in the vampire bat Desodus rotundus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298782
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1965
REF ALASKA RC 955 .U9 no.64-36 1965 COPY 1 AAL-TR-64- 36 TEMPERATURE REGULATION IN THE VAMPIRE BAT DESMODUS ROTUNDUS Charles P. Lyman William A. Wimsatt September 1965 ARCTIC AEROMEDICAL LABORATORY AEROSPACE MEDICAL DIVISION AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND FORT WAINWRIGHT, ALASKA
  1 document  
Author
Lyman, Charles P.
Wimsatt, William A.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64.
Date
September 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
946526
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Bats
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Metabolism
Body temperature
Abstract
Body temperature and oxygen consumption were measured at various environmental temperatures in a series of captive and wild caught vampire bats, Desmodus rotundus. The response to changes in ambient temperatures was unpredictable and could not be correlated with the age or sex of the animals, their nutritional condition, or the length of their captivity. Body temperature varied greatly, but generally did not fall below 30° C when the ambient temperature was above 25° C. At lower ambient temperatures, some bats increased their metabolism and maintained a high body temperature for varying periods, while others showed little or no increase in metabolic rate, and their body temperatures declined. Below about 20° C body temperature, bats were unable to rewarm themselves without exogenous heat. Calculations indicate that vampires did not drink sufficient blood to maintain a homeothermic condition at the temperatures of temperate zone hibernacula. Bats could tolerate ambient temperatures of 33° C or more for only short periods. It is suggested that Desmodus is limited from spreading northward because of its inferior temperature regulation.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.
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