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49 records – page 1 of 5.

(90)Sr in King Bolete Boletus edulis and certain other mushrooms consumed in Europe and China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275929
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Feb 1;543(Pt A):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2016
Author
Michal Saniewski
Tamara Zalewska
Grazyna Krasinska
Natalia Szylke
Yuanzhong Wang
Jerzy Falandysz
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Feb 1;543(Pt A):287-94
Date
Feb-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Basidiomycota - chemistry
China
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Radiation monitoring
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The (90)Sr activity concentrations released from a radioactive fallout have been determined in a range of samples of mushrooms collected in Poland, Belarus, China, and Sweden in 1996-2013. Measurement of (90)Sr in pooled samples of mushrooms was carried out with radiochemical procedure aimed to pre-isolate the analyte from the fungal materials before it was determined using the Low-Level Beta Counter. Interestingly, the Purple Bolete Imperator rhodopurpureus collected from Yunnan in south-western China in 2012 showed (90)Sr activity concentration at around 10 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass, which was greater when compared to other mushrooms in this study. The King Bolete Boletus edulis from China showed the (90)Sr activity in caps at around 1.5 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass (whole fruiting bodies) in 2012 and for specimens from Poland activity was well lower than 1.0 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass in 1998-2010. A sample of Sarcodonimbricatus collected in 1998 from the north-eastern region of Poland impacted by Chernobyl fallout showed (90)Sr in caps at around 5 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass. Concentration of (90)Sr in Bay Bolete Royoporus (Xerocomus or Boletus) badius from affected region of Gomel in Belarus was in 2010 at 2.1 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass. In several other species from Poland (90)Sr was at
PubMed ID
26590866 View in PubMed
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210Po, 210Pb, 40K and 137Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms and ingestion doses to man from high consumption rates of these wild foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119426
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Justin P Gwynn
Anna Nalbandyan
Geir Rudolfsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, The Fram Centre, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway. justin.gwynn@nrpa.no
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Angiosperms
Basidiomycota
Eating
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioisotopes - analysis
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This paper discusses activity concentrations of (210)Po, (210)Pb, (40)K and (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms collected from Øvre Dividalen national park, Northern Norway and derives committed effective ingestion doses to man based on high consumption rates of these wild foods. Edible wild berries and mushrooms accumulated similar levels of (210)Pb, but mushrooms accumulated higher levels of (210)Po and (40)K than berries. There appears to be a clear difference in the ability of Leccinum spp. of fungi to accumulate (210)Po and/or translocate (210)Po to mushrooms compared to Russula spp. of fungi. Activity concentrations of (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms from Øvre Dividalen national park reflected the lower levels of fallout of this radionuclide in Northern Norway compared to more central areas following the Chernobyl accident. For mushrooms, ingestion doses are dominated by (210)Po, while for berries, (40)K is typically the main contributor to dose. Based on high consumption rates, ingestion doses arising from the combination of (210)Po, (210)Pb and (40)K were up to 0.05 mSv/a for berries and 0.50 mSv/a for mushrooms. Consumption of such wild foods may result in a significant contribution to total annual doses when consumed in large quantities, particularly when selecting mushrooms species that accumulate high activity concentrations of (210)Po.
PubMed ID
23103573 View in PubMed
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Abuse of indigenous psilocybin mushrooms: a new fashion and some psychiatric complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248553
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1978 Jun;132:602-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
C. Hyde
G. Glancy
P. Omerod
D. Hall
G S Taylor
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1978 Jun;132:602-4
Date
Jun-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basidiomycota
Hallucinations - chemically induced
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - chemically induced
Psilocybine
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Abstract
The use for hallucinogenic purposes of an indigenous mushroom, Psilocybe semilanceata indigenous to Britain is reported in three patients. Typical psychedelic, transient psychotic and more prolonged schizophrenia-like states were seen, with sympathomimetic signs noted in two cases, in one being prolonged. Enquiry about such mushroom abuse should be considered in individuals presenting to medical or psychiatric emergency clinics.
PubMed ID
566144 View in PubMed
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[A case of botulism caused by home-cooked mushrooms].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112326
Source
Gig Sanit. 1965 Nov;30(11):84-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1965

[A case of botulism caused by home-cooked mushrooms].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102557
Source
Gig Sanit. 1965 Nov;30(11):84-5.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1965

Apiotrichum terrigenum sp. nov., a soil-associated yeast found in both the UK and mainland Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284769
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2016 Dec;66(12):5046-5050
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Stephen A James
Christopher J Bond
Rachael Stanley
Sreenivas R Ravella
Gábor Péter
Dénes Dlauchy
Ian N Roberts
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2016 Dec;66(12):5046-5050
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Basidiomycota - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Fungal - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal Spacer - genetics
Hungary
Mycological Typing Techniques
Norway
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soil Microbiology
United Kingdom
Abstract
Five arthroconidium-producing yeast strains representing a novel Trichosporon-like species were independently isolated from the UK, Hungary and Norway. Two strains (Bio4T and Bio21) were isolated from biogas reactors used for processing grass silage, with a third strain (S8) was isolated from soil collected at the same UK site. Two additional strains were isolated in mainland Europe, one from soil in Norway (NCAIM Y.02175) and the other from sewage in Hungary (NCAIM Y.02176). Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region indicated that the novel species belongs to the recently reinstated genus Apiotrichum and is most closely related to Apiotrichum scarabaeorum, a beetle-associated species first found in South Africa. Despite having similar physiological characteristics, the two species can be readily distinguished from one another by ITS sequencing. The species name Apiotrichum terrigenum sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains, with Bio4T (=CBS 11373T=NCYC 3540T) designated as the type strain. The Mycobank deposit number is MB817431.
Notes
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Cites: Stud Mycol. 2015 Jun;81:1-2626955196
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2013 Dec;30(12):2725-924132122
Cites: FEMS Yeast Res. 2001 Apr;1(1):15-2212702459
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2000 May;50 Pt 3:1351-7110843082
Cites: Int J Syst Bacteriol. 1996 Jan;46(1):189-948573494
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2004 May;54(Pt 3):975-8615143052
Cites: Stud Mycol. 2015 Jun;81:85-14726955199
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 1994 Nov 11;22(22):4673-807984417
PubMed ID
27580597 View in PubMed
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Associations between atmospheric concentrations of spores and emergency department visits for asthma among children living in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138359
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2010 Oct-Dec;65(4):201-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marie Raphoz
Mark S Goldberg
Michelle Garneau
Léa Héguy
Marie-France Valois
Frédéric Guay
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2010 Oct-Dec;65(4):201-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Basidiomycota
Child
Child, Preschool
Cladosporium
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Ganoderma
Humans
Infant
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Mitosporic Fungi
Poisson Distribution
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Spores, Fungal
Abstract
The authors carried out a time-series study to determine whether short-term increases in the concentrations of spores were associated with emergency department visits from asthma among children 0 to 9 years of age in Montreal, 1994-2004. Concentrations of spores were obtained from one sampling monitor. The authors used parametric Poisson models to model the association between daily admissions to emergency rooms for asthma and ambient exposures to a variety of spores, adjusting for secular trends, changes in weather, and chemical pollutants. For first admissions and exposures to Basidiomycetes, the authors found positive associations at all lags but the concurrent day. For Deuteromycetes and Cladosporium, risks were positive starting at lag 3 days and diminished at lag 6 days. There was little evidence of associations for readmissions, except for Basidiomycetes. The results indicate that Basidiomycetes and Cladosporium spores may be implicated in the exacerbation of asthma among children, most notably in the case of first-time visits to emergency departments, and that the effects appear to be delayed by several days.
PubMed ID
21186425 View in PubMed
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Changes in host chitinase isoforms in relation to wounding and colonization by Heterobasidion annosum: early and strong defense response in 33-year-old resistant Norway spruce clone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83008
Source
Tree Physiol. 2006 Feb;26(2):169-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Fossdal Carl Gunnar
Hietala Ari M
Kvaalen Harald
Solheim Halvor
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Forest Research Institute, Høgskoleveien 8, N-1432, As, Norway. carl.fossdal@skogforsk.no
Source
Tree Physiol. 2006 Feb;26(2):169-77
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Basidiomycota - genetics - growth & development
Chitinase - metabolism
DNA, Fungal - analysis
DNA, Plant - analysis
Immunity, Natural
Isoelectric Focusing
Isoenzymes - metabolism
Picea - enzymology - metabolism - microbiology
Plant Bark - enzymology - metabolism - microbiology
Plant Diseases - genetics - microbiology
Plant Proteins - metabolism
Stress, mechanical
Time Factors
Tissue Culture Techniques
Abstract
We studied the defense reactions of 33-year-old susceptible and resistant clones of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) to the major root-rot fungus Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. and determined if tissue cultures can be used as a model system for studying defense responses of mature trees at the molecular level. Quantitative PCR analysis of genomic DNA obtained from samples taken at different times along the lesion length in living bark indicated that the fungus was present in higher amounts and extended further into the host tissue in the susceptible clone than in the resistant clone. In protein extracts from the same lesion samples, there were differences in temporal and spatial changes in host chitinase isoform profiles between the resistant and susceptible clones. Host chitinase isoforms with pI values approximately 4.8, 4.4 and 3.7 increased more during the first 7 days after wounding and inoculation and extended further along the lesion length in the resistant clone than in the susceptible clone. These results suggest that the time from wounding and infection to induction of defense-related expression is shorter in the resistant clone indicating a more efficient host defense response than in the susceptible clone. Tissue cultures from the same clones were not resistant to H. annosum and showed no difference in the timing of the increase in chitinase isoforms in response to the pathogen. However, tissue cultures from both clones showed an increase in chitinase isoforms within 6 to 24 h past inoculation, indicating that increased chitinase expression in response to the pathogen is part of a general defense response common to both mature clones and tissue cultures.
PubMed ID
16356913 View in PubMed
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Climate change accelerates local disease extinction rates in a long-term wild host-pathogen association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297416
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 08; 24(8):3526-3536
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
Jiasui Zhan
Lars Ericson
Jeremy J Burdon
Author Affiliation
State Key Laboratory for Ecological Pest Control for Fujian and Taiwan Crops, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, China.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 08; 24(8):3526-3536
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Basidiomycota - physiology
Climate change
Extinction, Biological
Filipendula - microbiology
Global warming
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Plant Diseases - microbiology
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Sweden
Abstract
Pathogens are a significant component of all plant communities. In recent years, the potential for existing and emerging pathogens of agricultural crops to cause increased yield losses as a consequence of changing climatic patterns has raised considerable concern. In contrast, the response of naturally occurring, endemic pathogens to a warming climate has received little attention. Here, we report on the impact of a signature variable of global climate change - increasing temperature - on the long-term epidemiology of a natural host-pathogen association involving the rust pathogen Triphragmium ulmariae and its host plant Filipendula ulmaria. In a host-pathogen metapopulation involving approximately 230 host populations growing on an archipelago of islands in the Gulf of Bothnia we assessed changes in host population size and pathogen epidemiological measures over a 25-year period. We show how the incidence of disease and its severity declines over that period and most importantly demonstrate a positive association between a long-term trend of increasing extinction rates in individual pathogen populations of the metapopulation and increasing temperature. Our results are highly suggestive that changing climatic patterns, particularly mean monthly growing season (April-November) temperature, are markedly influencing the epidemiology of plant disease in this host-pathogen association. Given the important role plant pathogens have in shaping the structure of communities, changes in the epidemiology of pathogens have potentially far-reaching impacts on ecological and evolutionary processes. For these reasons, it is essential to increase understanding of pathogen epidemiology, its response to warming, and to invoke these responses in forecasts for the future.
PubMed ID
29485725 View in PubMed
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Comparative evaluation of the indigenous microbial diversity vs. drilling fluid contaminants in the NEEM Greenland ice core.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257989
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):238-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Vanya Miteva
Caroline Burlingame
Todd Sowers
Jean Brenchley
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2014 Aug;89(2):238-56
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - genetics - isolation & purification
Ascomycota - genetics - isolation & purification
Basidiomycota - genetics - isolation & purification
Biodiversity
DNA Contamination
Environmental Microbiology
Genes, Bacterial
Genes, Fungal
Greenland
Ice
Ice Cover - microbiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Molecular Typing
Phylogeny
Proteobacteria - genetics - isolation & purification
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Abstract
Demonstrating that the detected microbial diversity in nonaseptically drilled deep ice cores is truly indigenous is challenging because of potential contamination with exogenous microbial cells. The NEEM Greenland ice core project provided a first-time opportunity to determine the origin and extent of contamination throughout drilling. We performed multiple parallel cultivation and culture-independent analyses of five decontaminated ice core samples from different depths (100-2051 m), the drilling fluid and its components Estisol and Coasol, and the drilling chips collected during drilling. We created a collection of diverse bacterial and fungal isolates (84 from the drilling fluid and its components, 45 from decontaminated ice, and 66 from drilling chips). Their categorization as contaminants or intrinsic glacial ice microorganisms was based on several criteria, including phylogenetic analyses, genomic fingerprinting, phenotypic characteristics, and presence in drilling fluid, chips, and/or ice. Firmicutes and fungi comprised the dominant group of contaminants among isolates and cloned rRNA genes. Conversely, most Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria originating from the ice were identified as intrinsic. This study provides a database of potential contaminants useful for future studies of NEEM cores and can contribute toward developing standardized protocols for contamination detection and ensuring the authenticity of the microbial diversity in deep glacial ice.
PubMed ID
24450335 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.