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264 records – page 1 of 27.

[40th anniversary of the Ufa Research Institute of Occupational Medicine and Human Ecology. Results of activities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216185
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1995;(12):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

[Activities of the Ufa Research Institute of Hygiene and Occupational Health under the new economic conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103761
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(5):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

[Age-dependent CYP1A2 gene polymorphism -163C>A in three ethnic groups of Bashkortostan Republic residents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266130
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(3):412-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
V V Érdman
T R Nasibullin
I A Tuktarova
G F Korytina
L Z Akhmadishina
O V Kochetova
O E Mustafina
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(3):412-7
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - ethnology - genetics
Bashkiria - ethnology
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2 - genetics - metabolism
Ethnic Groups - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Xenobiotics - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
On a sample of 1240 persons from Bashkortostan, including Russian, Bashkirs and Tatars, the analysis of allele and genotype frequencies distribution of CYP1A2 gene polymorphism -163C>A was performed by PCR-RFLP in view of belonging to a particular age cohort. In Russian and Bashkirs ethnic groups we observed age-dependent decrease of CYP1A2*C allele and CYP1A2*CI*C genotype frequencies (in Russian statistically significant for allele and genotype, the Bashkirs--only for allele) and a statistically significant increase of CYP1A2*A allele and CYP1A2*A/*A genotype frequencies. The set reduction in the frequency of the wild allele CYP1A2*C and increasing the frequency of the mutant allele CYP1A2*A with age may be due to greater survival of persons who are carriers of that allelic variants of CYP1A2 gene, providing a more efficient metabolism of xenobiotics.
PubMed ID
25826985 View in PubMed
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[Alimentation dependent health disorders among adult population of Bashkortostan Republic and their relation with nutritional traits].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156420
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2008;(5):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
R M Takaev
N S Kondrova
I M Baikina
T K Larionova
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2008;(5):15-9
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bashkiria - epidemiology
Feeding Behavior
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The authors demonstrated relationship between alimentation dependent diseases among adult population of the Republic and nutritional traits of the population, defined major directions of program to optimize nutrition of the population.
PubMed ID
18589724 View in PubMed
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[Allometric signals of technogenic actions on the population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209875
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(8):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
N K Makarova
V V Isakevich
N I Simonova
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(8):11-5
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Bashkiria - epidemiology
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Mathematics
Models, Biological
Morbidity
Mortality
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The authors demonstrate possible use of allometric equations to describe age-matched oncologic morbidity and mortality in stable population. Deviations from the allometric model (allometric signals) could be traced to changed technogenic load on the population. Examples show relationships between rank parameters of the models and the technogenic load levels.
PubMed ID
9377046 View in PubMed
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[All-Russian scientific and practical conference "Oil and health" dedicated to 75th anniversary of Bashkir oil].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159926
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2007;(10):42-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2007

[Analysis of deletions in the dystrophin gene in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in the Bashkir Republic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201376
Source
Genetika. 1999 Apr;35(4):551-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
O V Grinchuk
I M Khidiiatova
A V Kiselev
R V Magzhanov
E K Khusnutdinova
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry and Cytochemistry, Ufa Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia.
Source
Genetika. 1999 Apr;35(4):551-5
Date
Apr-1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bashkiria
Child
Child, Preschool
Dystrophin - genetics
Exons
Female
Gene Deletion
Heterozygote Detection
Humans
Muscular Dystrophies - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prenatal Diagnosis
Abstract
The deletion spectrum and distribution of deletion breakpoints (DBs) in 36 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) from 33 families and in three patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) from one family from Bashkortostan were studied by amplifying 20 exons of the dystrophin gene by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR). Eight out of 34 unrelated DMD (BMD) patients (23.2%) were shown to carry a deletion varying in size from one to seven exons. Most DBs (15 out of 16, 93.7%) were in the distal region of the gene, commonly between exons 44-45, 45-47, and 50-52. Thus, high-polymorphic intergenic markers located in introns 44 (STR 44), 45 (STR 45), 49 (STR 49), and 50 (STR 50) can be used for indirect or direct carrier detection among women closely related to DMD patients that carry a deletion with DB located between exons 44-45, 45-47, and 50-52. Prenatal diagnosis of DMD is also possible in these families.
PubMed ID
10420280 View in PubMed
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[An analysis of the long-term stroke morbidity and mortality in the regions of the Russian Federation included in the Federal patient assistance reorganization program].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303831
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2020; 120(12. Vyp. 2):37-41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2020
Author
O A Klochihina
V V Shprakh
L V Stakhovskaya
E A Polunina
Author Affiliation
Prevent Age - International Institute of Integrative Preventive and Anti-Aging Medicine, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2020; 120(12. Vyp. 2):37-41
Date
2020
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Bashkiria
Humans
Morbidity
Russia - epidemiology
Stroke - epidemiology - therapy
Tatarstan
Abstract
To analyze the average long-term incidence of stroke and mortality in the regions of Russia in the territories included in the Federal program for the reorganization of care for stroke patients from 2009 to 2016.
The study is based on data from the territorial population register for an eight-year period for seven territories in the regions of Russia included in the Federal program for the reorganization of care for stroke patients. The study included the following territories: Stavropol krai, the Republic of Bashkortostan, Sverdlovsk region, Irkutsk region, Sakhalin region, and the Republic of Tatarstan. The total number of stroke cases in the study areas was 29 779.
The highest average incidence was shown in the Republic of Tatarstan, which had significant differences with all regions (p
PubMed ID
33449531 View in PubMed
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[An epidemiological analysis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome morbidity in the Republic of Bashkortostan in 1997].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198044
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Nov-Dec;(6):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
R G Nurgaleeva
E A Tkachenko
A G Stepanenko
I M Mustafin
S G Kireev
T K Dzagurova
A E Dekonenko
L A Klimchuk
G D Minin
Author Affiliation
Bashkir Republican Center of State Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance, Ufa, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Nov-Dec;(6):45-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Animals
Bashkiria - epidemiology
Child
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Disease Reservoirs - statistics & numerical data - veterinary
Disease Vectors
Female
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Rodentia
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Distribution
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The outbreak of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in the Republic of Bashkortostan, resulting in 10,057 registered cases of the disease (287 cases per 100,000 of the population), was analyzed. HFRS cases among the population were registered in 52 out of 54 regions of Bashkortostan. 31% of the total number of patients were the inhabitants of rural regions (170 cases per 100,000) and 69% were urban dwellers (295 cases per 100,000), mainly in Ufa (512 cases per 100,000). HFRS morbidity among males was fourfold higher than among females. In 70% of cases persons aged 20-49 years were affected. 5% of the total number of patients were children aged up to 14 years. In 34 cases (0.4%) the severe clinical course of the disease had a fatal outcome. Cases of HFRS were registered from April 1997 till March 1998 with the highest morbidity rate observed during the period of August-December. In most cases (46.8%) both urban and rural dwellers contacted infection during a short-term stay in the forest. As the result of the serological examination of the patients, all HFRS cases were etiologically attributed to hantavirus, serotype Puumala. The main natural reservoir of this virus and the source of human infection in Bashkortostan were bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), the domination species among small mammals in this region.
PubMed ID
10876849 View in PubMed
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264 records – page 1 of 27.