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A 7-day activity diary for assessment of daily energy expenditure validated by the doubly labelled water method in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52682
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 Sep;51(9):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
L E Bratteby
B. Sandhagen
H. Fan
G. Samuelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 Sep;51(9):585-91
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Basal Metabolism
Calorimetry, Indirect
Comparative Study
Deuterium - diagnostic use
Energy Metabolism
Exertion
Female
Humans
Male
Oxygen Isotopes
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Water
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To validate the use of an activity diary and predicted BMR for assessment of daily total energy expenditure (TEE) and physical activity level (PAL = TEE/BMR) in adolescents. DESIGN: TEE and PAL estimated from activity diary records kept for seven days and BMR predicted from age, gender and body weight were compared with the results of doubly labelled water (DLW) measurements and indirect calorimetry performed during the same time period. SETTING: The Unit of paediatric Physiology of the Department of Clinical Physiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Fifty randomly selected 15 y old adolescents (25 boys and 25 girls). RESULTS: The mean difference between TEE estimated in all adolescents by the activity diary and by DLW methods was 1.2%. The limits of agreement (mean difference 2 s.d.) were -3.47 and 3.77 MD/d, equivalent to a coefficient of variation of 15%. The mean difference between PAL assessed by activity diary records and by DLW measurements was 0.001, and the limits of agreement between the two methods were 0.54. CONCLUSIONS: The results imply that the activity diary method provides a close estimate of TEE and PAL in population groups.
PubMed ID
9306084 View in PubMed
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A 24-week dietary and physical activity lifestyle intervention reduces hepatic insulin resistance in the obese with chronic hepatitis C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117638
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Venessa Pattullo
Andres Duarte-Rojo
Wael Soliman
Florencia Vargas-Vorackova
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Ivan G Fantus
Johane Allard
Jenny Heathcote
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Liver Int. 2013 Mar;33(3):410-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Basal Metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hepatitis C, Chronic - complications - pathology
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - complications - diet therapy - therapy
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Obesity- and virus-mediated insulin resistance (IR) are associated with adverse hepatic and metabolic outcomes in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This study evaluates the tolerability and effects of a dietary and physical activity (PA) intervention in obese patients with insulin-resistant CHC.
Obese patients (body mass index, BMI =30 kg/m(2) ) with CHC were recruited prospectively. Non-diabetic patients with IR (homeostasis model assessment of IR, HOMA-IR >2.0) proceeded to a 24-week lifestyle intervention comprising pedometer monitored increase in PA (=10 000 steps/day) and an individualised dietary plan.
Ten non-cirrhotic and six cirrhotic patients [age 52 ± 8.5 years, BMI 35.9 (31.46-38.21)kg/m(2) ] were recruited, of whom all 16 (100%) completed the 24-week protocol. Increase in PA from 6853 (2440-9533) to 10 697 (7959-13566) steps/day (P = 0.001) and reduction in caloric intake from 2263 (1805.4-2697.0) to 1281 (1099.5-1856.3) kcal/day (equivalent to reduction of median 33% (25.3-49.8%), P
PubMed ID
23278982 View in PubMed
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Ability to predict resting energy expenditure with six equations compared to indirect calorimetry in octogenarian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285968
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2017 Jun;92:52-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Mikael Karlsson
Erika Olsson
Wulf Becker
Brita Karlström
Tommy Cederholm
Per Sjögren
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2017 Jun;92:52-55
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Basal Metabolism
Body Composition
Body mass index
Body Weight
Calorimetry, Indirect
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Sweden
Abstract
The accuracy of predictive equations for calculating resting energy expenditure (REE) in elderly people has been questioned. Aging is associated with progressive declines in REE, which partly is explained by loss of fat free mass (FFM). Against this background we aimed to identify the most accurate predictive equation for REE in octogenarian men, taking body composition into account and using indirect calorimetry as reference value. REE was measured in 22 men (mean age 82.6±0.3years) and compared with six predictive equations: two based on FFM and four based on body weight, height and/or age. FFM was derived from Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analyses. Spearman's rank correlations showed a moderate to high positive monotonic correlation (r=0.62 to 0.79) between measured and calculated REE (all p
PubMed ID
28323025 View in PubMed
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Activity profile and physiological response to football training for untrained males and females, elderly and youngsters: influence of the number of players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100640
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Apr;20 Suppl 1:14-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
M B Randers
L. Nybo
J. Petersen
J J Nielsen
L. Christiansen
M. Bendiksen
J. Brito
J. Bangsbo
P. Krustrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Section of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. pkrustrup@ifi.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Apr;20 Suppl 1:14-23
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Basal Metabolism - physiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Denmark
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Homeless Persons
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Soccer - physiology
Time and Motion Studies
Videotape Recording
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study examined the activity profile, heart rate and metabolic response of small-sided football games for untrained males (UM, n=26) and females (UF, n=21) and investigated the influence of the number of players (UM: 1v1, 3v3, 7v7; UF: 2v2, 4v4 and 7v7). Moreover, heart rate response to small-sided games was studied for children aged 9 and 12 years (C9+C12, n=75), as well as homeless (HM, n=15), middle-aged (MM, n=9) and elderly (EM, n=11) men. During 7v7, muscle glycogen decreased more for UM than UF (28 +/- 6 vs 11 +/- 5%; P90% of HR(max) ranged from 147 +/- 4 (EM) to 162 +/- 2 (UM) b.p.m. and 10.8 +/- 1.5 (UF) to 47.8 +/- 5.8% (EM). Time >90% of HR(max) (UM: 16-17%; UF: 8-13%) and time spent with high speed running (4.1-5.1%) was similar for training with 2-14 players, but more high-intensity runs were performed with few players (UM 1v1: 140 +/- 17; UM 7v7: 97 +/- 5; P
PubMed ID
20149143 View in PubMed
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Adaptation to cold in arctic and tropical mammals and birds in relation to body temperature, insulation, and basal metabolic rate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301686
Source
Biological Bulletin. 1950 Oct;99(2):259-71.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1950
Author
Scholander, P.F.
Hock, R.
Walters, V.
Irving, L.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Biological Bulletin. 1950 Oct;99(2):259-71.
Date
1950
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Animals
Arctic Regions
Basal Metabolism
Birds
Body temperature
Cold Temperature
Mammals
PubMed ID
14791423 View in PubMed
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Adaption of the basal metabolic rate of man to climate -- a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2672
Source
Metabolism. 5:531-542.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1956
Author
Wilson, O.
Author Affiliation
University of Lund (Sweden)
Source
Metabolism. 5:531-542.
Date
1956
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Basal metabolic rate
Seasonal biorhythm
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1056.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 320.
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Adaptive Changes in Basal Metabolic Rate in Humans in Different Eco-Geographical Areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271453
Source
Coll Antropol. 2015 Dec;39(4):887-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Arkady L Maximov
Victor Sh Belkin
Leonid Kalichman
Eugene D Kobyliansky
Source
Coll Antropol. 2015 Dec;39(4):887-92
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Animals
Basal Metabolism - physiology
Egypt
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Abstract
Our aim was to establish whether the human basal metabolic rate (BMR) shifts towards the reduction of vital functions as an adaptation response to extreme environmental conditions. Data was collected in arid and Extreme North zones. The arid zone samples included Bedouins living in the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt, Turkmen students, the Pedagogical University of Chardzhou, Turkmenistan born Russians and Russian soldiers. Soldiers were divided into 3 groups according to the length of their tour of duty in the area: 1st group: up to six months, 2nd group: up to 2 years and the 3rd group: 3-5 years. The Extreme North samples comprised Chukchi natives, 1st generation Russian immigrants born in the area and 3 groups of soldiers comparable to the soldiers from Turkmenistan. BMR values of the new recruits had the highest values of total and relative BMR (1769 ± 16 and 28.3 ± 0.6, correspondingly). The total and relative BMR tended to decrease within a longer adaptation period. The BMR values of officers who served >3 years in Turkmenistan were very similar to the Turkmenistan born Russians (1730 ± 14 vs. 1726 ± 18 and 26.5 ± 0.6 vs. 27.3 ± 0.7, correspondingly). Similarly, in Chukotka, the highest relative BMR was found in the new recruits, serving up to 6 months (28.1 ± 0.7) and was significantly (p 3 years, compared to the middle-aged Chukchi or Chukotka-born Russians (25.8 ± 0.5 vs. 25.6 ± 0.5 and 25.5 ± 0.6, correspondingly). The BMR parameters demonstrated a stronger association with body weight than with age. In extreme environmental conditions, migrant populations showed a decrease in BMR, thus reducing its vital functions. The BMR reduction effect with the adequate adaptive transformation is likely to be the key strategy for developing programs to facilitate human and animal adaptation to extreme factors. This process is aimed at preserving the optimum energy balance and homeostasis while minimizing stress on the body's vital functions.
PubMed ID
26987156 View in PubMed
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Adaptive dimensions of health research among indigenous Siberians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78876
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Mar-Apr;19(2):165-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
Snodgrass J Josh
Sorensen Mark V
Tarskaia Larissa A
Leonard William R
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403, USA. jjosh@uoregon.edu
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Mar-Apr;19(2):165-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Arctic Regions
Basal Metabolism
Biomedical research
Cold - adverse effects
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Culture
Geography
Humans
Life Style
Population Groups
Siberia
Time Factors
Abstract
Present evidence suggests that modern humans were the first hominid species to successfully colonize high-latitude environments (> or =55 degrees N). Given evidence for a recent (
PubMed ID
17286259 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin and adiponectin receptor gene variants in relation to resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, and adiposity-related phenotypes in the Quebec Family Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165769
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jan;85(1):26-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Ruth J F Loos
Stéphanie Ruchat
Tuomo Rankinen
Angelo Tremblay
Louis Pérusse
Claude Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jan;85(1):26-34
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - genetics - metabolism
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Basal Metabolism - genetics - physiology
Body Composition - genetics
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - genetics - metabolism
Oxygen Consumption - genetics - physiology
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Quebec
Receptors, Adiponectin
Receptors, Cell Surface - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
Despite adiponectin's presumed role in fatty acid oxidation and energy homeostasis, little is known about the effect of gene variants on substrate oxidation, energy expenditure, and adiposity-related phenotypes.
We examined the effects of genetic variation in adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and adiponectin receptors 1 and 2 (ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2) on resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient (RQ), and adiposity-related phenotypes.
We studied the associations of ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1, and ADIPOR2 polymorphisms with resting metabolic rate, RQ, and body mass index, percentage body fat, sum of 6 skinfold thicknesses, waist circumference, and total, subcutaneous, and visceral fat in 759 participants in the Québec Family Study.
The ADIPOQ 45T-->G single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was significantly (P = 0.0002 to 0.04) associated with overall adiposity and abdominal adiposity; the rare homozygotes (G/G) had a leaner phenotype than did the carriers of the common allele. One SNP each in the putative promoter of ADIPOR1 (ie, -3882T-->C) and ADIPOR2 (ie, IVS1 -1352G-->A) was associated with RQ (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively), and the association was even stronger in nonobese persons (P = 0.02 and 0.003). Carriers of the common alleles (ADIPOR1 T and ADIPOR2 G alleles) had a lower RQ than did the rare homozygotes. A significant genotype-by-genotype interaction (P = 0.0002 to 0.02) was found between SNPs in the promoters of ADIPOQ (-3971A-->G) and ADIPOR1 (-3882T-->C). Subjects carrying the minor ADIPOQ allele (G allele) who were rare homozygotes (C/C) for the ADIPOR1 SNP had a higher RQ (P = 0.003) and greater overall (P G variant contributes to overall fatness and abdominal obesity are confirmed. Moreover, variants in the promoter region of both ADIPOR genes contribute to substrate oxidation.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jan;85(1):1-217209169
PubMed ID
17209173 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, education and weight loss effort are independently associated with energy reporting quality in the Ontario Food Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164471
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Aug;10(8):803-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Heather Ward
Valerie Tarasuk
Rena Mendelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, 150 College St, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Aug;10(8):803-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Basal Metabolism
Body mass index
Educational Status
Energy Intake - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Self Disclosure
Weight Loss
Abstract
To examine the associations of adiposity, dietary restraint and other personal characteristics with energy reporting quality.
Secondary analysis of 230 women and 158 men from the 1997/98 Ontario Food Survey.
Energy reporting quality was estimated by ratios of energy intake (EI) to both basal metabolic rate (BMR) and total energy expenditure (TEE). Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to examine energy reporting quality between two dietary recalls and in relation to body mass index (BMI) with adjustment for potential confounders. Energy reporting quality was explored across categories of age, BMI, income, education, dieting status and food insecurity through analysis of variance (ANOVA).
From the ANOVA, energy reporting quality was associated with BMI group, age category and weight loss for men and women, as well as with education among women (P 0.05). EI:BMR and EI:TEE on the first and second 24-hour recalls were positively related (P
PubMed ID
17381922 View in PubMed
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152 records – page 1 of 16.