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The acute effects of inhaled salbutamol on the beat-to-beat variability of heart rate and blood pressure assessed by spectral analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208850
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
T. Jartti
T. Kaila
K. Tahvanainen
T. Kuusela
T. Vanto
I. Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Albuterol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Baroreflex - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Bronchospirometry
Child
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Finland
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Respiratory Function Tests
Supine Position
Abstract
We wanted to study the effects of a 600 micrograms inhaled salbutamol dose on the cardiovascular and respiratory autonomic nervous regulation in eight children suffering from bronchial asthma.
In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study we continuously measured electrocardiogram, finger systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and flow-volume spirometry at baseline as well as 20 min and 2 h after the drug inhalation. The R-R interval (the time between successive heart beats) and SAP variabilities were assessed by using spectral analysis. Baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by using cross-spectral analysis.
Salbutamol significantly decreased the total and low frequency (LF) variability of R-R intervals as well as the high frequency (HF) variability of R-R intervals and of SAP. Salbutamol significantly increased the LF/HF ratio of R-R intervals and of SAP, minute ventilation, heart rate and forced pulmonary function in comparison with placebo. The weight of the subjects significantly correlated positively with baroreflex sensitivity and negatively with heart rate after the salbutamol inhalation.
We conclude that the acute salbutamol inhalation decreases cardiovagal nervous responsiveness, increases sympathetic dominance in the cardiovascular autonomic balance, and has a tendency to decrease baroreflex sensitivity in addition to improved pulmonary function.
PubMed ID
9146855 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of heart rate variability in assessment of baroreflex sensitivity in anesthetized rats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9203
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(2):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
I A Khripachenko
A V Savust'ianenko
L A Kedenko
I I Zinkovych
Author Affiliation
Donetsk Medical University.
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(2):46-50
Date
2005
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic alpha-Agonists - pharmacology
Analysis of Variance
Anesthesia
Animals
Baroreflex - drug effects - physiology
Electrocardiography
English Abstract
Heart Rate - drug effects - physiology
Male
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects - physiology
Phenylephrine - pharmacology
Rats
Abstract
Spectral analysis of the heart rate variability can be used as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity in ketamine anesthetized rats. Stimulation of delta1-receptors with phenylephrine (0.01 mg/kg, i.v.) results in a rise of the strength of heart rate regulation, principally in the low frequency band. Maximal deviations of spectral indexes from basal level were observed on 4-8 min for low (0.2-1 Hz) and high (1-3 Hz) frequencies bands and on 10-15 min for very low (0.08-0.2 Hz) frequency band after phenylephrine injection.
PubMed ID
15943230 View in PubMed
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Cross spectral analysis in assessment of baroreflex gain in patients with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11015
Source
Ann Noninvasive Electrocardiol. 1997 Jul;2(3):229-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
K E Airaksinen
K U Tahvanainen
T A Kuusela
H V Huikuri
M J Niemela
P. Karjalainen
D L Eckberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Ann Noninvasive Electrocardiol. 1997 Jul;2(3):229-35
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Baroreflex - drug effects - physiology
Blood Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - physiopathology
Evaluation Studies
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Phenylephrine - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration
Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared
Vasoconstrictor Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
Background: Interest in determination of baroreflex sensitivity in clinical practice is growing because of its prognostic information in patients with heart disease. The purpose of the present study was to assess the feasibility of cross spectral analysis in the determination of baroreflex gain from spontaneous RR interval and systolic pressure fluctuations, and to compare the results to the traditional pharmacological method in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods. We measured the gain and time lag between RR interval and systolic pressure variabilities in the frequency domain, and compared baroreflex indexes obtained by this technique with standard phenylephrine tests in 32 patients with coronary artery disease. Results. Cross spectral analysis by fast Fourier transform techniques yielded acceptable (> 0.5) coherence between systolic pressure and RR interval in the mid- (0.07-0.15 Hz) and in the respiratory-frequency (0.15-0.40 Hz) band fluctuations in 30 patients (94%), with mean coherences of 0.69 and 0.74. The mean phase difference in the mid-frequency hand was greater than in the respiratory-frequency band (-83 vs -23 degrees, P
PubMed ID
11541511 View in PubMed
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Drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to ANG II in young and old rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100465
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2010 Nov;299(5):R1135-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Robert L Thunhorst
Terry G Beltz
Alan Kim Johnson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Iowa, 11 Seashore Hall E., Iowa City, IA 52242-1407, USA. robert-thunhorst@uiowa.edu
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2010 Nov;299(5):R1135-41
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Age Factors
Aging
Angiotensin I - administration & dosage
Angiotensin II - administration & dosage
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Animals
Baroreflex - drug effects
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Captopril - administration & dosage
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drinking - drug effects
Drinking Behavior - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Infusions, Intravenous
Male
Minoxidil - administration & dosage
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Urodynamics - drug effects
Vasodilator Agents - administration & dosage
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Abstract
We investigated water drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to intravenous infusions of ANG II in young (4 mo), middle-aged adult (12 mo), and old (29 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Infusions of ANG II began with arterial blood pressure either at control levels or at reduced levels following injection of the vasodilator minoxidil. Under control conditions, mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to ANG II rose to the same level for all groups, and middle-aged and old rats drank as much or more water in response to ANG II compared with young rats, depending on whether intakes were analyzed using absolute or body weight-adjusted values. When arterial blood pressure first was reduced with minoxidil, MAP in response to ANG II stabilized at significantly lower levels compared with control conditions for all groups. Young rats drank significantly more water under reduced pressure conditions compared with control conditions, while middle-aged and old rats did not. Urine volume in response to ANG II was lower, while water balance was higher, under conditions of reduced pressure compared with control conditions. Baroreflex control of heart rate was substantially reduced in old rats compared with young and middle-aged animals. In summary, young rats appear to be more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of increased arterial blood pressure on water drinking than are older animals.
Notes
RefSource: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2010 Nov;299(5):R1133-4
PubMed ID
20739604 View in PubMed
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Effect of beta-blockade on baroreflex sensitivity and cardiovascular autonomic function tests in patients with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11507
Source
Eur Heart J. 1994 Nov;15(11):1482-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
K E Airaksinen
M J Niemelä
H V Huikuri
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1994 Nov;15(11):1482-5
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atenolol - blood - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Autonomic Nervous System - drug effects
Baroreflex - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Coronary Disease - drug therapy - physiopathology
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Heart Function Tests
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Metoprolol - blood - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Valsalva Maneuver - drug effects
Abstract
We wished to assess the effects of beta-blockade on baroreflex sensitivity and standard tests of integrity of autonomic nervous function in patients with coronary artery disease, and to determine whether the effects of lipophilic (metoprolol) and hydrophilic (atenolol) beta-blockers differ. Beta-blocking drugs increase spontaneous heart rate variability in healthy subjects and in patients with coronary heart disease, but little is known about their effects on baroreflex sensitivity and heart-rate based tests of autonomic integrity. In a randomly allocated double-blind crossover study with three 2-week treatment periods, metoprolol CR 200 mg once a day, or atenolol 100 mg once a day, or placebo once a day, were administered to 18 male patients with stable coronary artery disease. Baroreflex sensitivity was determined from the natural baroreflex challenge of Valsalva strain. Heart rate reactions to standard stimuli were measured. No significant differences were found between the effects of atenolol and metoprolol. Beta-blockade did not significantly affect the baroreflex sensitivity, but it diminished the Valsalva ratio significantly (P
PubMed ID
7835362 View in PubMed
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Effects of combination antihypertensive therapy on baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in systemic hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10703
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1999 Mar 15;83(6):885-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1999
Author
A. Ylitalo
K E Airaksinen
L. Sellin
H V Huikuri
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland. heikki.huikuri@oulu.fi
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1999 Mar 15;83(6):885-9
Date
Mar-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Baroreflex - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Enalapril - administration & dosage
Felodipine - administration & dosage
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Hydrochlorothiazide - administration & dosage
Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Male
Metoprolol - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Phenylephrine - diagnostic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Earlier studies have shown that cardiovascular autonomic regulation is impaired in untreated or poorly controlled systemic hypertension. The purpose of this double-blind, randomized parallel trial was to evaluate whether improved blood pressure (BP) control can reverse this impairment. The study group consisted of 33 patients (age 45 to 63 years) with poor BP control who received randomized metoprolol or enalapril monotherapy. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was assessed by phenylephrine test and time- and frequency-domain measurements of heart rate variability (HRV) were analyzed from 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings during monotherapy and after 10 weeks of combination therapy with metoprolol + felodipine or enalaril + hydrochlorothiazide to lower casual BP to
PubMed ID
10190404 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.