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The 13th Annual International Symposium in obesity: bariatric/metabolic surgery: how it influences energy balance regulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131119
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Sep;35 Suppl 3:S1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
D. Richard
P. Boisvert
Author Affiliation
Merck Frosst/CIHR Research Chair in Obesity, Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, Canada. Denis.Richard@criucpq.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Sep;35 Suppl 3:S1-2
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bariatric Surgery - methods - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Congresses as topic
Energy Metabolism
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Obesity, Morbid - epidemiology - metabolism - surgery
Patient Selection
PubMed ID
21912380 View in PubMed
Less detail

2006 Canadian clinical practice guidelines on the management and prevention of obesity in adults and children [summary].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164223
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2007
Author
David C W Lau
James D Douketis
Katherine M Morrison
Irene M Hramiak
Arya M Sharma
Ehud Ur
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Julia McFarlane Diabetes Research Centre, Diabetes and Endocrine Research Group, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. dcwlau@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Date
Apr-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Bariatric Surgery
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Bulimia Nervosa - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Diet
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Obesity - classification - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Research - trends
Waist-Hip Ratio
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):139118025434
PubMed ID
17420481 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accelerating development of bariatric surgery in Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125605
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Dec 7-13;108(49):2574-7
Publication Type
Article

Adipose and Circulating CCL18 Levels Associate With Metabolic Risk Factors in Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283211
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Nov;101(11):4021-4029
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Daniel Eriksson Hogling
Paul Petrus
Hui Gao
Jesper Bäckdahl
Ingrid Dahlman
Jurga Laurencikiene
Juan Acosta
Anna Ehrlund
Erik Näslund
Agne Kulyte
Niklas Mejhert
Daniel P Andersson
Peter Arner
Mikael Rydén
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Nov;101(11):4021-4029
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Biomarkers - blood - metabolism
Body mass index
Cell Line
Cells, Cultured
Chemokines, CC - blood - genetics - metabolism - secretion
Cohort Studies
Female
Gene Expression Regulation
Gene Ontology
Humans
Hypertriglyceridemia - etiology
Insulin Resistance
Macrophages - immunology - metabolism - pathology - secretion
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity, Morbid - immunology - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Panniculitis - etiology
Recombinant Proteins - metabolism
Risk factors
Subcutaneous Fat, Abdominal - immunology - metabolism - pathology - secretion
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cardiometabolic complications in obesity may be linked to white adipose tissue (WAT) dysfunction. Transcriptomic studies of Sc WAT have reported that CCL18, encoding the CC chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18), is increased in obesity/insulin resistance but its functional role is unknown.
Our objectives were to determine if CCL18 is secreted from Sc WAT and if secreted and/or serum levels associate with metabolic phenotypes. We also planned to define the primary cellular source and if CCL18 exerts effects on adipocytes.
This is a cohort study.
The study took place in an outpatient academic clinic.
A total of 130 obese women scheduled for bariatric surgery and 35 nonobese controls were included.
Insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp or homeostasis model assessment. CCL18 was analyzed in serum/WAT incubates by ELISA. Effects of recombinant CCL18 was determined in cultures of primary human adipocytes and the monocyte cell line THP-1 differentiated into M0/M1/M2 macrophages.
Association with metabolic risk factors was measured.
CCL18 was secreted from WAT and the levels correlated positively with insulin resistance, Adult Treatment Panel III risk score and plasma triglycerides, independent of body mass index and better than other established adipocytokines. In 80 obese women, S-CCL18 levels were significantly higher in insulin resistant compared with insulin sensitive subjects. In WAT CCL18 mRNA was expressed in macrophages and correlated positively with immune-related genes, particularly those enriched in M2 macrophages. While CCL18 increased cyto-/chemokine expression in M0/M2-THP-1 cells, human adipocytes showed no responses in vitro.
Circulating and WAT-secreted CCL18 correlates with insulin resistance and metabolic risk score. Because CCL18 is macrophage-specific and associates with adipose immune gene expression, it may constitute a marker of WAT inflammation.
PubMed ID
27459538 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adipose tissue morphology predicts improved insulin sensitivity following moderate or pronounced weight loss.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272781
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jun;39(6):893-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
D. Eriksson-Hogling
D P Andersson
J. Bäckdahl
J. Hoffstedt
S. Rössner
A. Thorell
E. Arner
P. Arner
M. Rydén
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jun;39(6):893-8
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipocytes - metabolism - pathology
Adipose Tissue, White - metabolism - pathology
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Cell Enlargement
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology - metabolism - prevention & control
Diet, Reducing
Female
Humans
Inflammation - etiology - metabolism
Male
Obesity - complications - metabolism - pathology - surgery
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sweden
Weight Loss
Abstract
Cross-sectional studies show that white adipose tissue hypertrophy (few, large adipocytes), in contrast to hyperplasia (many, small adipocytes), associates with insulin resistance and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We investigated if baseline adipose cellularity could predict improvements in insulin sensitivity following weight loss.
Plasma samples and subcutaneous abdominal adipose biopsies were examined in 100 overweight or obese individuals before and 10 weeks after a hypocaloric diet (7±3% weight loss) and in 61 obese subjects before and 2 years after gastric by-pass surgery (33±9% weight loss). The degree of adipose tissue hypertrophy or hyperplasia (termed the morphology value) in each individual was calculated on the basis of the relationship between fat cell volume and total fat mass. Insulin sensitivity was determined by homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMAIR).
In both cohorts at baseline, subjects with hypertrophy displayed significantly higher fasting plasma insulin and HOMAIR values than subjects with hyperplasia (P
PubMed ID
25666530 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent bariatric surgery: the Canadian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257199
Source
Semin Pediatr Surg. 2014 Feb;23(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Dafydd A Davies
Jill Hamilton
Elizabeth Dettmer
Catherine Birken
Allison Jeffery
John Hagen
Mehran Anvari
Jacob C Langer
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Dalhousie University, IWK Heath Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Semin Pediatr Surg. 2014 Feb;23(1):31-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bariatric Surgery - methods
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
National Health Programs
Ontario - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology - surgery - therapy
Program Evaluation
Treatment Outcome
Weight Reduction Programs
Abstract
Canada faces a similar epidemic of obesity in their adolescent population as other Western countries. However, the development of programs to treat obesity and manage its sequelae has evolved in a unique way. This is in part due to differences in health care funding, population distribution, public demand, and availability of expertise and resources. In this article, we will describe the evolution of adolescent bariatric care in Canada and describe the current programs and future directions. The focus will be on the province of Ontario, the site of the first adolescent bariatric program in the country.
PubMed ID
24491366 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Alberta population-based prospective evaluation of the quality of life outcomes and economic impact of bariatric surgery (APPLES) study: background, design and rationale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140191
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Raj S Padwal
Sumit R Majumdar
Scott Klarenbach
Dan W Birch
Shahzeer Karmali
Linda McCargar
Konrad Fassbender
Arya M Sharma
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. rpadwal@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:284
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alberta
Bariatric Surgery - economics - methods - psychology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid - diagnosis - surgery
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Postoperative Care - methods
Postoperative Complications - physiopathology
Preoperative Care - methods
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waiting Lists
Weight Loss
Abstract
Extreme obesity affects nearly 8% of Canadians, and is debilitating, costly and ultimately lethal. Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment available; is associated with reductions in morbidity/mortality, improvements in quality of life; and appears cost-effective. However, current demand for surgery in Canada outstrips capacity by at least 1000-fold, causing exponential increases in already protracted, multi-year wait-times. The objectives and hypotheses of this study were as follows: 1. To serially assess the clinical, economic and humanistic outcomes in patients wait-listed for bariatric care over a 2-year period. We hypothesize deterioration in these outcomes over time; 2. To determine the clinical effectiveness and changes in quality of life associated with modern bariatric procedures compared with medically treated and wait-listed controls over 2 years. We hypothesize that surgery will markedly reduce weight, decrease the need for unplanned medical care, and increase quality of life; 3. To conduct a 3-year (1 year retrospective and 2 year prospective) economic assessment of bariatric surgery compared to medical and wait-listed controls from the societal, public payor, and health-care payor perspectives. We hypothesize that lower indirect, out of pocket and productivity costs will offset increased direct health-care costs resulting in lower total costs for bariatric surgery.
Population-based prospective cohort study of 500 consecutive, consenting adults, including 150 surgically treated patients, 200 medically treated patients and 150 wait-listed patients. Subjects will be enrolled from the Edmonton Weight Wise Regional Obesity Program (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada), with prospective bi-annual follow-up for 2 years. Mixed methods data collection, linking primary data to provincial administrative databases will be employed. Major outcomes include generic, obesity-specific and preference-based quality of life assessment, patient satisfaction, patient utilities, anthropometric indices, cardiovascular risk factors, health care utilization and direct and indirect costs.
The results will identify the spectrum of potential risks associated with protracted wait times for bariatric care and will quantify the economic, humanistic and clinical impact of surgery from the Canadian perspective. Such information is urgently needed by health-service providers and policy makers to better allocate use of finite resources. Furthermore, our findings should be widely-applicable to other publically-funded jurisdictions providing similar care to the extremely obese.
Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00850356.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20932316 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ambivalence of losing weight after bariatric surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256833
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22876
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christine Warholm
Aud Marie Øien
Målfrid Råheim
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; warstine@hotmail.com.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22876
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Bariatric Surgery - psychology
Body Image - psychology
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Norway
Self Concept
Social Behavior
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
This study is grounded in a phenomenological lifeworld perspective. It aims at providing rich descriptions of lived experience of the process of losing weight after obesity surgery. Two women participated in in-depth interviews four times each during the first postoperative year. Based on the women's experiences, a meaning structure--the ambivalence of losing weight after obesity surgery--was identified across the women's processes of change. This consisted of five core themes: movement and activity--freedom but new demands and old restraints; eating habits and digestion--the complexity of change; appearance--smaller, but looser; social relations--stability and change; and being oneself--vulnerability and self-assurance. These core themes changed over time in terms of dominance. The experience of ambivalence is discussed according to a phenomenological perspective of the body as lived experience.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24480033 View in PubMed
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Antiobesity surgery in Sweden from 1980 to 2005: a population-based study with a focus on mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91524
Source
Ann Surg. 2008 Nov;248(5):777-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Marsk Richard
Freedman Jacob
Tynelius Per
Rasmussen Finn
Näslund Erik
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Richard.Marsk@ds.se
Source
Ann Surg. 2008 Nov;248(5):777-81
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - trends
Cause of Death
Female
Gastric Bypass - trends
Gastroplasty - trends
Humans
Jejunoileal Bypass - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid - mortality - surgery
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Antiobesity surgery reduces mortality, but this reduction is dependent to a great extent on surgical perioperative mortality. Population-based perioperative mortality after antiobesity surgery is not well known. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate mortality after antiobesity surgery in Sweden. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: All patients who underwent antiobesity surgery in Sweden between 1980 and 2005. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All-cause mortality after antiobesity surgery. RESULTS: A total of 12,379 patients (9,614 women) with mean age (+/-SD) of 39.5 +/- 10.4 years underwent 14,768 antiobesity procedures. Mean follow-up time was 10.9 +/- 6.3 years. A total of 751 (6.1%) patients died during the follow-up period and the cumulative 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year mortality was 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5%, respectively. Early cumulative mortality was higher for men and patients older than 50 years of age. Long-term mortality was higher in men than in women (90 vs. 50 per 10,000 person years when excluding early deaths, mortality rate ratio 1.8 (95% CI, 1.5-2.1)). There was no difference in the rates of early mortality when primary procedures were compared with reoperations. Myocardial infarction and malignancy were the most common late causes of death after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Antiobesity surgery can be performed safely in unselected populations of obese patients with low rates of early mortality. Men are at a higher risk of early death, which is carried through over long-term follow-up, and that is why a future specific study of the effect of antiobesity surgery on mortality in men is warranted.
PubMed ID
18948804 View in PubMed
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Association of bariatric surgery with long-term remission of type 2 diabetes and with microvascular and macrovascular complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104186
Source
JAMA. 2014 Jun 11;311(22):2297-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-2014
Author
Lars Sjöström
Markku Peltonen
Peter Jacobson
Sofie Ahlin
Johanna Andersson-Assarsson
Åsa Anveden
Claude Bouchard
Björn Carlsson
Kristjan Karason
Hans Lönroth
Ingmar Näslund
Elisabeth Sjöström
Magdalena Taube
Hans Wedel
Per-Arne Svensson
Kajsa Sjöholm
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
JAMA. 2014 Jun 11;311(22):2297-304
Date
Jun-11-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Blood glucose
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Complications - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - surgery
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - surgery
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Short-term studies show that bariatric surgery causes remission of diabetes. The long-term outcomes for remission and diabetes-related complications are not known.
To determine the long-term diabetes remission rates and the cumulative incidence of microvascular and macrovascular diabetes complications after bariatric surgery.
The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) is a prospective matched cohort study conducted at 25 surgical departments and 480 primary health care centers in Sweden. Of patients recruited between September 1, 1987, and January 31, 2001, 260 of 2037 control patients and 343 of 2010 surgery patients had type 2 diabetes at baseline. For the current analysis, diabetes status was determined at SOS health examinations until May 22, 2013. Information on diabetes complications was obtained from national health registers until December 31, 2012. Participation rates at the 2-, 10-, and 15-year examinations were 81%, 58%, and 41% in the control group and 90%, 76%, and 47% in the surgery group. For diabetes assessment, the median follow-up time was 10 years (interquartile range [IQR], 2-15) and 10 years (IQR, 10-15) in the control and surgery groups, respectively. For diabetes complications, the median follow-up time was 17.6 years (IQR, 14.2-19.8) and 18.1 years (IQR, 15.2-21.1) in the control and surgery groups, respectively.
Adjustable or nonadjustable banding (n = 61), vertical banded gastroplasty (n = 227), or gastric bypass (n = 55) procedures were performed in the surgery group, and usual obesity and diabetes care was provided to the control group.
Diabetes remission, relapse, and diabetes complications. Remission was defined as blood glucose
PubMed ID
24915261 View in PubMed
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