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Bacteriocins in Neisseria meningitidis. Screening of systemic patient strains and pharyngeal isolates from healthy carriers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212575
Source
APMIS. 1996 Mar;104(3):206-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
J. Allunans
K. Bøvre
Author Affiliation
Kaptein W. Wilhelmsen og Frues Mikrobiologiske Institutt, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, Norway.
Source
APMIS. 1996 Mar;104(3):206-12
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteriocins - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Blood - microbiology
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology
Cerebrospinal Fluid - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Humans
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Military Personnel
Moraxella - drug effects
Neisseria - classification - drug effects
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification - metabolism
Norway - epidemiology
Pharynx - microbiology
Plasmids - isolation & purification
Serotyping
Sulfonamides - pharmacology
Abstract
Systemic meningococcal isolates and meningococci from healthy pharyngeal carriers in Norway were screened for production of growth antagonistic substances. Seven (4.9%) of a total of 142 systemic strains and 3 (2.1%) of 140 carrier isolates spontaneously released diffusible growth antagonistic substances. Properties shown by these substances complied with the criteria used in the definition of a bacteriocin. A cluster of producers among systemic strains registered during the first half of 1975 in North Norway (13.5% of the isolates) was observed, coinciding with the peak in incidence of meningococcal disease of the Norwegian epidemic starting in that region. Among more recent isolates, producers occurred at approximately the same rate in systemic strains (2.5%) as in carrier isolates. The meningocin-producing isolates detected were either of serogroup A and generally sulfonamide-resistant, or serogroup B and sulfonamide-sensitive. The group A strains isolated from disease cases in North Norway during the first half of 1975 were mostly sulfonamide-resistant. Except for the producers, all these strains revealed distinctly higher sensitivity to meningocin than did serogroup B sulfonamide-resistant strains, which became predominant among meningococci causing disease in Norway from that time on.
PubMed ID
8611195 View in PubMed
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Fate of Listeria monocytogenes on fully ripened Greek Graviera cheese stored at 4, 12, or 25 degrees C in air or vacuum packages: in situ PCR detection of a cocktail of bacteriocins potentially contributing to pathogen inhibition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151703
Source
J Food Prot. 2009 Mar;72(3):531-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Eleni Giannou
Athanasia Kakouri
Bojana Bogovic Matijasic
Irena Rogelj
John Samelis
Author Affiliation
National Agricultural Research Foundation, Dairy Research Institute, Katsikas, 45221 Ioannina, Greece.
Source
J Food Prot. 2009 Mar;72(3):531-8
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteriocins - isolation & purification
Cheese - microbiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Enterococcus faecium - metabolism
Food Microbiology
Food Packaging - methods
Food Preservation - methods
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - drug effects - growth & development
Oxygen - metabolism
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Risk assessment
Temperature
Time Factors
Vacuum
Abstract
The behavior of Listeria monocytogenes on fully ripened Greek Graviera cheese was evaluated. Three batches (A, B, and C) were tested. Batches A and C were prepared with a commercial starter culture, while in batch B the starter culture was combined with an enterocin-producing Enterococcus faecium Graviera isolate. Cheese pieces were surface inoculated with a five-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes at ca. 3 log CFU/cm2, packed under air or vacuum conditions, stored at 4, 12, or 25 degrees C, and analyzed after 0, 3, 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. L. monocytogenes did not grow on the cheese surface, regardless of storage conditions. However, long-term survival of the pathogen was noted in all treatments, being the highest (P
PubMed ID
19343941 View in PubMed
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