Skip header and navigation

Refine By

58 records – page 1 of 6.

Analysis of Swedish Bordetella pertussis isolates with three typing methods: characterization of an epidemic lineage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149892
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2009 Sep;78(3):297-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
A. Advani
H G J Van der Heide
H O Hallander
F R Mooi
Author Affiliation
Department of bacteriology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control (SMI), S-171 82 Solna, Sweden. reza.advani@smi.se
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2009 Sep;78(3):297-301
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Bordetella pertussis - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Cluster analysis
DNA Fingerprinting - methods
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Humans
Minisatellite Repeats
Molecular Epidemiology - methods
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Whooping Cough - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Three Bordetella pertussis typing methods, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) were compared using a collection of Swedish strains. Of the three typing methods used, PFGE was found to be the most discriminatory. MLVA and MLST were less discriminatory, but may be valuable for strain discrimination when culture is not possible as they are based on PCR. The combination of MLVA/MLST was found to be equally discriminatory as PFGE and should therefore also be considered. The relationship between predominant lineages in Sweden and The Netherlands, characterized by the PFGE type BpSR11 and the allele for the pertussis toxin promoter ptxP3, respectively, was investigated. Linkage was found between the PFGE type BpSR11 and ptxP3 in that all BpSR11 strains carried ptxP3. On the other hand ptxP3 was found in several other PFGE-types. The presence of the ptxP3 allele in different genetic backgrounds may indicate horizontal gene transfer within B. pertussis or homoplasy. Alternatively, this observation may be due to convergence of PFGE types.
PubMed ID
19577594 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic resistance in environmental Escherichia coli - a simple screening method for simultaneous typing and resistance determination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260756
Source
J Water Health. 2014 Dec;12(4):692-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Patricia Colque Navarro
Heriberto Fernandez
Roland Möllby
Laura Otth
Madeleine Tiodolf
Myra Wilson
Inger Kühn
Source
J Water Health. 2014 Dec;12(4):692-701
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Chile
Drinking Water - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - chemistry - drug effects - genetics
Hospitals
Microbial Sensitivity Tests - methods
Norway
Sewage - microbiology
Sweden
Abstract
We describe a simple and standardised screening system (AREB) for surveillance of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment. The system consists of 96 well microplates containing eight sets of breakpoint amounts of 10 different antibiotics. The incubated microplates are read by a desktop scanner and the plate images are analysed by special software that automatically presents the resistance data. The AREB method is combined with a rapid typing method, the PhenePlate system, which yields information on the diversity of the bacteria in the studied samples, and on the possible prevalence of resistant clones. In order to demonstrate the usage of AREB, a comparative study on the resistance situation among 970 Escherichia coli isolates from sewage and recipient water in Sweden, Norway and Chile, was performed. Resistance rates to all antibiotics were markedly higher in hospital sewage than in other samples. Our data indicate that the AREB system is useful for comparing resistance rates among E. coli and other environmental indicator bacteria in different countries/regions. Simple handling and automatic data evaluation, combined with low cost, facilitate large studies involving several thousands of isolates.
PubMed ID
25473978 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of molecular genetic methods in diagnostics and epidemiology of food-borne bacterial pathogens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176690
Source
APMIS. 2004 Nov-Dec;112(11-12):908-29
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susanna Lukinmaa
Ulla-Maija Nakari
Marjut Eklund
Anja Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland.
Source
APMIS. 2004 Nov-Dec;112(11-12):908-29
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Campylobacter jejuni - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Clostridium perfringens - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Databases, Genetic
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Enterobacteriaceae - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Finland - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Molecular Biology - methods
Molecular Epidemiology - methods
Phenotype
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Salmonella enterica - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Yersinia - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Abstract
Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter and Yersinia species, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Listeria monocytogenes and Clostridium perfringens are the bacterial pathogens constituting the greatest burden of food-borne disease in Finland. Several molecular genetic methods have been applied to diagnose, discriminate and survey these bacteria. PCR, PCR-RFLP and PFGE are the most widely and successfully used. However, these methods are unable to replace conventional and internationally standardised phenotyping. Electronic database libraries of the different genomic profiles will enable continuous surveillance of infections and detection of possible infection clusters at an early stage. Furthermore, whole-genome sequence data have opened up new insights into epidemiological surveillance. Laboratory-based surveillance performed in a timely manner and exploiting adequate methods, and co-operation at local, national and international levels are among the key elements in preventing food-borne diseases. This paper reviews different applications of molecular genetic methods for investigating enteric bacterial pathogens and gives examples of the methods successfully used in diagnostics and epidemiological studies in Finland.
PubMed ID
15638843 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bacterial findings in optimised sampling and characterisation of S. aureus in chronic rhinosinusitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280972
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 Jan;274(1):311-319
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Ulrica Thunberg
Bo Söderquist
Svante Hugosson
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 Jan;274(1):311-319
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Male
Maxillary Sinus - microbiology
Middle Aged
Nasal Cavity - microbiology
Rhinitis - microbiology - physiopathology
Sinusitis - microbiology - physiopathology
Specimen Handling - methods
Staphylococcal Infections - microbiology - physiopathology
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Sweden
Abstract
The bacterial spectrum in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is clinically relevant. This study aimed to compare two sampling techniques and to characterise Staphylococcus aureus isolated from CRS patients. Bacterial specimens were collected from the nares and maxillary sinus in 42 CRS patients and from the nares in 57 healthy controls. Maxillary sinus sampling was performed in two ways in each patient: with a cotton-tipped aluminium swab through the enlarged sinus ostium, and with a protected brush. S. aureus was characterised by DNA-sequencing of the repeat region of the S. aureus protein A gene, spa typing. The protected brush technique was superior to the cotton-tipped aluminium swab in reducing contamination rate. However, the two sampling methods were consistent in terms of clinically relevant bacterial findings, and the easy-to-handle cotton-tipped swab can still be recommended when culturing the maxillary sinus. Patients showed a significantly higher presence of S. aureus in the nares compared with healthy controls, and healthy controls showed a significantly higher presence of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the nares compared with patients. The spa types were identical for the nares and maxillary sinus in all patients except one. The sampling techniques showed equivalent results, indicating a low risk of unnecessary antibiotic treatment when using the easy-to-handle cotton-tipped aluminium swab. The high rate of identical spa types of S. aureus isolated from the nares and maxillary sinus of CRS patients might indicate colonisation of the maxillary sinus from the nares.
Notes
Cites: Rhinology. 2010 Dec;48(4):433-721442080
Cites: Rhinol Suppl. 2012 Mar;(23):3 p preceding table of contents, 1-29822764607
Cites: Braz J Otorhinolaryngol. 2010 Sep-Oct;76(5):548-5120963334
Cites: Acta Derm Venereol. 2000 Sep-Oct;80(5):321-811200827
Cites: Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2014 Oct;271(10):2729-3624604680
Cites: Anaerobe. 2006 Feb;12(1):5-1216701606
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2005 Dec;5(12):751-6216310147
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2009 Jan;63(1):32-4119001453
Cites: Laryngoscope. 2011 May;121(5):1085-9121520128
Cites: Rhinology. 2005 Sep;43(3):162-816218508
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2008 Nov;14(11):1048-5619040477
Cites: Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 2005 Dec;38(6):1215-36, ix16326180
Cites: J Med Microbiol. 2005 Jun;54(Pt 6):595-715888469
Cites: Allergy. 2001 Nov;56(11):1034-4111703215
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014 Mar;133(3):640-53.e424290275
Cites: J Intern Med. 2012 Aug;272(2):133-4322640264
Cites: Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1998 Nov;107(11 Pt 1):942-59823843
Cites: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2003 Sep;129(3 Suppl):S1-3212958561
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 1997 Jul;10(3):505-209227864
Cites: Allergy. 2011 Sep;66(9):1216-2321605125
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Dec;114(6 Suppl):155-21215577865
Cites: Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Jun;19(3):199-20321358332
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2016 Jul;35(7):1059-6827086363
Cites: J Otolaryngol. 1996 Aug;25(4):249-568863213
Cites: Verh K Acad Geneeskd Belg. 2008;70(5-6):305-2219725391
Cites: Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1993;250 Suppl 1:S3-68476583
Cites: Am J Rhinol. 2004 Jan-Feb;18(1):15-2115035566
Cites: Allergy. 2005 May;60(5):583-60115813802
Cites: Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2006 Nov;6(6):487-9417049142
Cites: World Allergy Organ J. 2010 Aug;3(8):223-823282714
Cites: APMIS. 2015 Jan;123(1):37-4425131615
Cites: Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2015 Jul;15(7):4126143392
Cites: Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2006 Oct;132(10):1099-10117043258
Cites: Allergy. 2011 Apr;66(4):549-5521087214
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2000 Aug;106(2):213-2710932063
Cites: Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2003 Nov;3(6):523-3114531975
Cites: Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2013 Sep-Oct;27(5):387-9524119602
Cites: Rhinology. 2004 Dec;42(4):213-815626254
Cites: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2004 Sep;131(3):200-615365536
Cites: Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol Suppl. 1995 Oct;167:22-307574266
PubMed ID
27538736 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can MLVA Differentiate among Endemic-Like MRSA Isolates with Identical Spa-Type in a Low-Prevalence Region?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274591
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(2):e0148772
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Anita Blomfeldt
Abdullahi Abdi Hasan
Hege Vangstein Aamot
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(2):e0148772
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Endemic Diseases
Evolution, Molecular
Humans
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Minisatellite Repeats
Molecular Epidemiology
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Staphylococcal Protein A - genetics
Time Factors
Abstract
The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Norway is low, but an endemic-like MRSA clone with Staphylococcal protein A (spa)-type t304 has been established especially in nursing homes in the Oslo region causing several large outbreaks. The challenge was that spa-typing and the gold standard Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) were inadequate in discriminating isolates in outbreak investigations. Additional higher resolution genotyping methods were needed. The aims of this study were a) to evaluate whether Multiple-Locus Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) could differentiate within the PFGE clusters between epidemiologically related and unrelated endemic-like ST8-MRSA-IV-t304-PVL-neg (MRSA-t304) isolates and b) investigate the evolution of the endemic-like MRSA-t304 clone over a 15-year time period. All MRSA-t304 isolates detected in the region from 1998 through April 2013 were included. In total, 194 of 197 isolates were available for PFGE and MLVA analyses. PFGE results on isolates from 1998-2010 have been published previously. Two PFGE clusters subdivided into eight MLVA types were detected. One major outbreak clone (PFGE cluster C2/ MLVA type MT5045) appeared from 2004 to 2011 causing long-lasting and large outbreaks in seven nursing homes and one hospital. Five new MLVA types (N = 9 isolates) differing in only one VNTR compared to the outbreak clone C2/MT5045 were detected, but only one (C2/MT5044) was seen after 2011. We suggest that MLVA can replace PFGE analysis, but MLVA may not be the optimal method in this setting as it did not discriminate between all epidemiologically unrelated isolates. The results may indicate that all eight outbreaks in different locations within the PFGE C2 cluster may be branches of one large regional outbreak. The major outbreak strain C2/MT5045 may now, however, be under control, extinguished or has moved geographically.
Notes
Cites: J Hosp Infect. 2014 Oct;88(2):72-725085462
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 May 6;111(18):6738-4324753569
Cites: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2015 Jul;36(7):777-8525998499
Cites: Future Microbiol. 2015;10(7):1155-6226173807
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2003 Apr;41(4):1574-8512682148
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2007 Oct;13 Suppl 3:1-4617716294
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2008 Feb;46(2):832-318077637
Cites: PLoS One. 2009;4(4):e508219343175
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Apr;31(4):505-1121789605
Cites: Lancet Infect Dis. 2013 Feb;13(2):130-623158674
Cites: J Travel Med. 2013 Sep-Oct;20(5):283-823992570
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Sep 17;133(17):1800-124042289
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Sep 17;133(17):1819-2324042294
Cites: BMC Res Notes. 2013;6:54824359724
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2014 Mar;58(5):609-1824336829
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2015;20(17). pii: 2111225955776
PubMed ID
26859765 View in PubMed
Less detail

A case of wound dual infection with Pasteurella dagmatis and Pasteurella canis resulting from a dog bite -- limitations of Vitek-2 system in exact identification of Pasteurella species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129404
Source
Eur J Med Res. 2011 Dec 2;16(12):531-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2011
Author
T. Akahane
M. Nagata
T. Matsumoto
T. Murayama
A. Isaka
T. Kameda
M. Fujita
K. Oana
Y. Kawakami
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Clinical Laboratories, Azumino Red Cross Hospital, Japan.
Source
Eur J Med Res. 2011 Dec 2;16(12):531-6
Date
Dec-2-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Bites and Stings - complications - microbiology
Cefazolin - therapeutic use
Cephalosporins - therapeutic use
Dogs
Female
Humans
Pasteurella - classification - isolation & purification
Pasteurella Infections - drug therapy - etiology - microbiology
Wound Infection - etiology - microbiology
Abstract
Pasteurella species, widely known as indigenous organisms in the oral and gastrointestinal floras of many wild and domestic animals, are important pathogens in both animals and humans. Human infections due to Pasteurella species are in most cases associated with infected injuries following animal bites. We encountered a rare case of dual infections caused by different two Pasteurella species occurred in a previously healthy 25-year-old female sustaining injury by a dog-bite.
Exudates from the open wound of her dog-bite site, together with the saliva of the dog were submitted for bacteriological examination. Predominantly appearing grayish-white smooth colonies with almost the same colonial properties but slightly different glistening grown on chocolate and sheep blood agar plates were characterized morphologically by Gram's stain, biochemically by automated instrument using Vitek 2 system using GN cards together with commercially available kit system, ID-Test HN-20 rapid panels, and genetically by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of the organism using a Taq DyeDeoxy Terminator Cycle Sequencing and a model 3100 DNA sequencer instrument.
The causative isolates from the dog-bite site were finally identified as P. canis and P. dagmatis from the findings of the morphological, cultural, and biochemical properties together with the comparative sequences of the 16S rRNA genes. Both the isolates were highly susceptible to many antibiotics and the patient was successfully treated with the administration of so-called the first generation cephalosporin, cefazolin followed by so-called the third generation cephalosporin, cefcapene pivoxil. The isolate from the dog was subsequently identified as P. canis, the same species as the isolate from the patient.
To the best of our knowledge, this was the second report of a dual infection with Pasteurella species consisting of P. dagmatis and P. canis resulting from a dog-bite, followed by the first report of dual infections due to P. dagmatis and P. multocida in 1988. Our isolate finally identified as P. dagmatis was misidentified as P. pneumotripica by means of the Vitek 2 system. The species name "P. dagmatis" was not included in the database of the system. It is also important for routine clinical microbiology laboratories to know the limitation of the automated Vitek 2 system for the accurate identification of Pasteurella species especially P. dagmatis. It should be emphasized that there still exists much room for improvement in Vitek 2 system. Significant improvement of Vitek 2 system especially in the identification of Pasteurella species is urgently desired.
Notes
Cites: South Med J. 2001 Oct;94(10):1033-511702818
Cites: Int J Infect Dis. 2010 Sep;14 Suppl 3:e242-520116315
Cites: Rocky Mt Med J. 1968 Nov;65(11):45-65749275
Cites: Am J Public Health Nations Health. 1970 Jun;60(6):1109-174915720
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1972 Feb;76(2):275-85061893
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1978 Feb;7(2):223-31632349
Cites: Medicine (Baltimore). 1984 May;63(3):133-546371440
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1987;19(4):385-933313679
Cites: Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1988 Apr;7(2):203-43134217
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1992 Nov;30(11):2984-71452670
Cites: Pathology. 1993 Oct;25(4):379-848165003
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1995 Apr;20(4):1055-77795051
Cites: Int J Syst Bacteriol. 1997 Jul;47(3):693-79226902
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Jan 14;340(2):85-929887159
Cites: J Comp Pathol. 1958 Jul;68(3):315-2313563681
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2005 Aug;43(8):4272-416081998
Cites: Arch Med Res. 2006 Oct;37(7):914-616971236
Cites: Rev Med Interne. 2006 Oct;27(10):803-416978746
Cites: Emerg Med Australas. 2008 Dec;20(6):458-6719125823
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2009 Nov;65(3):347-819765934
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Jan;33(1):202-47699042
Cites: J Clin Pathol. 2004 Feb;57(2):210-214747455
PubMed ID
22112359 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterisation of Chlamydia trachomatis by ompA sequencing and multilocus sequence typing in a Swedish county before and after identification of the new variant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147907
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2010 Feb;86(1):56-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Margaretha Jurstrand
Linus Christerson
Markus Klint
Hans Fredlund
Magnus Unemo
Björn Herrmann
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro SE-70185, Sweden. margareta.jurstrand@orebroll.se
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2010 Feb;86(1):56-60
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - classification - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Female
Female Urogenital Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Genetic Loci
Genotype
Humans
Male
Male Urogenital Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Middle Aged
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2006 a new variant of Chlamydia trachomatis (nvCT), with a deletion in the cryptic plasmid, was reported in Sweden. This deletion included the targets for the genetic diagnostic systems used in many clinical laboratories and resulted in thousands of false-negative results. The aim of this study was to characterise consecutive Chlamydia tissue culture-positive samples from 2006 in Orebro County, after identification of the nvCT, and to compare the results from samples collected in the same county in 1999-2000. The study also aimed to evaluate the discriminatory capacity of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) compared with ompA sequencing.
ompA sequencing and MLST was used to characterise 100 consecutive Chlamydia tissue culture-positive samples.
A significant (p
Notes
Erratum In: Sex Transm Infect. 2010 Jun;86(3):250
PubMed ID
19837730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of Salmonella associated with pig ear dog treats in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192696
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2001 Nov;39(11):3962-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
C. Clark
J. Cunningham
R. Ahmed
D. Woodward
K. Fonseca
S. Isaacs
A. Ellis
C. Anand
K. Ziebell
A. Muckle
P. Sockett
F. Rodgers
Author Affiliation
National Laboratory for Enteric Pathogens, National Microbiology Laboratory, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3E 3R2. Clifford_Clark@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2001 Nov;39(11):3962-8
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Animal Feed - microbiology
Animals
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Bacteriophage Typing
Cattle
Disease Outbreaks
Dogs
Ear - microbiology
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Humans
Incidence
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Salmonella enterica - classification - isolation & purification
Serotyping
Swine - microbiology
Abstract
In the summer of 1999, the incidence of Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis infections in Alberta rose dramatically. Subsequent laboratory and epidemiological investigations established that an outbreak of human disease caused by this organism was occurring across Canada and was associated with pet treats for dogs produced from processed pig ears. Laboratory investigations using phage typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) established that isolates of Salmonella serotype Infantis from pig ear pet treats and humans exposed to pig ear pet treats comprised a well-defined subset of all isolates analyzed. Of the 53 subtypes of Salmonella serotype Infantis obtained around the time of the outbreak as defined by PFGE and phage typing, only 6 subtypes were associated with both human infection and isolation from pig ears. Together with information from epidemiological studies, these investigations established pig ear pet treats as the cause of the Salmonella serotype Infantis outbreak. The results are consistent with a model in which contaminated pig ear pet treats constitute a long-term, continuing vehicle for infection of the human population rather than causing temporally delimited point-source outbreaks. During the course of this outbreak, several other Salmonella serotypes were also isolated from pet treats, suggesting these products may be an important source of enteric infection in both humans and dogs. Though isolates of Salmonella serotypes other than Salmonella serotype Infantis from pet treats were also subjected to PFGE and phage typing, no link with human disease could be definitively established, and the contribution of pig ear pet treats to human disease remains unclear. Elimination of bacterial contamination from pet treats is required to reduce the risk of infection from these products.
Notes
Cites: Nord Vet Med. 1984 Sep-Oct;36(9-10):317-236393051
Cites: J Clin Pathol. 1956 May;9(2):94-12713332068
Cites: Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1988 Mar 12;14(10):42-33242871
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Sep 1;136(5):611-61442724
Cites: Acta Vet Scand. 1992;33(4):253-601488941
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2128-337529248
Cites: World Health Stat Q. 1997;50(1-2):30-509282385
Cites: World Health Stat Q. 1997;50(1-2):57-669282387
Cites: World Health Stat Q. 1997;50(1-2):81-99282390
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1997 Aug;119(1):15-239287938
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2977-809350772
Cites: BMJ. 1999 Apr 17;318(7190):1046-5010205103
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Jun;122(3):497-50410459655
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):607-2510511517
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1987 Jun;98(3):277-843595746
PubMed ID
11682515 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates from domestically acquired infections in Finland by phage typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, PFGE and MLVA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270445
Source
BMC Microbiol. 2015;15:131
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Taru Lienemann
Aino Kyyhkynen
Jani Halkilahti
Kaisa Haukka
Anja Siitonen
Source
BMC Microbiol. 2015;15:131
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Bacteriophage Typing
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Finland
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Minisatellite Repeats
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Phylogeny
Salmonella Infections - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Abstract
Salmonella enterica spp. enterica serotype Typhimurium (STM) is the most common agent of domestically acquired salmonellosis in Finland. Subtyping methods which allow the characterization of STM are essential for effective laboratory-based STM surveillance and for recognition of outbreaks. This study describes the diversity of Finnish STM isolates using phage typing, antimicrobial susceptible testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and compares the discriminatory power and the concordance of these methods.
A total of 375 sporadic STM isolates were analysed. The isolates were divided into 31 definite phage (DT) types, dominated by DT1 (47 % of the isolates), U277 (9 % of the isolates) and DT104 (8 % of the isolates). Of all the isolates, 62 % were susceptible to all the 12 antimicrobials tested and 11 % were multidrug resistant. Subtyping resulted in 83 different XbaI-PFGE profiles and 111 MLVA types. The three most common XbaI-PFGE profiles (STYM1, STYM7 and STYM8) and one MLVA profile with three single locus variants accounted for 56 % and 49 % of the STM isolates, respectively. The studied isolates showed a genetic similarity of more than 70 % by XbaI-PFGE. In MLVA, 71 % of the isolates lacked STTR6 and 77 % missed STTR10p loci. Nevertheless, the calculated Simpson's diversity index for XbaI-PFGE was 0.829 (95 % CI 0.792-0.865) and for MLVA 0.867 (95 % CI 0.835-0.898). However, the discriminatory power of the 5-loci MLVA varied among the phage types. The highest concordance of the results was found between XbaI-PFGE and phage typing (adjusted Wallace coefficient was 0.833 and adjusted Rand coefficient was 0.627).
In general, the calculated discriminatory power was higher for genotyping methods (MLVA and XbaI-PFGE) than for phenotyping methods (phage typing). Overall, comparable diversity indices were calculated for PFGE and MLVA (both DI?>?0.8). However, MLVA was phage type dependent providing better discrimination of the most common phage types. Furthermore, 5-loci MLVA was a less laborious method and easier to interpret than XbaI-PFGE. Thus, the laboratory-based surveillance of the Finnish human STM infections has been conducted with a combination of phage typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and 5-loci MLVA since January 2014.
Notes
Cites: BMC Bioinformatics. 2004 Jan 12;5:414715089
Cites: J Microbiol Methods. 2004 Nov;59(2):163-7215369852
Cites: J Hyg (Lond). 1977 Apr;78(2):297-300321679
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Nov;26(11):2465-63069867
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1992;70(6):705-141486666
Cites: Microbiol Mol Biol Rev. 1998 Jun;62(2):275-939618442
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2005;10(6):E050630.116783108
Cites: J Food Prot. 2006 Aug;69(8):1814-2216924904
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2007 Feb;45(2):536-4317151203
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2007 Mar;12(3):E070315.517439789
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2007 Aug;135(6):900-717335629
Cites: J Appl Microbiol. 2007 Sep;103(3):565-7217714389
Cites: Methods Mol Biol. 2007;394:177-21118363237
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2009 Mar 12;14(10). pii: 1914719317986
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2000 Jul;46(1):7-1010882682
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2001 Nov-Dec;7(6):996-100311747728
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2004 Apr;132(2):263-7215061501
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2009;14(15). pii: 1917419371515
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2009 Jun;47(6):1934-819386855
Cites: Methods Mol Biol. 2009;551:59-7019521867
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2009 Aug;47(8):2369-7619535521
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2010 Mar 15;50(6):882-920158401
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2010 May;76(10):3398-40020348301
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2010 Aug 15;142(1-2):67-7320573417
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Jan;69(1):1-621146707
Cites: Curr Microbiol. 2011 Mar;62(3):1034-821104081
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2011 May 5;149(3-4):430-621208755
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2011 Jul 15;204(2):263-721673037
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2011 Aug;139(8):1246-5320943003
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Aug 18;365(7):601-1021848461
Cites: Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2011 Oct;8(10):1083-821612424
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2011 Nov;77(22):7877-8521856826
Cites: Commun Dis Intell Q Rep. 2012 Mar;36(1):101-623153086
Cites: Commun Dis Intell Q Rep. 2012 Sep;36(3):E281-523186240
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2013;18(4):2038523369388
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2013 Jul;216(4):428-3422981706
Cites: Jpn J Infect Dis. 2013;66(3):180-823698477
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e8405524391880
Cites: J Appl Microbiol. 2014 Apr;116(4):1044-5424517207
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2011 Jul;139(7):1050-920822575
Cites: Res Microbiol. 2014 Sep;165(7):526-3025049166
Cites: Methods Mol Biol. 2015;1301:191-21025862058
PubMed ID
26129826 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coincidental detection of the first outbreak of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae colonisation in a primary care hospital, Finland, 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267364
Source
Euro Surveill. 2015;20(26)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
M. Kanerva
K. Skogberg
K. Ryynänen
A. Pahkamäki
J. Jalava
J. Ollgren
E. Tarkka
O. Lyytikäinen
Source
Euro Surveill. 2015;20(26)
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Proteins - secretion
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299
Humans
Klebsiella Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Klebsiella pneumoniae - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Primary Health Care
Rectum - microbiology
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
beta-Lactamases - secretion
Abstract
In Finland, occurrence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-KP) has previously been sporadic and related to travel. We describe the first outbreak of colonisation with KPC-KP strain ST512; it affected nine patients in a 137-bed primary care hospital. The index case was detected by chance when a non-prescribed urine culture was taken from an asymptomatic patient with suprapubic urinary catheter in June 2013. Thereafter, all patients on the 38-bed ward were screened until two screening rounds were negative and extensive control measures were performed. Eight additional KPC-KP-carriers were found, and the highest prevalence of carriers on the ward was nine of 38. All other patients hospitalised on the outbreak ward between 1 May and 10 June and 101 former roommates of KPC-KP carriers since January had negative screening results. Two screening rounds on the hospital's other wards were negative. No link to travel abroad was detected. Compared with non-carriers, but without statistical significance, KPC-KP carriers were older (83 vs 76 years) and had more often received antimicrobial treatment within the three months before screening (9/9 vs 90/133). No clinical infections occurred during the six-month follow-up. Early detection, prompt control measures and repetitive screening were crucial in controlling the outbreak.
PubMed ID
26159309 View in PubMed
Less detail

58 records – page 1 of 6.