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[A comparative analysis of genomes of virulent and avirulent strains of Vibrio cholerae O139].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179953
Source
Mol Gen Mikrobiol Virusol. 2004;(2):11-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
G A Eroshenko
A V Osin
E Iu Shchelkanova
N I Smirnova
Author Affiliation
Mikrob Russian Research Anti-Plague Institute, Saratov.
Source
Mol Gen Mikrobiol Virusol. 2004;(2):11-6
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Triphosphatases - genetics
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Toxins - genetics
Cholera - microbiology
Cholera Toxin - genetics
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics
Genome, Bacterial
Humans
Membrane Glycoproteins
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Proteins - genetics
Russia
Serine Endopeptidases - genetics
Transcription Factors - genetics
Vibrio cholerae O139 - genetics - pathogenicity
Virulence Factors - genetics
Water Microbiology
Abstract
A comparative analysis of the genome of V. cholerae O139 strains isolated in Russia's territory from patients with cholera and from the environment showed essential differences in their structures. The genome of clinical strains possessed all tested genes associated with virulence (ctxAB, zot, ace, rstC, rtxA, hap, toxR and toxT) and the at-tRS site for the CTXp phage DNA integration. As for the O139 V. cholerae chromosome strains isolated from water, 70% of the studied genes (ctxAB, zot, ace, rstC, tcpA, and toxT) and the attRS sequence were not detected in them. A lack of the key virulence genes in O139-serogroup "water" vibrios, including genes of toxin-coregulated adhesion pili. (that are receptors for the CTXp phage), and of the attachment site of the above phage are indicative of that the O139 V. cholerae strains isolated from open water sources located in different Russia's regions are epidemically negligible.
PubMed ID
15164715 View in PubMed
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Beta-haemolytic group A, C and G streptococcal infections in Western Norway: a 15-year retrospective survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269114
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2015 Feb;21(2):171-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
O. Oppegaard
H. Mylvaganam
B R Kittang
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2015 Feb;21(2):171-8
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antigens, Bacterial - genetics
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Sex Factors
Streptococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Streptococcus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Pyogenic streptococci cause significant morbidity and mortality, and the incidence of invasive group C and G streptococcal disease appears to be increasing. In this retrospective study we describe the epidemiological characteristics of invasive group A, C and G, along with non-invasive group C and G streptococcal infections in Western Norway from 1999 to 2013. A total of 512 invasive streptococcal infections were identified, of these 297 (58%) were group A (GAS), 24 (5%) group C (GCS) and 188 (37%) group G streptococci (GGS). In the non-invasive group, 4935 GCS and GGS-infections were identified. GCS and GGS were treated as one group (GCGS) for statistical purposes. All microbial categories displayed increasing incidence with age, seasonal variation and a male predominance. The incidence of invasive GCGS infections increased significantly from 1.4/100,000 inhabitants in 1999 to 6.3/100,000 in 2013 (p
PubMed ID
25658557 View in PubMed
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cagA, vacA and iceA virulence genes of Helicobacter pylori isolates of children in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32423
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2000 Oct;19(10):790-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
J. Karhukorpi
Y. Yan
K L Kolho
H. Rautelin
M. Lahti
A. Sirviö
K. Riipinen
H. Lindahl
M. Verkasalo
R. Fagerholm
R. Karttunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Oulu, Finland. Jari.Karhukorpi@oulu.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2000 Oct;19(10):790-3
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, Bacterial
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Helicobacter Infections - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - genetics - pathogenicity
Humans
Male
Virulence
Abstract
cagA, vacA s and m genotypes and iceA alleles were analyzed from Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from 17 Finnish children and 32 children of non-Finnish origin living in Finland. Twelve children in the latter group were eastern European and 15 were of African origin. Only three children of non-Finnish origin were born in Finland. The vacA sla subtype was more prevalent in the isolates from Finnish children than African children (76% vs. 7%, P
PubMed ID
11117646 View in PubMed
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Characterisation of Chlamydia trachomatis by ompA sequencing and multilocus sequence typing in a Swedish county before and after identification of the new variant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147907
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2010 Feb;86(1):56-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Margaretha Jurstrand
Linus Christerson
Markus Klint
Hans Fredlund
Magnus Unemo
Björn Herrmann
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro SE-70185, Sweden. margareta.jurstrand@orebroll.se
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2010 Feb;86(1):56-60
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - classification - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Female
Female Urogenital Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Genetic Loci
Genotype
Humans
Male
Male Urogenital Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Middle Aged
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2006 a new variant of Chlamydia trachomatis (nvCT), with a deletion in the cryptic plasmid, was reported in Sweden. This deletion included the targets for the genetic diagnostic systems used in many clinical laboratories and resulted in thousands of false-negative results. The aim of this study was to characterise consecutive Chlamydia tissue culture-positive samples from 2006 in Orebro County, after identification of the nvCT, and to compare the results from samples collected in the same county in 1999-2000. The study also aimed to evaluate the discriminatory capacity of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) compared with ompA sequencing.
ompA sequencing and MLST was used to characterise 100 consecutive Chlamydia tissue culture-positive samples.
A significant (p
Notes
Erratum In: Sex Transm Infect. 2010 Jun;86(3):250
PubMed ID
19837730 View in PubMed
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Characterization of epidemic and nonepidemic Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A strains from Sudan and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37611
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Aug;28(8):1711-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
M A Salih
D. Danielsson
A. Bäckman
D A Caugant
M. Achtman
P. Olcén
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Sudan.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Aug;28(8):1711-9
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigenic Variation - genetics
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Fimbriae, Bacterial - immunology
Genotype
Humans
Lipopolysaccharides - genetics
Meningitis - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - genetics - immunology
Phenotype
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Restriction Mapping
Sudan - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A random selection of 25 strains isolated during an epidemic caused by serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis in Sudan (1988), 3 preepidemic meningococcal strains (1985), and 26 serogroup A strains isolated from sporadic cases of meningitis in Sweden (1973 to 1987) were assessed for multilocus enzyme genotypes (ETs), DNA restriction enzyme patterns, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharides, pilus formation, and antibiograms. All of the 25 Sudanese epidemic isolates and 22 of the Swedish strains were of the same or closely related ETs (ETs 3, 4, and 5), corresponding to clone III-1, which has been responsible for two pandemic waves in the last three decades. The earlier pandemic involved Scandinavia, and the last one caused an outbreak during the pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia (August 1987), spreading to Sudan, Chad, and Ethiopia. The three Sudanese preepidemic isolates (1985) were clone IV-1 (sulfonamide susceptible), which has been resident in the African meningitis belt for the last 25 years. The uniformity of clone III-1 strains (all sulfonamide resistant) from Sudan and Sweden was confirmed by DNA restriction enzyme patterns. ETs 3, 4, and 5 from Sudan and Sweden had 86 to 100% similarity to a Swedish clone III-1 reference strain, whereas ETs 1, 2, 6, and 7 showed 50 to 80% similarity. Class 1 protein for clone III-1 showed serosubtype antigens P1.9 and P1.x, whereas ET6 strains (clone IV-1) had serosubtype P1.7. Lipopolysaccharides were variable in the Sudanese and Swedish strains. Pili were expressed in all clone III-1 isolates from Sudan and Sweden but in none of the clone IV-1 isolates (Sudan, 1985).
PubMed ID
1975593 View in PubMed
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Characterization of ompA genotypes by sequence analysis of DNA from all detected cases of Chlamydia trachomatis infections during 1 year of contact tracing in a Swedish County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180680
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2004 Apr;42(4):1641-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Maria Lysén
Anders Osterlund
Carl-Johan Rubin
Tina Persson
Ingrid Persson
Björn Herrmann
Author Affiliation
Section of Clinical Bacteriology, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2004 Apr;42(4):1641-7
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - classification - genetics
Contact Tracing
Female
Female Urogenital Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Male
Male Urogenital Diseases
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In this study we aimed to characterize the ompA gene by sequencing DNA from all detected cases of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in a Swedish county during 2001, in order to improve the efficiency of contact tracing. Approximately 990 bp of the ompA gene was amplified, and sequence analysis was achieved in 678 (94%) of 725 C. trachomatis-positive cases in this unselected population. The most prevalent genotype was serotype E (39%), followed by F (21%), G (11%), D (9%), K (9%), J (7%), H (2%), B (1%), and Ia (1%). Serotype E was found in five genotype variants, with the reference sequence comprising 96% of all E cases. Serotype D was the most variable, and of seven sequence variants, three were identified as recombinants with serotype E. Altogether 29 genetic variants were detected, and mutations and recombination events are discussed. Clinical manifestations were not associated with genotypes. Sequence variation was linked to sexual networks identified by contact tracing and improved epidemiological knowledge but was of limited benefit.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15071019 View in PubMed
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Characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from balanoposthitis patients presumably transmitted by penile-oral sexual intercourse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145780
Source
Curr Microbiol. 2010 Aug;61(2):101-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Masaaki Minami
Yukio Wakimoto
Masakado Matsumoto
Hideyuki Matsui
Yasue Kubota
Atsushi Okada
Masanori Isaka
Ichiro Tatsuno
Yasuhito Tanaka
Tadao Hasegawa
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Japan.
Source
Curr Microbiol. 2010 Aug;61(2):101-5
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Antigens, Bacterial - genetics
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Balanitis - microbiology
Carrier Proteins - genetics
DNA Fingerprinting
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Exotoxins - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Serotyping
Sexual Behavior
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - diagnosis
Streptococcal Infections - diagnosis - microbiology
Streptococcus pyogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
Streptococcus pyogenes is indigenous to the human pharynx and causes acute pharyngitis. Balanoposthitis is an inflammatory disease of the glans and the foreskin. However, balanoposthitis caused by S. pyogenes is not widely recognized as a sexually transmitted disease. In addition, bacteriological features of the isolates causing balanoposthitis are unclear. The four S. pyogenes strains isolated from adult balanoposthitis were examined. We performed emm typing, T antigen typing, RAPD assay, PCR assay for the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin-related genes and antibiotic-resistant genes, and antibiotic susceptibility assay. All four strains were suspected to be transmitted by penile-oral sexual intercourse, were found to be different by genetic analysis, and also harbored some antibiotic-resistant factors. We propose that S. pyogenes should be considered as a causative agent of sexually transmitted disease. The drug resistant S. pyogenes must be taken into account when balanoposthitis patients are treated with antibiotic.
PubMed ID
20107992 View in PubMed
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Chlamydia psittaci in Swedish wetland birds: a risk to zoonotic infection?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116448
Source
Avian Dis. 2012 Dec;56(4):737-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Maria Blomqvist
Linus Christerson
Jonas Waldenström
Björn Herrmann
Björn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Section of Clinical Bacteriology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Avian Dis. 2012 Dec;56(4):737-40
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Bird Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Birds
Chlamydia - genetics - isolation & purification
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - genetics - isolation & purification
Chlamydophila psittaci - genetics - isolation & purification
Cloaca - microbiology
Ducks
Feces - microbiology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Prevalence
Psittacosis - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Sequence Analysis, DNA - veterinary
Sweden - epidemiology
Wetlands
Zoonoses - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Chlamydia psittaci in birds may be transmitted to humans and cause respiratory infections, sometimes as severe disease. Our study investigated the C. psittaci prevalence in migratory birds in Sweden by real-time PCR. Fecal specimens or cloacal swabs were collected from 497 birds from 22 different species, mainly mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), at two bird observatories in Sweden. DNA from C psittaci was found in six (1.2%) birds from three different species. Five of the positive specimens were infected with four novel strains of C. psittaci, based on sequencing of partial 16S rRNA gene and ompA gene, and the sixth was indentified as a recently described Chlamydiaceae-like bacterium. Considering exposure to humans it is concluded that the risk of zoonotic infection is low.
PubMed ID
23397847 View in PubMed
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Chlamydia trachomatis genotypes and the Swedish new variant among urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis strains in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133032
Source
Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2011;2011:481890
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Suvi Niemi
Eija Hiltunen-Back
Mirja Puolakkainen
Author Affiliation
Haartman Institute, Department of Virology, University of Helsinki, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. suvi.j.niemi@helsinki.fi
Source
Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2011;2011:481890
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Sweden
Abstract
Our aims were to genotype Chlamydia trachomatis strains present in urogenital samples and to investigate the occurrence of the Swedish new variant of C. trachomatis in Finland. We genotyped 160 C. trachomatis positive samples with ompA real-time PCR and analyzed 495 samples for the new variant. The three most prevalent genotypes were E (40%), F (28%), and G (13%). Only two specimens containing bacteria with the variant plasmid were detected. It seems that in Finland the percentage of infections due to genotypes F and G has slightly increased during the last 20 years. Genotypes E and G appear to be more common, and genotypes J/Ja and I/Ia appear to be less common in Europe than in the USA. Although the genotype E was the most common genotype among C. trachomatis strains, the new variant was rarely found in Finland.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21747641 View in PubMed
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63 records – page 1 of 7.