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8 records – page 1 of 1.

Aeromonas salmonicida infection levels in pre- and post-stocked cleaner fish assessed by culture and an amended qPCR assay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282184
Source
J Fish Dis. 2016 Jul;39(7):867-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
S. Gulla
S. Duodu
A. Nilsen
I. Fossen
D J Colquhoun
Source
J Fish Dis. 2016 Jul;39(7):867-77
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aeromonas salmonicida - isolation & purification
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial - veterinary
Fisheries
Furunculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission - veterinary
Norway - epidemiology
Perciformes
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Abstract
Due to increasing resistance to chemical therapeutants, the use of 'cleaner fish' (primarily wrasse, Labridae, species) has become popular in European salmon farming for biocontrol of the salmon louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer). While being efficient de-licers, cleaner fish mortality levels in salmon cages are commonly high, and systemic bacterial infections constitute a major problem. Atypical furunculosis, caused by Aeromonas salmonicida A-layer types V and VI, is among the most common diagnoses reached in clinical investigations. A previously described real-time PCR (qPCR), targeting the A. salmonicida A-layer gene (vapA), was modified and validated for specific and sensitive detection of all presently recognized A-layer types of this bacterium. Before stocking and during episodes of increased mortality in salmon cages, cleaner fish (primarily wild-caught wrasse) were sampled and screened for A. salmonicida by qPCR and culture. Culture indicated that systemic bacterial infections are mainly contracted after salmon farm stocking, and qPCR revealed A. salmonicida prevalences of approximately 4% and 68% in pre- and post-stocked cleaner fish, respectively. This underpins A. salmonicida's relevance as a contributing factor to cleaner fish mortality and emphasizes the need for implementation of preventive measures (e.g. vaccination) if current levels of cleaner fish use are to be continued or expanded.
PubMed ID
26514414 View in PubMed
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Control of transmission of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in a long-term-care facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201971
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 May;20(5):312-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
M. Armstrong-Evans
M. Litt
M A McArthur
B. Willey
D. Cann
S. Liska
S. Nusinowitz
R. Gould
A. Blacklock
D E Low
A. McGeer
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai and Princess Margaret Hospitals, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 May;20(5):312-7
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Disease Reservoirs
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Enterococcus faecium - drug effects - isolation & purification
Female
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Infection Control - economics - methods
Long-Term Care - methods
Male
Nursing Homes
Ontario - epidemiology
Vancomycin - pharmacology
Abstract
To describe the investigation and control of transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in a residential long-term-care (LTC) setting. OUTBREAK INVESTIGATION: A strain of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium not previously isolated in Ontario colonized five residents of a 254-bed LTC facility in Toronto. The index case was identified when VRE was isolated from a urine culture taken after admission to a local hospital. Screening of rectal swabs from all 235 residents identified four others who were colonized with the same strain of E faecium.
Colonized residents were cohorted. VRE precautions were established as follows: gown and gloves for resident contact, restriction of contact between colonized and noncolonized residents, no sharing of personal equipment, and daily double-cleaning of residents' rooms and wheelchairs.
Two colonized residents died of causes unrelated to VRE. Although bacitracin therapy (75,000 units four times a day x 14 days) failed to eradicate carriage in two of three surviving residents, both cleared their carriage within 7 weeks. Repeat rectal swabs from 224 residents (91%) 2 months after isolation precautions were discontinued and from 125 residents (51%) 9 months later identified no new cases. Total cost of investigation and control was $12,061 (Canadian).
VRE may be transmitted in LTC facilities, and colonized LTC residents could become important VRE reservoirs. Control of VRE transmission in LTC facilities can be achieved even with limited resources.
PubMed ID
10349946 View in PubMed
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[Hand-hygiene and sickness among small children attending day care centers. An intervention study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33148
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Aug 2;161(31):4396-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2-1999
Author
M B Ladegaard
V. Stage
Author Affiliation
Odense Kommune, Børne-Ungeforvaltningen.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Aug 2;161(31):4396-400
Date
Aug-2-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Communicable disease control
Denmark - epidemiology
Diarrhea, Infantile - epidemiology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Eye Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Handwashing
Humans
Hygiene
Infant
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of intensified hygiene with frequent handwashing and several educational procedures in day-care centres. The study was conducted as a controlled trial, with an intervention group and an observation group. There was a 34% reduction in expected sickness in children in the intervention group. In the categories diarrhoea and eye-infection there was a significant drop in sickness. We conclude that broad intervention concerning hand-hygiene has a positive effect on sickness in children attending day-care centres.
PubMed ID
10487104 View in PubMed
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[Infection problems connected to child day care centers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35752
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Jun 30;114(17):1936-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1994
Author
K K Lie
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for Samfunnsmedisin Statens Institutt for Folkehelse, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Jun 30;114(17):1936-8
Date
Jun-30-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Humans
Infant
Infection Control
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
International studies show that children in day care centres have approximately twice as many episodes of infectious diseases as children cared for at home, while, according to most studies, children in family day care experience an intermediate number of infections. After some months in day care the risk of infection decreases. The diseases in question are usually transferred from person to person through close physical contact. Children's general mode of behaviour tends to favour such transmission. The risk of infection in pregnant women on the day care staff and among parents is considered. Finally, the author discusses the potential to control infection in a day care setting. Strict rules for isolation of sick children probably have little effect on the spread of the infections. Good routines for washing hands and for changing nappies are considered to be the most important ways of controlling infection in day care centres.
PubMed ID
8079320 View in PubMed
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[Infectious diseases and climate change]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95348
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3178-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Valentiner-Branth Palle
Glismann Steffen Offersen
Mølbak Kåre
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Epidemiologisk Afdeling, DK-2300 København S, Denmark.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3178-81
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Climate
Communicable disease control
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Vectors
Europe - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Insect Vectors
Risk factors
Rodentia
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Climate changes will likely have an impact on the spectrum of infectious diseases in Europe. We may see an increase in vector-borne diseases, diseases spread by rodents such as Hantavirus, and food- and water-borne diseases. As the effects of climate changes are likely to occur gradually, a modern industrialised country such as Denmark will have the opportunity to adapt to the expected changes.
PubMed ID
19857396 View in PubMed
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Lack of transmission of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in three long-term-care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201969
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 May;20(5):341-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
C A Greenaway
M A Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology at the Centre Hospitalier Régionale du Suroît, Valleyfield-de-Salaberry, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1999 May;20(5):341-3
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Enterococcus
Female
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infection Control - standards
Long-Term Care - methods
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Vancomycin
Abstract
Three patients colonized with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus were admitted to one or more of three long-term-care facilities. Six point-prevalence surveys revealed no transmission of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus after a total of 234 days of exposure during which moderately strict infection control measures were implemented. Four of 116 environmental cultures were positive.
PubMed ID
10349951 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.