Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

8 records – page 1 of 1.

[A new zoonosis--investigation of Gardnerella vaginalis disease of fox. III. Epidemiological investigation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4561
Source
Wei Sheng Wu Xue Bao. 1995 Jun;35(3):209-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
Z. Yan
X. Yan
F. Luan
C. Wang
Author Affiliation
Speciality Institute of CAAS, Jilin.
Source
Wei Sheng Wu Xue Bao. 1995 Jun;35(3):209-15
Date
Jun-1995
Language
Chinese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Veterinary - epidemiology
Animals
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
China - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Foxes - microbiology
Gardnerella vaginalis - classification - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vagina - microbiology
Zoonoses - epidemiology
Abstract
By epidemiological investigation to Gardnerella vaginalis disease of fox of civil main farms raising foxes, this disease was showed to be susceptible to silver foxes, arctic foxes, red foxes and color foxes, the disease was mostly transmitted by copulation, infected foxes played the leading role in epidemic of the disease. Investigative results of all farms raising foxes showed infection rate of fox groups was 0.9-21.9%, resulting in abortion rate was 1.5-14.7%, empty rate was 3.2-47.5%. Serious harm was revealed to the disease. By serology and causative agent isolation, we had proved that the disease was able to infect feeder and manager, it belongs to zoonosis. Racoondog. mink and canine infect with the disease besides fox. White mouse, big white rat, gopher, guinea pig and rabbit for laboratory are not infected with the disease.
PubMed ID
7631502 View in PubMed
Less detail

Detection and quantification of Aeromonas salmonicida in fish tissue by real-time PCR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282833
Source
J Fish Dis. 2017 Feb;40(2):231-242
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
S. Bartkova
B. Kokotovic
H F Skall
N. Lorenzen
I. Dalsgaard
Source
J Fish Dis. 2017 Feb;40(2):231-242
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aeromonas salmonicida - genetics - isolation & purification
Animals
Denmark - epidemiology
Furunculosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Oncorhynchus mykiss
Parasitology - methods
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Reproducibility of Results
Sequence Analysis, DNA - veterinary
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
Furunculosis, a septicaemic infection caused by the bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, currently causes problems in Danish seawater rainbow trout production. Detection has mainly been achieved by bacterial culture, but more rapid and sensitive methods are needed. A previously developed real-time PCR assay targeting the plasmid encoded aopP gene of A. salmonicida was, in parallel with culturing, used for the examination of five organs of 40 fish from Danish freshwater and seawater farms. Real-time PCR showed overall a higher frequency of positives than culturing (65% of positive fish by real-time PCR compared to 30% by a culture approach). Also, no real-time PCR-negative samples were found positive by culturing. A. salmonicida was detected by real-time PCR, though not by culturing, in freshwater fish showing no signs of furunculosis, indicating possible presence of carrier fish. In seawater fish examined after an outbreak and antibiotics treatment, real-time PCR showed the presence of the bacterium in all examined organs (1-482 genomic units mg(-1) ). With a limit of detection of 40 target copies (1-2 genomic units) per reaction, a high reproducibility and an excellent efficiency, the present real-time PCR assay provides a sensitive tool for the detection of A. salmonicida.
PubMed ID
27193829 View in PubMed
Less detail

Equine infectious keratitis in Finland: Associated microbial isolates and susceptibility profiles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309319
Source
Vet Ophthalmol. 2020 Jan; 23(1):148-159
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2020
Author
Minna P Mustikka
Thomas S C Grönthal
Elina M Pietilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Vet Ophthalmol. 2020 Jan; 23(1):148-159
Date
Jan-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bacteria - drug effects
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Horse Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Horses
Keratitis - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Male
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To retrospectively describe laboratory findings, treatment, and outcome associated with equine infectious keratitis in Finland.
Medical records of horses diagnosed with infectious keratitis in University of Helsinki Equine Hospital from January 2007 to June 2018 were reviewed.
Forty-seven cases were included. Keratomycosis was diagnosed in 27 eyes and bacterial keratitis in 20 eyes. Aspergillus flavus was the most frequent fungal isolate (9/17, 53%), followed by Cylindrocarpon sp. (3/17, 18%) and Aspergillus fumigatus (2/17, 12%). Susceptibility was tested for 10/11 Aspergillus sp. isolates; all were susceptible to voriconazole while only two were susceptible to amphotericin B. Cylindrocarpon sp. isolates were resistant to both agents. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus was the most frequent bacterial isolate (9/19, 47%), followed by other streptococci (4/19, 21%). All 13 Streptococcus sp. isolates were susceptible to penicillin, and all tested isolates (n = 11) were also susceptible to chloramphenicol. Mean duration of medical treatment was longer in fungal keratitis (38 days) than in bacterial keratitis (25 days) (P 
PubMed ID
31364808 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence and diversity of Arcobacter spp. isolated from the internal organs of spontaneous porcine abortions in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56639
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2002 Mar 1;85(2):159-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2002
Author
Stephen L W On
Tim K Jensen
Vivi Bille-Hansen
Sven E Jorsal
Peter Vandamme
Author Affiliation
Danish Veterinary Laboratory, Bülowsvej 27, DK-1790 V, Copenhagen, Denmark. sto@vetinsk.dk
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2002 Mar 1;85(2):159-67
Date
Mar-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Veterinary - microbiology
Animals
Arcobacter - classification - isolation & purification
Campylobacter - classification - isolation & purification
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Helicobacter - classification - isolation & purification
Kidney - microbiology - pathology
Liver - microbiology - pathology
Phenotype
Phylogeny
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
A study was conducted to determine the prevalence and possible significance of campylobacteria in pig abortions in Denmark. Surface-cauterised liver and kidney samples from 55 aborted pig fetuses submitted to the Danish Veterinary Laboratory were taken and a sensitive isolation procedure used to examine pooled tissue samples for Campylobacter, Arcobacter and Helicobacter spp. Routine microbiological, immunological, and histopathological examinations were also performed to identify concurrent infections or histopathological changes. The abortions tested negative for established abortifacient pathogens (Brucella, Leptospira, PPV, PRRSV), but Arcobacter spp. were recovered from 23/55 abortions. Co-infections with Streptococcus suis, Escherichia coli, and haemolytic streptococci were observed in 7/23 Arcobacter-positive fetuses, and in 4/32 Arcobacter-negative fetuses. Histopathological analyses identified placentitis, pneumonia, hepatitis and encephalitis among the study group. However, no obvious pathologic features were solely associated with Arcobacter-positive cases, nor were Arcobacter-like bacteria observed in tissue samples. Protein profile analyses of the 27 Arcobacter isolates identified 11 as A. cryaerophilus and 10 as A. skirrowii. Six strains could not be classified into any existing species and were phenotypically distinct, thus, potentially representing at least one new species. The identification results showed that multiple taxa could be found in a single fetus, and in distinct aborted fetuses from a single sow. The high prevalence of arcobacters in Danish pig abortions may account for at least some of the >90% of cases in which no established abortifacient agent is detected, but further studies are needed to define the role of each species, especially where co-infections with other bacteria are present.
PubMed ID
11844622 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of esp, encoding the enterococcal surface protein, in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates from hospital patients, poultry, and pigs in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187942
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2002 Nov;40(11):4396
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Anette Marie Hammerum
Lars Bogø Jensen
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2002 Nov;40(11):4396
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Denmark - epidemiology
Enterococcus faecalis - metabolism
Enterococcus faecium - metabolism
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Hospitalization
Humans
Membrane Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Poultry
Poultry Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Prevalence
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Notes
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2001 Mar 20;79(2):155-6911230937
Cites: Infect Immun. 2001 Jul;69(7):4366-7211401975
Cites: Mol Microbiol. 1999 Jul;33(1):208-1910411737
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2002 Apr 15;185(8):1121-711930322
Cites: Infect Immun. 1999 Jan;67(1):193-2009864215
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2001 Oct;67(10):4538-4511571153
PubMed ID
12409442 View in PubMed
Less detail

A recently introduced Dichelobacter nodosus strain caused an outbreak of footrot in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261602
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2014;56:29
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Marianne Gilhuus
Bjørg Kvitle
Trine M L'Abée-Lund
Synnøve Vatn
Hannah J Jørgensen
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2014;56:29
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Dichelobacter nodosus - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - veterinary
Foot Rot - epidemiology - microbiology
Goat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Goats
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Molecular Sequence Data
Norway - epidemiology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Sequence Analysis, DNA - veterinary
Sheep
Sheep Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Virulence
Abstract
In 2008, an outbreak of ovine footrot occurred in Norway. Dichelobacter nodosus isolates collected between 2008 and 2011 have been characterised. Isolates defined as virulent by the gelatin gel test (GG-test) were only found in sheep in Rogaland County, where the severe cases of footrot were registered. The majority (96%) of the virulent isolates belonged to serogroup A. It is suspected that they represent a newly introduced strain, and the aim of the present study was to investigate whether they are genetically similar. Sixty-one virulent isolates from sheep and 116 benign isolates from sheep, cattle and goats were included. Four GG-test virulent isolates from Danish sheep were also included. All isolates were genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and by PCR for pgr variant determination.
The Norwegian virulent isolates were assigned to 8 pulsotypes (PTs), while the benign isolates were assigned to 66 PTs. Thirty-seven (68.5%) of the 54, virulent, serogroup A isolates belonged to the same PT, and included isolates from 2008 through 2011. Isolates belonging to this PT were defined as the outbreak strain. The remaining virulent serogroup A isolates belonged to 4 PTs differing by =3 bands from the outbreak strain. Two virulent, Danish, serogroup A isolates differed by 2 bands from the Norwegian outbreak strain. All but 3 (95%) of the virulent isolates had the pgrA variant while 85% of the benign isolates had the pgrB variant.
This study provides evidence that the footrot outbreak in Norway in 2008 most likely was caused by new introduction and local spread of one virulent D. nodosus strain.
Notes
Cites: Infect Genet Evol. 2014 Mar;22:273-923748018
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Jun;122(3):521-810459657
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2003 Mar 20;92(1-2):169-7812488080
Cites: Aust Vet J. 1970 Aug;46(8):382-45471272
Cites: Res Vet Sci. 1978 May;24(3):300-4674842
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 1993 Jul;36(1-2):113-228236773
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1995 Sep;33(9):2233-97494007
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 1998 Jul;62(3):243-509791871
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2014 Jun 4;170(3-4):375-8224698131
Cites: Nat Biotechnol. 2007 May;25(5):569-7517468768
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2010 Mar;48(3):877-8220071558
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2011 Jan 27;147(3-4):358-6620655152
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2013 Apr 12;163(1-2):142-823332560
Cites: J Dairy Sci. 2013;96(12):7617-2924140335
PubMed ID
24886510 View in PubMed
Less detail

A SEROLOGIC SURVEY OF PATHOGENS IN WILD BOAR ( SUS SCROFA) IN SWEDEN.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295282
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2018 04; 54(2):229-237
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Anna Malmsten
Ulf Magnusson
Francisco Ruiz-Fons
David González-Barrio
Anne-Marie Dalin
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2018 04; 54(2):229-237
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Female
Parasitic Diseases, Animal - epidemiology - parasitology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sus scrofa
Sweden - epidemiology
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Abstract
The wild boar ( Sus scrofa) population has increased markedly during the last three decades in Sweden and in other parts of Europe. This population growth may lead to increased contact between the wild boar and the domestic pig ( Sus scrofa scrofa), increasing the risk of transmission of pathogens. The objective of our study was to estimate the seroprevalence of selective pathogens, known to be shared between wild boars and domestic pigs in Europe, in three wild boar populations in Sweden. In total, 286 hunter-harvested female wild boars were included in this study. The sera were analyzed for antibodies against nine pathogens using different commercial or in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Antibodies were detected against porcine parvovirus (78.0%), porcine circovirus type 2 (99.0%), swine influenza virus (3.8%), Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (17.5%), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (24.8%), and Toxoplasma gondii (28.6%). No antibodies were detected against porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, Brucella suis, or Mycobacterium bovis. Our results highlight the potential importance of the wild boar as a reservoir for pathogens potentially transmissible to domestic pigs and which also may affect human health.
PubMed ID
29377751 View in PubMed
Less detail

Spatial patterns of antimicrobial resistance genes in a cross-sectional sample of pig farms with indoor non-organic production of finishers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282228
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2017 May;145(7):1418-1430
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
A C Birkegård
A K Ersbøll
T. Halasa
J. Clasen
A. Folkesson
H. Vigre
N. Toft
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2017 May;145(7):1418-1430
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteria - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Feces - microbiology
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Microbial Sensitivity Tests - veterinary
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in pig populations is a public health concern. There is a lack of information of spatial distributions of AMR genes in pig populations at large scales. The objective of the study was to describe the spatial pattern of AMR genes in faecal samples from pig farms and to test if the AMR genes were spatially randomly distributed with respect to the geographic distribution of the pig farm population at risk. Faecal samples from 687 Danish pig farms were collected in February and March 2015. DNA was extracted and the levels of seven AMR genes (ermB, ermF, sulI, sulII, tet(M), tet(O) and tet(W)) were quantified on a high-throughput real-time PCR array. Spatial differences for the levels of the AMR genes measured as relative quantities were evaluated by spatial cluster analysis and creating of risk maps using kriging analysis and kernel density estimation. Significant spatial clusters were identified for ermB, ermF, sulII and tet(W). The broad spatial trends in AMR resistance evident in the risk maps were in agreement with the results of the cluster analysis. However, they also showed that there were only small scale spatial differences in the gene levels. We conclude that the geographical location of a pig farm is not a major determinant of the presence or high levels of AMR genes assessed in this study.
PubMed ID
28215194 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.