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A 12-month fever surveillance study in a veterans' long-stay institution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238375
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1985 Sep;33(9):590-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1985
Author
T P Finnegan
T W Austin
R D Cape
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1985 Sep;33(9):590-4
Date
Sep-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bacterial Infections - complications
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Fever - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299
Hospitals, Veterans
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Ontario
Abstract
This report describes a 12-month fever surveillance survey in a 258-bed veterans long-term care institution. There were 128 episodes of fever (one episode per 24 patient-months); 114 were studied. Lower respiratory tract infections were most frequent, 36 (32%), with 26 (23%) urinary tract infections. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common pathogen in the chest infections and Proteus mirabilis the most common of the urinary tract infections. In 40 (35%) there was no evidence of a lower respiratory tract, urinary tract, or other bacterial infection. Most recovered rapidly, many with no specific treatment. There was a 16% mortality associated with the febrile episodes.
PubMed ID
4031336 View in PubMed
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Acute acalculous cholecystitis in critically ill patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9411
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2004 Sep;48(8):986-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
J. Laurila
H. Syrjälä
P A Laurila
J. Saarnio
T I Ala-Kokko
Author Affiliation
Division of Intensive Care, Department of Anesthesiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland. jouko.laurila@pp_fimnet.fi
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2004 Sep;48(8):986-91
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
APACHE
Adult
Aged
Bacterial Infections - complications - microbiology
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cholecystectomy
Cholecystitis - diagnosis - etiology - microbiology
Critical Illness
Female
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Organ Failure - etiology
Norepinephrine - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Palpation
Vasoconstrictor Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is a serious complication of critical illness. We evaluated the underlying diseases, clinical and diagnostic features, severity of associated organ failures, and outcome of operatively treated AAC in a mixed ICU patient population. METHODS: The data of all ICU patients who had operatively confirmed AAC during their ICU stay between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2001 were collected from the hospital records and the intensive care unit's data management system for predetermined variables. RESULTS: Thirty-nine (1%) out of 3984 patients underwent open cholecystectomy for AAC during the two-year period. Infection was the most common admission diagnosis, followed by cardiovascular surgery. The mean APACHE II score on admission was 25, and 64% of the patients had three or more failing organs on the day of cholecystectomy. The mean length of ICU stay before cholecystectomy was 8 days, and the mean total length of ICU stay was 19 days. Most patients (85%) received norepinephrine infusion, and 90% suffered respiratory failure before cholecystectomy. Hospital mortality was 44%. The non-survivors had higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores on the day of cholecystectomy compared to the survivors (12.9 vs. 9.5, P = 0.007). CONCLUSION: Acute acalculous cholecystitis was associated with severe illness, infection, long ICU stay, and multiple organ failure. Mortality was related to the degree of organ failure. Prompt diagnosis and active treatment of AAC can be life-saving in these patients.
PubMed ID
15315616 View in PubMed
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Acute infections and venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130192
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
M. Schmidt
E. Horvath-Puho
R W Thomsen
L. Smeeth
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. morten.schmidt@dce.au.dk
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Algorithms
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - complications
Bacterial Infections - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - complications
Cross Infection - complications - drug therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Intraabdominal Infections - complications
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Embolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Skin Diseases, Bacterial - complications
Urinary Tract Infections - complications
Venous Thromboembolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Data on the association between acute infections and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse. We examined whether various hospital-diagnosed infections or infections treated in the community increase the risk of VTE.
We conducted this population-based case-control study in Northern Denmark (population 1.8 million) using medical databases. We identified all patients with a first hospital-diagnosed VTE during the period 1999-2009 (n = 15 009). For each case, we selected 10 controls from the general population matched for age, gender and county of residence (n = 150 074). We identified all hospital-diagnosed infections and community prescriptions for antibiotics 1 year predating VTE. We used odds ratios from a conditional logistic regression model to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of VTE within different time intervals of the first year after infection, controlling for confounding.
Respiratory tract, urinary tract, skin, intra-abdominal and bacteraemic infections diagnosed in hospital or treated in the community were associated with a greater than equal to twofold increased VTE risk. The association was strongest within the first 2 weeks after infection onset, gradually declining thereafter. Compared with individuals without infection during the year before VTE, the IRR for VTE within the first 3 months after infection was 12.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.3-13.9) for patients with hospital-diagnosed infection and 4.0 (95% CI: 3.8-4.1) for patients treated with antibiotics in the community. Adjustment for VTE risk factors reduced these IRRs to 3.3 (95% CI: 2.9-3.8) and 2.6 (95% CI: 2.5-2.8), respectively. Similar associations were found for unprovoked VTE and for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism individually.
Infections are a risk factor for VTE.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22026462 View in PubMed
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[Acute subdural empyema due to peptostreptococcus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225988
Source
No To Shinkei. 1991 Aug;43(8):781-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
M. Ueno
E. Nakai
Y. Naka
T. Kido
K. Kinoshita
T. Itakura
N. Komai
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurological Surgery, Wakayama Rousai Hospital, Japan.
Source
No To Shinkei. 1991 Aug;43(8):781-5
Date
Aug-1991
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Empyema, Subdural - etiology - surgery
Female
Frontal Sinusitis - complications
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - complications
Humans
Peptostreptococcus
Abstract
A very rare case of acute subdural empyema due to peptostreptococcus was reported. A 11-year-old-girl was admitted to our hospital with high grade fever, unconsciousness and rt hemiparesis. CT scans showed the mass effect caused by the subdural empyema over the left frontotemporal region. Subdural empyema was evacuated by the craniotomy. Peptostreptococcus was found in the pus obtained during the operation. However, CT scans 10 days after the operation revealed another subdural empyema in the left frontal base and interhemispheric fissure, which was removed again by the craniotomy using coronal incision 14 days after the first operation. Frontal sinusitis was also demonstrated by CT scan. Killian's operation to the frontal sinusitis was performed by otorhinolaryngologists at the same time. Six weeks after the second operation, she was discharged without any neurological deficits. Peptostreptococcus is one of the indigenous microflora of the oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal tract and genitourinary system and may be a causative microorganism in every type of human infection due to its abnormal localization. There is a controversy concerning surgical management subdural empyema. Both the burr hole drainage of pus and the craniotomy are advocated. Associated otorhinologic lesions must not be overlooked. Otorhinologic consultation should immediately be obtained so that the drainage of an infected paranasal or mastoid sinus can be performed at the time of craniotomy. This is critical to prevent the recurrence of the subdural empyema from further extension of the extracranial disease.
PubMed ID
1681835 View in PubMed
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An epidemiologic study of late-term abortions in dairy cattle in Denmark, July 2000-August 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80735
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2006 Dec 18;77(3-4):215-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-18-2006
Author
Carpenter Tim E
Chrièl Mariann
Andersen Mette M
Wulfson Liana
Jensen Astrid M
Houe Hans
Greiner Matthias
Author Affiliation
Center for Animal Disease Modeling and Surveillance, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA. tecarpenter@ucdavis.edu
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2006 Dec 18;77(3-4):215-29
Date
Dec-18-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Veterinary - epidemiology - etiology
Animals
Bacterial Infections - complications - veterinary
Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease - complications
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - diagnosis
Coccidiosis - complications - veterinary
Dairying - methods
Denmark
Female
Incidence
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Seasons
Space-Time Clustering
Abstract
Abortion in dairy cows in well-managed dairies is not common but differences have been reported probably due to variation in animal health, nutrition and management, as well as difficulties in observing the aborted material. A 38-month study of 507 large Danish dairy herds revealed 3354 late-term abortions and 224,419 calvings were recorded. During the study period, a total of 3717 submissions were made to the Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research (DFVF). A broad spectrum of abortive agents was isolated but none were found to be statistically associated with abortions. The number of abortions in a month on a dairy was significantly (P0.17) or spatial scan tests (P>0.23). Ederer-Myers-Mantel test was applied to 3 years of data on the highest aborting dairies and showed that July had nearly double the expected number of maximum monthly abortions (P
PubMed ID
16962189 View in PubMed
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Antibiotics and asthma medication in a large register-based cohort study - confounding, cause and effect.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129562
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Jan;42(1):104-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
C. Almqvist
B. Wettermark
G. Hedlin
W. Ye
C. Lundholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. catarina.almqvist@ki.se
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Jan;42(1):104-11
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - classification - therapeutic use
Asthma - complications - drug therapy
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - complications - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - drug therapy - microbiology
Sweden
Abstract
An association between asthma and antibiotic usage has been demonstrated, and the issue of reverse causation and confounding by indication is much debated.
Our aim was to study the association between different classes of antibiotics and prescription of asthma medication in a register-based cohort of all Swedish children, born between July 2005 and June 2009, ever treated with antibiotics.
Data on dispensed prescriptions of antibiotics (ATC-codes J01) and asthma medication (ATC-codes R03A-D) were requested from the Prescribed Drug Register. The association between dispensed prescriptions of different classes of antibiotics and asthma medication was analysed with Cox regression and a descriptive sequence symmetry analysis.
In total, 211 192 children had received prescriptions of antibiotics. There was a strong association between prescription of antibiotics and prescription of asthma medication. The hazard ratios (HRs) for asthma medication associated with prescription of amoxicillin, penicillin, cephalosporin and macrolides (Gram-positive infections) were stronger than HRs associated with prescription of sulphonamides, trimethoprim and quinolones (urinary tract infections) and flucloxacillin (skin and soft tissue infections), e.g. first year HR = 2.27 (95% confidence intervals 2.17-2.37) as compared with HR = 1.04 (0.78-1.40). The HR associated with broad spectrum antibiotics was significantly higher than the narrow spectrum.
Our data suggest that the association between antibiotics and asthma is subject to either reverse causation or confounding by indication due to respiratory tract infections. This implies that careful consideration is required as to whether or not symptoms from the respiratory tract in early childhood should be treated with antibiotics or asthma medication.
PubMed ID
22092483 View in PubMed
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80 records – page 1 of 8.